Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Physocarpus - Ninebark

A genus of 10 attractive deciduous shrubs native to North America and northeastern Asia. They all have 3 to 5 lobed leaves, attractive white to pink late spring flowers and showy flaking orangish bark. The flowers are followed by clusters of 3 to 5 lobed, inflated fruits ripening in late summer.
The Ninebarks prefer full sun on moist, acidic, fertile, well drained soil. Most Ninebark do not like drought and will often drop their foliage during late summer if the soil becomes too dry though will typically releaf during the following spring.
They are rarely bothered by pests or diseases, powdery mildew may sometimes occur on plants that are overcroweded.
They can be sheared to make a hedge, otherwise pruning is restricted to the occasional removal of older shoots lacking in vigor from the base immediately after blooming to encourage new growth. Plants can be cut to slightly above ground-level every 10 years for renewal and vigor. Older plants can be transplanted while dormant if cut back during the process.
Propagation is from softwood cuttings taken during summer or hardwood cuttings taken while dormant. The species can also be grown from seed which is sown upon ripening and does not require pretreatment.

* photo of unknown internet source


Physocarpus amurensis ( Amur Ninebark )
A large shrub, to about 8 feet, that is native to Russia, Manchuria and Korea. Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 33 feet.
The toothed, 3 to 5 lobed leaves, up to 5 x 5 inches, are mid-green above, finely hairy almost white beneath. The leaves are larger than that of Physocarpus opulifolius and have pointed tip lobes.
The white flowers, borne in corymbs, up to 2 inches across, are borne during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

Physocarpus bracteatus ( Colorado Ninebark )
A dense, compact, rounded, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 6 feet, that is native to the Rocky Mountains in Colorado in the western U.S. It is equally stunning as Hydrangea arborescens while in bloom.
The leaves are similar to but have lobes that are more rounded than P. opulifolius. The foliage is mid-green.
The white flowers are borne on very showy clusters, up to 2 inches wide, during mid-summer.
The exfoliating, papery bark is very attractive.
Hardy zones 4b to 8, it is fully hardy and thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.

Physpcarpus capitata ( Western Ninebark )
A fast growing, upright, large shrub, that is native to western North America ( from Juneau, Alaska to near Banff National Park, Alberta to western Montana; south to central California ). Some records include: largest on record - 23 x 21 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 inches.
The deeply-lobed leaves, up to 4 x 4 inches, are glossy mid-green above, felted beneath.
The tiny creamy-white flowers, borne in showy, rounded corymbs, up to 5 inches across, are borne during late spring into early summer.
The older stems have attractive shredded orangish-brown bark.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade. Flood tolerant and also tolerates summer drought. It thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada but is rarely encountered otherwise in eastern North America.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photo taken by http://www.nwplants.com


Physocarpus intermedius ( Illinois Ninebark )
May actually be a subspecies of Physocarpus opulifolius. In fact, it is very similar in all ways to Physocarpus opulifolius except for having slightly smaller leaves and more compact habit, only reaching up to 6 x 9 feet in size. It is great for hedging.
The deep green foliage turns to yellow, orange and bronze during autumn.
The white flowers are borne on clusters up to 2 inches wide, during late spring.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.

Physocarpus malvaceus ( Mallow Ninebark )
A medium-sized, deciduous shrub, that is native to western North America from ( from near Olympia, Washington to Vernon, British Columbia to far southwest Alberta to central Montana; south to southwest Oregon to southwest Colorado ). Some records include: largest on record - 8 x 6 feet.
The coarsely-toothed, 3 to 5 lobed leaves, up to 3 x 3 inches, are smooth deep green above, finely hairy beneath. The foliage is early to appear in spring and turns to deep red-purple during autumn.
The small, cupped, white flowers, borne in corymbs, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne during early summer.
Older stems have gray peeling bark.
Hardy zones 2 to 8. Rare in the east but is reported to be an excellent landscape plant in southern Ontario. It is very heat and drought tolerant.

* photo taken by http://www.nwplants.com


Physocarpus monogynus ( Mountain Ninebark )
A thicket forming, arching, small to medium-sized shrub, that is native to central North America ( from Colorado to South Dakota; south to Arizona to Texas ). Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 20 inches; largest on record - 7 x 8 feet.
The toothed, 3 to 5 lobed, rounded leaves, up to 2 x 2 inches in size, are mid-green. The foliage persists late in autumn.
The white flowers, borne in flat corymbs, up to 2 inches across, are borne during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade, it is tolerant of both drought and wet soils. Prone to severe leaf diseases where summers are humid however makes an excellent landscape plant in the northern Plains and Rockies, even thriving in Fairbanks, Alaska.

* historical archive photo


Physocarpus opulifolius ( Eastern Ninebark )
A rapid growing, rounded, large, deciduous shrub, that is native to central and eastern North America ( from South Dakota to Armstrong, Ontario to Lansdowne House, Ontario to Attawapiskat, Ontario to Matagami, Quebec to New Brunswick; south to Colorado to the Florida panhandle & northern Georgia. In northern Ontario, it is most abundant along sandy or rocky shores of the Attawapiskat, Albany and Abitibi Rivers as well as the northern shores of Lake Huron and Superior through is scattered over a much large region. It is very abundant in Huron and Bruce Counties of Ontario. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant on the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 feet; 10 years - 13 x 17 feet; largest on record - 17 x 33 feet.
The toothed, 3-lobed leaves, up to 5 x 5 inches, are light green, turning to yellow or orange during autumn.
The white to pinkish-white flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne in corymbs, up to 3 inches across, during late spring into early summer.
The attractive bark is brown and shredding.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on cool, deep, fertile soil. Extremely hardy, it thrives even on the northern Great Plains and interior Alaska. Eastern Ninebark hates drought but is tolerant of poor soil and soil PH. They can be cut back hard during March for increased vigor and in fact should be cut to the ground every 10 years for renovation. The Eastern Ninebark roots fast from cuttings with or without rooting hormone and at a near 100% rate. Rooted cuttings grow very fast, so a cutting taken during midsummer, can become a nice 2 x 2 foot shrub by the middle of the following summer.

* photo taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario

* photo taken on August 4 2010 @ Birnam Woods Arboretum, Stratford, Ontario

* photos taken on Aug 3 2013 in Goderich, Ontario

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON

* photos taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON

* historic archive photo


'Amber Jubilee'
Originated as a seedling between Physocarpus opulifolius 'Diabolo' and 'Dart's Gold'; the foliage is intermediate in color between the two. It is vigorous in habit, reaching up to 7 feet in height.

* photo taken on May 20 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON


'Burgundy Candy'
Upright in habit, reaching up to 4.5 x 3.5 feet, with deep purplish-red foliage. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 3.5 feet.


* photos taken on May 21 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 26 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 16 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Center Glow'
Fast growing, reaching up to 8 x 10 feet in 5 years, eventually to 10 x 10 feet or more.
The young foliage that is bright golden-yellow to lime-green with a rosy red border. The foliage turns to deep rosy-red as it matures. The leaves turn to intense scarlet-red during autumn.
The white to pale pink flowers are followed by scarlet-red fruits during autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 7.

* photo taken on Sep 10 2014 in Mt Airy, MD

* photo taken on May 17 2017 in Annapolis, MD

* photos taken on Jul 17 2017 in Ottawa, ON


'Coppertina'
Compact but large, reaching up to 10 x 6 feet in 10 years with a maximum eventual size of 10 x 10 feet.
The very attractive foliage is coppery-orange during spring, turning to rich deep red during summer.
The flowers are pale pink.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 ( possibly 2 ) and has moderately good mildew resistance.

* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photo taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA

* photo taken on Aug 1 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Dart's Gold'
Dense and vase-shaped to arching in habit, reaching up to 8 x 8 ( rarely over 6 ) feet. Some records include: 5 years - 4 x 6 feet; 7 years - 5.2 x 6 feet.
The very attractive foliage is golden-yellow. often turning to lime-green by late summer.
The flowers are pinkish-white.
Extremely hardy, thriving in the northern Great Plains including Alberta.

* photos taken on August 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario

* photos taken on Aug 3 2013 in Goderich, Ontario

* photo taken @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photos taken on Jul 17 2017 in Gatineau, Quebec


'Diablo'
A very fast growing large shrub with deep reddish-purple foliage. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 8 feet; 4 years - 10 x 7 feet; largest on record - 17 x 20 ( rarely over 13 ) feet.
The flowers are pinkish-white.
Extremely hardy, thriving in the northern Great Plains including Alberta.

* photos taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on August 2 2010 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on August 4 2010 @ Stratford, Ontario

* photos taken on May 20 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA

* photo taken on June 9 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON


'Lady in Red'
Also called 'Ruby Spice'. A vigorous but dense and compact form, reaching up to 6.5 x 6.5 ( rarely over 5 ) feet in size.
The stunning, large foliage is glossy bright red at first, later turning to deep red.
The abundant pink flower clusters are borne during late spring.
Hardy zones 2 to 7.

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on May 15 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA

* photos taken on May 31 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 9 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Little Devil'
A dwarf, dense, compact form resembling 'Summer Wine' except reaching only 4 x 4 feet in 5 years. It can eventually reach up to 5 x 6 feet.
The foliage is also deep reddish-purple.
Hardy zones 3 to 7.

* photo taken on Aug 26 2016 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken on Nov 14 2016 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Apr 17 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 16 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 31 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 13 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 25 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 7 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 16 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Luteus'
A very vigorous, large shrub, reaching a maximum size of 13 x 17 feet. Some records include: 5 years - 6 feet ( average ).
The foliage is golden-yellow at first, turning to deep green. Foliage turns bronze during autumn.
The flowers are pure white.

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


'Nana'
Also called 'Nanus'. Dense and compact in habit, reaching a maximum size of 6 x 8 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, with small, deep green leaves. The foliage turns to orange, red and bronze during autumn.
The flowers are pure white.

'Nugget'
A dense, bushy form especially well adapted to the Great Plains ( esp. North Dakota ) where it can be used for shelterbelts and screening. Fast growing, dense and compact in habit; it can reach as much as 10 x 13 feet in 10 years. Some records include: 5 years - 6.5 x 7.5 feet.
The foliage is golden-bronze at first, turning to luxuriant bright green. The foliage appears early in spring and persists late in autumn when it often turns intense golden-yellow.
The flowers are pure white.
Hardy north to zone 2. Extremely hardy, thriving in the northern Great Plains including Alberta.

'Snowball'
Reaches up to 7.5 x 8.5 feet in 5 years, eventually more.
The foliage is deep green and the white flowers are borne in large clusters during mid to late spring.
Extremely hardy, thriving in the northern Great Plains including Alberta. Tough and drought tolerant.

'Summer Wine'
Semi-dwarf and compact in habit, reaching a maximum size of 7 x 7 feet. Some records include: 4 years - 6 x 6 feet. It originated as a hybrid between 'Diablo' and 'Nana'.
The large, deep reddish-purple foliage contrasts well with the pinkish-white flowers.

* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum


* photo taken on annual Horticultural Society of Maryland Garden Tour

* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on Aug 20 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on Oct 17 2013 in Olney, MD

* photo taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC

* photos taken on May 15 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 9 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on May 18 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 28 2017 in Howard Co., MD


'Tiny Wine'
A miniature form, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 4 feet.
The foliage is deep reddish-purple.

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on May 1 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Aug 13 2017 in Columbia, MD

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