Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Corydalis

A genus of perennials closely related to the Dicentra ( Bleeding Hearts ).
Most prefer woodland conditions consisting of partial shade on persistantely moist, cool, fertile, humus-rich, well drained soil. Some species may die back during the hottest part of summer then re-appear with another flush of leaves as the weather cools during early fall.
They can be divided during early autumn or spring before growth begins but generally they do not like root disturbance. Fresh seed can also be sown in a mixture of 1/2 leaf composet and 1/2 sand. Insect pests are rare, disease are rare though include powdery mildew and rust.

* excellent photo link found on internet

http://www.wildbulbs.eu/coryd.htm

Corydalis ambigua
A perennial, forming a clump, up to 6 x 6 inches, that is native to far eastern Russia, Manchuria, Korea and northern Japan.
The paired leaves are composed of rounded leaflets.
The flowers, up to 1 inch long, with upturned spurs, are bright blue ( rarely purple or white ). They are borne atop a stalk, up to 1 foot high, during mid to late spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial shade.

Corydalis 'Blackberry Wine'
A fast growing, spreading perennial, forming a foliage clump as much as 14 inches x 3 feet in 2 years, barely larger at maturity. It looks great in plantings with Hostas, Bergenias, Heuchera and Corydalis lutea. It generally does not go summer dormant.
The ferny foliage is blue-green.
The abundant, fragrant, small, deep red-purple, tubular flowers are borne on stalks up to 2 feet in height during spring and sporadically throughout the summer. It often blooms late summer into early autumn if cut back after the first flush of blooms.
Hardy in zones 4 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, fertile, alkaline, very well drained soil. Use lime to make the soil more alkaline if the PH is low.

* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum


Corydalis 'Canary Feathers'
A vigorous perennial, reaching up to 10 x 10 inches in size.
The feathery leaves are soft blue-green.
The canary-yellow flowers are borne in large trusses.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in sun or shade.

* photos taken on Sep 5 2013 in Elkridge, MD

* photos taken on May 2013 in Columbia, MD


Corydalis cashmeriana ( Kashmir Corydalis )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 16 x 32 inches, that is native to high mountains in Kashmir.
The dense, ferny foliage is blue-green. The leaves are composed of leaflets, up to 1 inch in length.
The flowers, up to 1 inch in length, with curved spurs, are brilliant blue. The flowers are borne on racemes of up to 8, during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial shade on cool, peaty, acidic, well drained soil.
Prefers cool humid summers and thrives in places such as the Scotland and far southern Chile.

Corydalis cava
Similar to C. solida and reaching up to 10 inches in height, but blooms slightly later during mid-spring. It becomes dormant during summer.
The pink flowers are borne on spikes that are typically longer than that of C. solida.
There is a white form that is rare.
It prefers a well drained soil that is a mix of leaf compost and sand.

Corydalis chaerophylla
Similar to Corydalis cheilidonifolia except with bronze foliage.

Corydalis cheilidonifolia ( Fernleaf Corydalis )
A long-lived, evergreen perennial, reaching a maximum size of 1.5 feet x 40 inches, that is native to China.
The ferny leathery leaves, up to 18 inches in length, form a rosette.
The foliage is gray-green in color.
The pale yellow flowers, up to 0.3 inches, are borne on dense spikes, up to 10 inches in length, borne all season long.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in sun or shade. It may be invasive on some sites but does not like transplanting.

* photo taken on April 5 2010 in Columbia, MD


Corydalis elata ( Blue Corydalis )
A fast growing, semi-evergreen perennial, reaching a maximum size of 2.5 x 3 feet ( rarely exceeding 15 inches in height ), that is native to western China. It does not go dormant in summer.
The attractive fleshy foliage is vivid lime-green.
The cobalt-blue, tubular flowers are borne late spring to mid-summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in partial shade on moist, acidic, very well drained soil. Heat tolerant and thrives in the south.

Corydalis flavula ( Pale Corydalis )
An annual, reaching up to 16 inches in height, that is native to sandy open woods in eastern North America ( from southeast Nebraska to northern Illinois to southern Michigan to far southern Ontario to southern New York State; south to eastern Oklahoma to northern Louisiana to northern Alabama to central North Carolina ). It is also found on the Niagara Peninsula in Ontario. It is endangered in Nebraska, Iowa, Michigan, Ontario, New York State, Connecticut, Delaware and Georgia. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant around Point Pelee, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The foliage is finely dissected.
The pale yellow flowers, up to 0.3 inches in length, are borne mid to late spring. Hardy zones 5 to 8.

* photo taken on Oct 17 2013 in Olney, MD



Corydalis flexuosa ( Blue Corydalis )
A perenial, reaching a maximum size of 1.5 feet x 32 inches, that is native to southwestern China. It can spread up to 1.5 feet during the first season in the garden.
The lacy foliage is blue-green. While the foliage persists all season in cool summer climates, the plant will go summer dormant in regions with hot humid summers or where the soil becomes dry. During autumn it will sprout new foliage which persists through the next spring blooming season. They looks great as edging and used on landscape walls.
The fragrant, sky-blue flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are borne over a very long season from late spring into early summer, then sometimes sporadically until mid autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in partial to full shade on moist, fertile, humus-rich, well drained soil.

'Blue Panda'
A fast growing perennial, reaching a maximum size of 1.5 feet x 32 inches.
The ferny foliage is luxuriant green.
The intense sky-blue flowers are borne in early spring, often repeating during autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 8

* photo taken on Apr 2 2017 in Annapolis, MD


'China Blue'
More vigorous in habit with pale blue flowers.
The foliage is brownish at first, turning to blue-green.

'Purple Leaf'
Deep purple foliage forms a nice contrast with the intense blue flowers, otherwise identical to species.

Corydalis ledbouriana
A tuberous perennial that is native to Uzbekistan.

Corydalis leucanthema 'Silver Spectre'
A perennial reaching up to 1 x 3 feet, with green foliage and fragrant, bright purplish-pink ( with purple tips ) flowers.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 in partial shade.

Corydalis linstowiana
A low groundcover perennial, reaching up to 10 x 16 inches.
The fern-like, finely dissected leaves, up to 12 inches in length, are blue-green.
The flowers are pale blue.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial shade.

Corydalis lutea ( Yellow Corydalis )
A rapid-growing, long-lived, rhizomatous spreading perennial, reaching a maximum size of 2 x 3 feet, that is native to the Alps in Europe ( Switzerland to Yugoslavia; south to Italy ). Great for the shade garden and using on old walls. It looks great planted with Polemonium.
The fern-like leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are divided into wedged, lobed leaflets. The foliage is gray-green.
The blunt-spurred, intense golden-yellow flowers, up to 0.7 inches long, are borne on branched clusters from mid-spring to late autumn. It often seeds prolifically and may even become invasive on some sites though too pretty for anyone to mind.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in light to moderate shade on moist, very well drained soil. Tolerant of deep shade and in the southern part of its range prefers cool shady sites. It is moderately drought tolerant in cooler climates. On some sites it may freely self seed. They do not like transplanting, however careful dividing can be done during autumn.

* photo taken on annual Horticultural Society of Maryland Garden Tour







* photos taken on Aug 3 2012 in London, Ontario


Corydalis malkensis
Also called C. caucasica var alba. A tuberous perennial that is native to the Caucasus.
The attractive foliage is mid-green.
The large white flowers are borne during early spring.
It prefers a shady site with cool, moist, humus-rich, well drained soil.

Corydalis mucronata
A long-lived perennial that bears purple flowers.
It thrives on moist, humus-rich, well drained soils.

Corydalis nobilis
A tap-rooted perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 3 ( rarely over 2 ) feet, that is native to central Asia ( Siberia; south to Mongolia and northwest China ). It has naturalized in parts of Sweden.
It typically goes dormant early during summer if dry.
The fine-textured, deeply-divided leaves, up to 12 inches in length, are bright to mid-green.
The bright yellow flowers are borne on dense, short spikes during mid-spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 6 in partial shade on light, well drained soil. It is drought tolerant and easy to grow.

Corydalis ochotensis
A perennial, reaching up to 4 feet and forming large colonies, that is native to floodplain forests in Siberia, Kamchatka and northern Japan.
The ferny leaves, up to 1.5 feet in length, are bright green.
The yellow flowers, up to 0.8 inches long, are borne over a long season from mid-summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 8. Very tolerant of wet soil.

Corydalis ochroleuca ( White Corydalis )
An evergreen perennial, forming a clump reaching a maximum size of 16 x 32 inches, that is native to southeast Europe ( Italy to Yugoslavia; south to northern Greece ).
The attractive, deeply-serrated foliage is intense blue-green.
The creamy-white ( with yellow tips ) flowers, up to 0.6 inches in length, are borne late spring into early autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in sun or shade on just about any moist fertile, well drained soil.

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Corydalis ophiocarpa
A perennial, forming an evergreen foliage clump reaching a maximum size of 1.5 x 3 feet, that is native to the Himalayas.
The bipinnate foliage is gray-green.
The creamy-yellow flowers are borne on stalks up to 3 feet in height, during spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. Heat tolerant.

Corydalis paeoniifolia
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 2 feet in height, that is native from eastern Siberia to far southeastern Russia.
The pinnate leaves bear large, lobed, broad leaflets. The mid-green foliage resembles that of Paeonia lactiflora.
The pinkish-violet flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, are borne on dense, long racemes.
Hardy zones 4 to 6 ( possibly much hardier ).

* excellent photo link
https://search.yahoo.com/r/_ylt=A0oG7lHMlNFSDGMA.9tXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEzZWEwdjJuBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNQRjb2xvA2FjMgR2dGlkA1ZJUDMzNF8x/SIG=125e3rrv3/EXP=1389495628/**http%3a//www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/13122.html

Corydalis pauciflora ( Few Flowered Corydalis )
A perennial, reaching up to 1 foot in height, that is native to Siberia, Kamatchka, Sakhalin, Alaska and northwestern North America ( from far northern Alaska to southwest Northwest Territories; south to central British Columbia ).
The very beautiful, bright bluish-violet flowers are borne early to mid-summer lasting up to 4 weeks.
Hardy zones 1 to 5 ( est ).

* excellent photo link found on internet
http://www.alaskawildflowers.us/Kingdom/Plantae/Magnoliophyta/Magnoliopsida/Fumariaceae/Corydalis_pauciflora/index.html

Corydalis remota
Also called Corydalis turtschaninovii. A perennial, reaching up to 8 inches, that is native to from eastern Siberia to far southeastern Russia. It is similar to C. ambigua and is a stunningly beautiful plant.
The leaves are composed of lobed, narrow leaflets. The delicate-looking foliage is bright blue-green. The foliage dies down and the plant goes dormant during early summer.
Thee bright blue to purplish-blue flowers are borne mid to late spring.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 ( tolerating -40 F ).

* excellent photo link
http://www.plantsindex.com/worldplants/russia/vladivostok/spring/gallery/html/023832.html

http://www.edgewoodgardens.net/plants_album/the%20plants%20-%20%20complete%20collection/Fumariaceae/Corydalis/Section%20Corydalis/C.%20turtschaninovii/index.html

Corydalis scouleri ( Scouler's Corydalis )
A bold, broad spreading, stoloniferous perennial, reaching a maximum height of 5 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, that is native to moist woodlands in the Pacific Northwest ( from southern Vancouver Island to the Cascades in Washington; south to northern Oregon.
The ferny, lacy, thrice divided foliage is green.
The deep pink flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are borne in clusters of up to 30 during mid-spring.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial shade on moist, humus-rich soil

Corydalis sempervirens ( Pale Corydalis )
A semi-evergreen perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 ( rarely over 2 ) feet, that is native to sandy woodlands of northern North America ( from central Alaska to northwestern Northwest Territories to southwest Nunavut to Churchill, Manitoba to Moosonee, Ontario to Labrador and Newfoundland; south to Montana to northern Illinois to Pennsylvania ). It is found on rock outcrops and dry sandy shorelines.
The bipinnate leaves are composed of lobed leaflets, up to 4 inches in length.
The pink flowers are borne late spring to early autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 5

Coryalis solida
A tuberous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 12 x 15 inches, that is native to northern Eurasia. It has naturalized very locally in eastern North America to as far north as Wiarton, Ontario.
The attractive ferny foliage is blue-green to deep green. The foliage dies down during late spring as the plant goes dormant.
The showy, purplish-pink flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are borne in large clusters of up to 20 during early to mid spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 on a very well drained soil that is a mix of leaf compost and sand. The tubers can be divided during autumn.
The tuber contains a hullucinogenic sedative. It can be used as a sedative for insomnia and also as a stimulant and painkiller.

* historical archive photo


'Blue Pearl'
Rich blue-violet flowers.

'George Baker'
Fiery scarlet-red flowers.

'Nettleton Pink'
Pink flowers.

Corydalis wilsonii
An evergreen perennial reaching a maximum size of 16 x 32 inches, that is native to Hubei Province in China.
The ferny, finely-divided leaves, up to 10 inches in length, are blue-gray.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 0.6 inches in length, are borne on small racemes late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. Tolerant of alkaline soils.

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