Thursday, April 29, 2010

Mandevilla

* photos taken on August 2 2010 in Bayfield, Ontario


Mandevilla x amabilis ( Pink Mandevilla )
A fast growing, woody, twinging, evergreen vine, originating in Brazil.
A trellis, fence or some structure is needed to support the growth.
Some records include: 1st year - 6 feet; largest on record - 50 feet ( vining height ).
The thick, leathery, deeply-veined, elliptical leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The 5-petalled, pink flowers, up to 4 inches across, are borne mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 requiring full sun on fertile, well drained soil of any PH that is moist during the summer. Very drought tolerant and moderately salt tolerant.
Old plants can be cut to the ground and will regrow.
Propagation is from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken on July 7 2011 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario


Mandevilla x amoena 'Alice du Pont'
A vigorous, twining, woody-stemmed, evergreen vine, reaching a maximum height of 30 feet.
The deeply-veined, oval leaves, up to 8 inches across, are glossy deep green.
The intense, bright rose-pink, funnel-shaped flowers, up to 4 inches across, are borne in clusters during summer.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 requiring full sun on moist, fertile, light, humus-rich, well drained soil of any PH that is moist during the summer. Very drought tolerant and moderately salt tolerant.
Old plants can be cut to the ground and will regrow.
Propagation is from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken on Aug 2 2012 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on June 10 2013 in Columbia, MD


Mandevilla laxa ( Chilean Jasmine )
A rapid growing, deciduous vine, reaching a maximum height of 30 feet, that is native to Chile.
The ovate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are luxuriant green.
The very fragrant, white to pink, funnel-shaped flowers, up to 4 inches across, are borne in corymbs.
Hardy zones 8+, stem hardy to 15 F, root hardy to 5 F.
Propagation is from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* photos taken on August 2 2010 in Bayfield, Ontario



* photo taken on Aug 2 2012 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos taken on June 10 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on July 17 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario


Mandevilla sanderi
Also called Dipladenia sanderi. A semi-climbing perennial, reaching up to 8 x 3 feet.
The large, scarlet-red, trumpet-shaped flowers appear all summer long. The flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 ( often planted as an annual in cooler climates ) in full sun on moist, fertile, well drained soil. It thrives in hot humid summers and is drought tolerant.

* photo taken on July 8 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 24 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 12 2016 in Columbia, MD


Mandevilla splendens
A twining, evergreen woody vine, reaching a maximum height of 30 feet, that is native to mountain forests of southeastern Brazil.
The pointed, broad elliptical leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are glossy deep green. The leathery foliage is deeply veined.
The rose-pink ( with yellow center ) flowers, up to 4 inches across, are borne late spring to early summer.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 in partial shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil of any PH that is moist during the summer.
Old plants can be cut to the ground and will regrow. Patio container plants can be cut back hard and moved into a cool greenhouse during winter. Insect pests and disease rarely bother this plant.
Propagation is from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer or seed sown during spring.

* photo taken on June 12 2013 in Columbia, MD


'Red Riding Hood'

* photo taken on June 12 2013 in Columbia, MD

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Chionanthus - Fringe Tree

Chionanthus
A genus of deciduous small trees or shrubs that are native to the eastern U.S. They are easy to grow, generally pest and disease resistant ( powdery mildew can occur but is rare ) and can be reproduced from seed sown during autumn. May take 2 years to germinate.

Chionanthus pygmaeus ( Pygmy Fringe Tree )
An attractive, medium-sized shrub, reaching only 4 x 4 feet on average, that is native to sand scrub in central Florida. It is endangered in the wild. The largest on record is only 13 x 6 feet.
The narrow leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are leathery, glossy deep green.
The flowers in April are white and borne on abundant clusters.
They are followed by berries up to 2 inches each.
Hardy north to zone 5 ( should be tested as far north as zone 3 ). It requires dryish, very well drained soil and prefers partial shade. This Fringe Tree is salt water tolerant.

* photo of unknown internet source


Chionanthus retusus ( Chinese Fringe Tree )
An attractive, moderate growing, medium-sized ( rarely large ), deciduous tree. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 5 feet; 10 years - 20 x 20 feet ( average ); largest on record - 100 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet. The largest known Chinese Fringe Tree in the U.S. has already grown to 45 x 30 feet in Montgomery County, PA. Larger trees are known in central & eastern China and Japan where it is sometimes planted as a street tree.
The smooth-edged, oval leaves, up to 8 x 4 ( rarely over 5 x 2.5 ) inches, are glossy deep green above, downy white beneath. The foliage appears late in spring and turns golden-yellow during autumn.
The white flowers, up to 1 inch, are borne in clusters, up to 4 inches, during mid spring.
They are followed by deep blue, egg-shaped fruit, up to 0.7 inches in length.
The corky and deeply-grooved bark is beige to bright brown.
Thehe Chinese Fringe Tree prefers moist, neutral to alkaline, well drained soil. It is both disease resistant and very drought, heat, clay soil and pollution tolerant. Prefers hot summers and thrives in sun or shade. Fibrous roots make this tree easy to transplant. Hardy zone 4 to 8 however only seed originating from the coldest parts of the range will grow in zones 4 and 5. 'Arnold Pride' is rated hardy to -25 F.

* photo taken @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC on Feb 2009

* photo taken in Wilkes-Barre, PA

* photo taken on March 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum


* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum

* photos taken on April 18 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.








* photos taken on May 1 2010






* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on May 13 2015 in Pikesville, MD

* photos taken on Maryland Horticultural Society garden tour, Clarksville

* photo taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Arnolds Pride'
Rapid growth and a strong central leader. It is also self-fruitful unlike the species. Vase shaped in habit; it can reach up to 20 x 20 feet in 10 years.

* photos taken on June 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 15 2015 in Columbia, MD


Chionanthus virginiana
A moderate growing, small, deciduous tree, native to moist forests of the eastern U.S. ( from Missouri to New York State; south to eastern Texas to central Florida ). It can be very variable in growth depending on siting and some records include: growth rate - 4 feet; 10 years - 10 x 8 feet; 20 years - 40 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 inches; largest recorded - 50 x 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.8 feet.
Large trees can be photographed on the grounds of Mount Vernon Historical Park near Alexandria, Virginia.
The oblong leaves, up to 8 x 4 inches in size, are smooth, glossy deep green above; finely-downy, light green beneath. This is one of the last plants to leaf out in spring. The foliage turns to golden yellow late in autumn.
The small, narrow-petalled, fleecy, fragrant, white flowers are densely clustered into large drooping panicles up to 10 inches long forming mop like heads that cover the plant in late spring. The flowers last up to 3 weeks. The Fringe Tree does not flower well in areas of cool summers.
There is a very rare pink flowered form that has been reported.
The flowers are followed by bloomy, deep blue, grape-like fruits, up to 0.7 inches in length. They ripen in September.
Fruiting is better when planted in groups. Only female plants produce the berries.
The bark is red-brown and smooth becoming furrowed with age.
The shoots are light green, thick and downy at first, later becoming orange or light brown. The buds are light brown and ovate
Prefers deep, fertile, moist, acidic, well drained loamy soil however is tolerant of less ideal sites and is even tolerant of urban conditions and pollution.
Many 2 to 3 year old plants are weak and need to be pruned to the ground in March to get strong shoots.
As with C. retusus; this tree can be reproduced from seed sown as soon as it is ripe in the fall. The seeds should be soaked for 24 hours before sowing. Germination may take up to 18 months and the seed should be protected from winter frost.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 ( tolerating as low as -35 F ) in full sun to partial shade on fertile, moist, well drained soil. Tolerant of pollution and harsh climates as it has survived at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Ontario.

* photo taken on April 18 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo of unknown internet source




* photos taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.






* photo taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario

* photos taken on June 14 2012 in Ellicott City, MD
* photos taken on July 10 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* photos taken on Oct 31 2013 @ Hampton Ntl. Historic Site, Towson, MD

* photos taken on May 21 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 21 2014 @ Hampton Ntl Historic Site, Towson, MD

* photo taken on May 25 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on on Aug 23 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 28 2015 in Columbia, MD

* historic archive photo

* photo taken on May 9 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 24 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 14 2016 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on May 24 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Emerald Knight'
A male form that is vigorous and very tree like in habit reaching a maximum size of 30 x 25 feet in only 10 years.
The leathery foliage is extremely glossy, dark green, very long ( up to 9.5 x 4 inches ), turning to an attractive golden yellow and lasting very late.
The fragrant, fleecy, white flowers are profuse in large clusters.
Hardy zones 4 to 9

* photos taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA

* photos taken on May 28 2017 in Howard Co., MD