Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Inula

Inula
A genus of moisture loving, tough, sturdy perennials with yellow, daisy-like flowers that actually are related to the Daisies. Easy to grow in full sun or light shade on any fertile, deep, moist soil, they are deer resistant. Older clumps can be divided during autumn or early spring.

* photo of unknown internet source


Inula acaulis
A rhizomatous, mat-forming perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 inches x 1.5 foot.
It makes an excellent plant for the rock garden or front of the border.
The narrow leaves are mid-green.
The stemless, yellow flowers are borne during early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun, it does not enjoy the hot humid summers of the southeastern U.S.

Inula ensifolia ( Swordleaf Inula )
A rhizomatous, clump-forming perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 2 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, that is native to the Caucasus.
The linear leaves, up to 6.3 inches in length, are mid-green.
The yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne during mid to late summer lasting up to 1.5 months.
It will often bloom the first year from seed.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.

Inula helenium ( Elecampane )
A fast growing to invasive, rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 4 ( rarely over 6 ) feet, that is native to temperate parts of Eurasia though is now occasionally found in the wild on the east coast and in the Pacific Northwest in the U.S. It is locally naturalized around Cape Croker on the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario, Canada. It is found in open moist to wet woodland and roadsides in the wild.
The huge, toothed, wavy-edged, elliptical leaves, up to 30 x 8 ( rarely over 20 ) inches, are deep green.
The foliage is rough above, velvety white beneath.
The yellow, daisy-like flowers, up to 4 ( usually half that ) inches across, are borne during mid-summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.
A tea can be made from the roots. This tea is a strong anti biotic. This substance called Helenin kills bacteria in concentrations as low as 1 in 10 000 and the tea is great for external use in cleaning skin infections, sores and wounds. It is even known to kill antibiotic resistant MRSA ( Staphylococcus aureus ) infections.

* photo taken on Aug 2 2013 in Stratford, Ontario

* photo of unknown internet source

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photo


Inula hookeri ( Hooker Inula )
A fast spreading to invasive, dense, clump-forming perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 3.5 ( rarely over 2.5 ) feet. It is native to mountains in the Himalayas from Nepal to southwest China; south into Burma.
The toothed, lance-shaped leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are hairy and deep green.
The intense deep yellow flowers, up to 3.2 inches across, are borne mid-summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 preferring partial shade on moist, deep, fertile, well drained soil.

Inula magnifica
A spectacular, fast growing perennial, reaching a maximum size of 8 x 6.5 feet, that is native to the Himalayas. Great for the back of the border and next to water to add tropical effect.
The huge, elliptical leaves, up to 40 inches in length, are deep green above, hairy beneath.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 6 inches across, are borne up to 20 per corymb during mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 ( 5 on protected sites ) in full sun on moist to wet soil.

Inula orientalis ( Caucasian Inula )
Also called Inula grandiflora. A rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 4 feet, that is native to the Caucasus.
The smooth-edged, elliptical leaves are up to 6 inches in length, are deep green.
The orange-yellow flowers, up to 3.2 inches across, are borne during early summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

Inula royleana ( Himalayan Elecampane )
Also called Inula racemosa. A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 8 x 3 feet, that is native to mountains the western Himalayas ( Pakistan to Kashmir ).
The toothed, ovate leaves, up to 18 inches in length, are hairy, mid-green.
The orange-yellow flowers, up to 5 ( rarely over 3 ) inches across, are borne late summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 8, it does not enjoy excessive winter wetness or hot summers.

'Sonnenspeer'
Reaches up to 10 ( rarely over 7 ) feet with large yellow flowers borne during summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 in full sun.

3 comments:

  1. I wonder if this would grow in a pot during our winter in Tucson. Beautiful plant.

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  2. I've grown Inula Magnifica for many years here in our Nova Scotia garden. It is pretty awesome..and deserves a better location than it now has in the cottage garden.

    Fortunately, it has reseeded sprouting just this spring..maybe it will find it's own 'perfect place'.

    Thanks for all the info you give on your blog. It's very special to visit.

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  3. Thank you! Are plants of the Inula genus commonly grown in the Canadian Maritimes. They are much underused in the eastern U.S. especially.
    Really not sure if it would grow in Tucson considering it is native to humid temperate regions of Eurasia that resemble eastern Canada and the northeastern parts of the U.S.
    Luckily the Tucson area has no shortage of interesting plants however I suspect the very dry air combined with wind would damage the foliage on this one.

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