Monday, December 19, 2011

Dalbergia

Dalbergia

A genus of close to 100 species of trees native to the tropics of all continents except for Australia. The foliage of most species looks like that of Robinia pseudoacacia - Black Locust. Many species are valuable for their timber which is excellent for cabinet making.
Propagation is from seed after soaking in water for 24 to 48 hours. They should be planted on their permanent site while small at the beginning of the rainy season.

Dalbergia greveana
A very large tree native to central Africa where it is endangered.
Some records include: largest on record - 180 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.

Dalbergia hupeana
A medium-sized tree, reaching up to 66 feet, that is a widespread native of southern China where it is sometimmes harvested for its timber.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 7 to 11 oblong or elliptical leaflets, up to 2.5 x 1.6 inches in size.
The flowers are borne on panicles up to 8 x 8 inches in size.
The bark is gray.

Dalbergia latifolia ( Bombay Rosewood )
A large, evergreen to drought deciduous tree that is native to monsoon forests of India and Nepal. Some records include: 25 years - 67 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; largest on record - 136 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.5 feet. It is becoming endangered in the wild due to exploitation of its valuable timber.
The pinnate leaves, up to 9 inches in length, are composed of 7 leaflets, up to 3 inches in length.
The white flowers are borne in clusters.
The gray bark is fibrous and peeling.
Hardy zones 10+. It is tolerant of clay and extreme heat to as much as 115 F.

Dalbergia melanoxylon ( African Blackwood )
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 32 inches with a trunk diameter increase of 0.5 inches; 2 years - 5 feet; 3 years - 7.5 feet; 4 years - 10 feet; 8 years - 16 feet; largest on record - 100 feet.
The leaves, up to 9 inches in length, are composed of up to 9 leaflets.
Thrives in Yuma

Dalbergia nigra
Some records include: largest on record - 130 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
Hardy zones

Dalbergia oliveri ( Tamalan )
Also called Burmese Rosewood. A spreading, medium size evergreen tree native to Burma and Thailand.
Some records include: largest on record - 100 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet. It is becoming endangered in the wild due to exploitation of its valuable timber.
The fern-like pinnate leaves, up to 11 inches in length, are composed of up to 21 leaflets, up to an inch in length.
The flowers are borne in panicles. The lavender buds open to pink flowers that fade to white.
They are followed by narrow seed pods.
The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy zones 11 to 12

Dalbergia retusa
A large tree native to Central America where it is endangered due to exploitation of its valuable timber. Some records include: largest on record - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The pinnate leaves are composed of leaflets, up to 5 x 1.5 inches.
Hardy zones 10+

Dalbergia sisso ( Indian Rosewood )
A very rapid growing large tree native to southern Iran and India. Some records include: 1 year - 16 feet; 5 years - 33 feet; 10 years - 50 feet; 12 years - trunk diameter of 8 inches; 30 years - trunk diameter of 1.5 feet; largest on record - 120 x 75 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 feet.
The leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are composed of 5 leathery, ovate to rounded leaflets, up to 3 inches in length.
The fragrant, pink to white flowers, up to 0.6 inches long, are borne on dense clusters, up to 4 inches in length, during spring.
Hardy zones 9b to 12 tolerating as low as 20 F. It requires a soil PH from 5 to 8 and an average yearly rainfall between 20 and 180 inches but can tolerate as low as 12 inches during an individual year. Does not enjoy clay. Propagation is from seed, softwood cuttings and hardwood cuttings.

* photo of unknown internet source


Dalbergia stevensonii ( Honduran Rosewood )
A large tree native to Belize where it is endangered.
Some records include: largest on record - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
Hardy zones 10+

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