Friday, April 2, 2010

Yucca

A genus including around 40 species of trees, shrubs and herbaceous perennials that are part of the larger Agavacae family.
The flowers attract hummingbirds.
Yucca's prefer full sun on light to loamy well drained soil but will tolerate poor sandy soil. They require a deep soil for their long taproot.
They grow most vigorously with a monthly feeding in summer.
Propagation can be from seed sown in spring ( often slow ), root cuttings taken in winter or removed suckers in spring. Seed should be soaked for 24 hours in warm water before sowing; germination in about a week. Yuccas are resistant to heat, drought, salt, ice, wind, storms, hail and fire.
Yucca is not generally eaten by deer.


* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken by W.H. Shaffer @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken by G.A. Duthis @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photos


* video found on Youtube


Yucca aloifolia ( Spanish Bayonet )
A fast growing, erect, single to multi-stemmed small tree reaching around 15 feet, that is native to the southeast U.S., Caribbean and Mexico. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 10 x 5 feet; largest on record - 28 x 17 feet with a trunk diameter of 0.5 feet ( 1.5 feet @ base ).
The lance-shaped, stiff, toothed, very sharp-pointed leaves up to 36 x 3 inches in size are gray-green to deep green in color.
The white, pendulous, bell-shaped flowers up to 2 x 4 inches are borne on erect spikes up to 32 inches in length in summer and fall.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 in sun to partial shade. Very salt, heat and drought tolerant and grows well on sand dunes. This Yucca can be cut back if it grows too tall. Propagation is from seed and suckers in spring.

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on July 21 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 22 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 2 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 22 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 26 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.

* historic archive photos


'Marginata'
Yellow edged foliage.

'Purpurea'
Purplish-green foliage turns redder during the winter.

'Tricolor'
Foliage has bold white to yellow striped in the center.

Yucca angustissima ( Narrowleaf Yucca )
Reaching up to 3 feet in height, it is native from southwest Utah; south to central Arizona to northwest New Mexico.
The very narrow leaves are up to 18 x 0.6 inches in size. The leaves are tipped by a brownish-yellow spine, up to 0.3 inches long and edged in white.
The greenish-white to white flowers, up to 2.1 inches long, are borne on a stalk up to 5 ( rarely over 3 ) feet in height.
Hardy zones 5+.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos


'Southside'
Foliage is bright blue.

Yucca baccata ( Banana Yucca )
Reaches up to 8 x 6 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, that is native to the southwestern U.S. and northern Mexico ( southern California to southeast Colorado and south ). It is variable, ranging from a single trunk or a clump of up to 10. Some records include: 7 years - 3.8 feet.
The leaves, up to 32 x 2 inches, range from gray-green to blue-green but usually having white filamentose hairs along the margin.
The white, bell-shaped flowers, up to 4.5 inches long, are borne on spikes up to 4 feet high, during late spring to early summer.
They are followed by edible fleshy fruit.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil. Extremely tolerant of heat and drought. Tolerant of much wetter climates than where it is native, it is even known to grow in milder parts of the British Isles if planted on very well drained soils.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photo taken by E.O. Wooton @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by W.C. Barnes @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Hualampoi Blue'
Reaches up to 4 feet with very blue leaves, otherwise similar.

Yucca baileyi ( Najavo Yucca )
A slow growing, small Yucca, reaching up to 10 feet in height, that is native to southern Utah and northern Arizona.
The sharp-tipped leaves, up to 30 x 2 inches, are deep green.
The large, white to pink flowers are borne on dense, upright spikes.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( tolerating -20 F ) in full sun on very well drained soil.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Yucca brevifolia ( Joshua Tree )
A slow growing branching tree to 40 feet or more that is native from central California to southwest Utah; south to southern California to southwest Arizona.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 1 foot; largest on record - 80 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The deep green straight, narrow, tooth edged leaves are up to 18 x 2 inches in size.
The green with cream tint, unpleasant smelling flowers are borne in spikes up to 20 inches in length in late spring.
The plated bark is gray to orange brown.
Hardy zones 6 to 11, not damaged at -10 F. It is also very heat and drought tolerant and prefers yearly rainfall from 8 to 12 inches. It does not tolerant of wet climates and does not exist in the eastern U.S. or most of Europe.

* photos of unknown internet source



* photos taken on Aug 15 2014 @ Rawlings Conservatory, Baltimore, MD

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photo taken by Paul S. Bieler @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photos

* photo taken by Albert Everett Wieslander and the Marian Koshland Bioscience and Natural Resources Library

* photo taken by Albert Everett Wieslander @ Marian Koshland Bioscience and Natural Resources Library, Univ. of Cal.


Yucca campestris ( Plains Yucca )
A rhizomatous, stemless Yucca, reaching a maximum size of 40 inches. The rosettes are borne in large clumps up to 4 + feet wide. It is native to deep sand dunes on the plains of western Texas.
The linear leaves are up to 26 x 0.2 inches in size. They are blue-green with a narrow white margin that has a few fine fibers.
The pale green flowers, up to 5 inches long, are borne on a tall spike, up to 5 feet tall, during early summer.
Hardy zones 7a to 9 ( possibly even 6 ).

Yucca cernua
Forms a foliage clump, reaching up to 3 x 3.5 feet.
Hardy zones 8 to 10.

Yucca coahuilensis ( Coahuila Yucca )
A small Yucca, reaching up to 2 x 3 feet, that is native to Coahuila state in northern Mexico. Some records include: 2 years - 20 inches.
The blue-green leaves, up to 24 x 1.6 inches in size, have white hairs along the margins.
The white flowers are borne on a stalk up to 5 feet in height.
Hardy zones 8 +

Yucca constricta ( Buckley's Yucca )
Reaches up to 3.2 x 3 feet, with very narrow blue-green leaves up to 26 x 1 inches, that are margined with white filamentose hairs. With age it may develop a trunk up to 2 feet high. This clumping Yucca is native to western and central Texas and neighboring northern Mexico. Very old plants may form a trunk up to 1 foot high.
The large, greenish-white flowers are borne on a spike up to 10 feet high.
Hardy zones 7a+ ( tolerating 0 F )

Yucca decipens ( Dragon Yucca )
A branched tree Yucca, closely related to Yucca filifera, reaching up to 30 x 12 feet, that is native to high elevations of central Mexico. Some records include: 10 years - 3 feet.
The very stiff, olive-green, spine-tipped leaves, up to 24 x 2 inches, form a dense crown.
The white flowers are borne on upright inflorescences.
Hardy zones 8b to 10 in full sun on well drained soils. If prefers a dry climate and will probably not survive the cool wet winters in the eastern U.S.

Yucca desmetiana
A small Yucca reaching up to 6 feet that is native to Mexico. It has stiff leaves that crowd the stem and are green with a purple tinge ( or often bronze in full sun ). Flowering is rare. Hardy zones 9 to 11

Yucca elata ( Soap Tree )
A small tree to 15 feet or more, with multiple stems and suckering shoots that is native from Arizona, southwest Utah to western Texas; south to Mexico.
Some records include: 10 years - 12 feet; largest on record - 33 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet; longest lived - 300 years.
Dead leaves cling dried to the stems turned downward unless pruned off.
The very narrow, grasslike leaves are up to 48 x 1 inch in size and are finely hairy edged.
The foliage is bright green at first, later turning to deeper green.
The creamy-white flowers up to 2.5 inches long are borne on a stalk up to 6.6 feet in length. They usually appear late spring into early summer.
The trunk is gray in color.
Hardy zones 6 to 11 ( tolerating as low as - 13 F ). Very difficult to transplant.
Prefers soil PH of 7 to 8.5. One clone sold by The Desert Northwest is even hardier, possibly tolerating as low as -30 F.

* photo taken by Rex King @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by F.G. Plummer @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photo

* video found on Youtube


Yucca elephantipes ( Spineless Yucca )
Also called Yucca guatemalensis. An erect small tree reaching 25 feet or more, that is native to Mexico and central America.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 50 x 25 with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The leathery, finely tooth edged leaves are up to 48 x 4 inches in size and are medium green in color.
The white flowers are borne on 3 foot high stalks in summer and fall.
The bark is reddish.
Enjoys full sun or partial shade and is hardy zones 9 to 12 tolerating as low as 15 F
Moderately salt tolerant.

* photo taken on June 22 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Feb 1 2017


Yucca faxoniana ( Carnero Yucca )
Also called Yucca carnerosana. A slow growing small tree reaching up to 20 feet that is native from southeast NM & western Texas to northern Mexico. Some records include: largest on record - 50 x 10 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The leaves are up to 60 x 3 inches in size. This Yucca bears flower clusters up to 4 feet in length every 3 or 4 years. The flower clusters weigh up to 70 pounds.
Hardy north to zone 6, it thrives on lower elevations in much of the southern Rockies Mountains, including protected sites in Denver, CO.

* historical archive photo


Yucca filamentosa ( Adam's Needle )
A typically trunkless, bushy Yucca with multiple heads, reaching a width of 5 or sometimes as much as 9 feet. Native to dry pine forests and sand dunes in the eastern U.S. north to Michigan and New Jersey; it is the hardiest Yucca and is very commonly grown. Tolerant of cooler, wetter climates than other Yuccas, it is used in landscaping in western Europe including the British Isles.
The sharp pointed leaves are filamentous and blue-green; reaching up to 36 x 4 inches in size.
The pendulous creamy-white flowers up to 3.2 inches long are borne on upright spikes up to 10 feet tall during mid to late summer. Plants look best with these spikes removed immediately after the flowers dry up.
Hardy in zones 4 to 9, tolerating as low as -30 F but definately grows best in full sun. It is even reported as hardy in Winnipeg, MB and Edmonton, Alberta ( on a protected site ). Excellent for sea shore locations on sandy soil. Drought tolerant and is not eaten by deer. The Adam's Needle also attracts butterflies.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken on Aug 2 2011 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on June 9 2012 in Ellicott City, MD
* photo taken on July 9 2013 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Aug 15 2014 @ Maryland Zoo, Baltimore, MD

* photo taken on Sep 25 2016 near Reisterstown, MD

* historical archive photos

* photo taken on June 26 2017 in Ellicott City, MD


'Bright Edge'
Smaller growing, to a maximum size of 3 x 6 feet with foliage that is rich green with bright yellow edges.
The white flowers are borne on spikes up to 6 feet high.

* photos taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Color Guard'
Dwarf with a foliage clump only reaching 3 x 4 feet. The foliage is green with a very bright glowing yellow center.
The white flowers are borne on spikes up to 6 feet high during summer.

* photos taken on Aug 2 2011 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on Nov 8 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photos taken on June 22 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photos taken on Oct 23 2012 in Harford Co., MD

* photos taken on Oct 19 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 8 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on Aug 14 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 25 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken on Nov 13 2016 in Harford Co., MD


'Garland Gold'
Reaches up to 3 x 3 feet, with bright golden-yellow leaves that are narrowly margined deep green.

'Golden Sword'
Similar to 'Bright Edge' but more vigorous with foliage even more stunning being rich deep green with a bold wide creamy yellow stripe down the middle.
Foliage clump generally reaches up to 3 x 3 feet though sometimes as much as 3 x 6 feet.
Excellent for use as a bold architectural plant with the added bonus of fragrant creamy white flowers borne on spikes up to 6 feet high during mid summer.

* photo taken on March 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photos taken on 4th of July 2010 in Washington, D.C.


* photo of unknown internet source


'Ivory'
Abundant creamy white flowers and long, narrow deep green foliage.

Yucca filifera
A large multiple trunked Yucca, reaching up to 30 feet, that is native from northeastern to central Mexico. Some records include: largest on record - 50 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 feet ( including multiple trunks ). In fact one in Valencia, Spain was recorded having a trunk diameter of 9 feet at the base.
The olive green foliage, is simiar to Yucca brevifolia but larger, to 24 x 1.5 inches in size and is edged with white, curly threads.
Creamy white flowers up to 2 inches in length are borne on large, pendulous panicles up to 5 feet in length in summer.
Hardy zone 7 to 11. No damage reported at 6 F in Oklahoma City however this Yucca is likely killed at 0 F. Very drought tolerant.

* photo of unknown internet source

* historic archive photo


Yucca glauca ( Soapweed )
A moderate growing, clump forming Yucca with trunks reaching a maximum height of only 2 feet, that is native to the western and central U.S. ( from southern Alberta and southern Saskatchewan to North Dakota; south to northeastern New Mexico to northern Texas ). It is critically endangered in the wild in Canada. It has been found in the wild in southern Manitoba but it is unknown if these are native populations. This low growing Yucca reaches a maximum foliage clump size of 3.5 x 6 feet. Some records include: 4 years - 3.5 feet.
The very narrow, tapering, blue-green evergreen leaves up to 36 x 0.7 inches in size are edged with straight thin, white filaments.
White bell shaped flowers up to 3.2 inches in length are borne on stalks up to 5 or rarely 7 feet tall in summer
Hardy zones 2b to 9, tolerating as low as - 35 F or colder. Extremely drought tolerant as well as tolerant of reflected heat. It also tolerates cooler wetter climates and is known to grow in the British Isles.

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database



Yucca gloriosa ( Moundlily Yucca )
A typically multi branched, fast growing tree reaching up to 25 feet that is native to the southeast U.S. from Florida to North Carolina. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 4 years - 4 x 4 feet; 10 years - 7 x 4 feet; largest on record - 33 x 38 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.2 feet
The lance-shaped, thin, stiff, soft-tip pointed leaves are up to 40 x 4 inches in size.
The foliage is blue-green at first aging to deep green.
The pendulous, white, bell-shaped flowers up to 4 inches in length are borne on dense, erect panicles 3 to rarely 9 feet long during late summer into autumn.
The bark is brown.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 ( zone 5 if sheltered ) however it is a tree only where winter temperatures don't go below 0 F. It requires hot, dry sunny sites to bloom well however does not enjoy intense reflected heat such as off walls and concrete. It tolerates partial shade but can develop chlorosis on alkaline soils.
It thrives on sandy soils at seaside locales and is surprisingly tolerant of the cooler moist summers of the British Isles if planted on very well drained soil.
It is recommended to remove flower stems when pruning is none. Dried old foliage should also be pruned off.
Propagation of cultivars is from root cuttings taken in winter.

* photo taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, DC

* historical archive photo


'Glauca'
Foliage is light blue

* photo taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* photo taken on Oct 15 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Medio-striata'
Leaves have bold white stripe in center.

'Nobilis'
The bluish foliage is flushed red on the outside and is sometimes twisted.

'Spotted Tiger'

* photos taken on Mar 23 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD




'Variegata'
Foliage has yellow cream edges and stripes.

* photos taken on Mar 28 2014 in Columbia, MD


Yucca harrimaniae ( New Mexico Yucca )
A very small Yucca, reaching up to 2 x 3 feet, with stiff, narrow, blue-green leaves.
It is native to the southwest U.S. ( from Utah to southeast Colorado; south to eastern Nevada to northern Arizona ). It is great for the rock garden.
Older plants may form a trunk up to 1 foot high.
The margins of the leaves, up to 20 x 1.5 inches, are covered in white hairs.
The creamy-white, bell-shaped flowers are borne on a spike up to 3 feet high, that arises from the dense, compact rosette. The flowers are borne late spring to early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( possibly even 4 on protected sites ) on a hot sunny site with sand or very well drained soil.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos


Yucca linearifolia ( Fineleaf Yucca )
A moderate growing, branched small tree, reaching around 8 x 4 feet, that is native to a tiny area just south of Monterrey, Mexico. Some records include: 4 years - 3.3 feet; 7 years - 5 feet. It is among the most beautiful of all Yuccas.
The thick, narrow leaves, up to 24 x 0.3 inches, that is pale green to blue-green.
Slender white flowers are borne in spikes up to 5 feet in length in autumn.
Hardy zones 7 to 10. Tolerant of moist climates if on very well drained soil.

Yucca madrensis ( Sierra Madre Yucca )
A very vigorous Yucca, reaching up to 8 feet, that is native to mountains of Chihuahua & Sierra Madre in Mexico. Some records include: 3.3 feet in 2.5 years.
The stiff, blue-green, strap-shaped leaves, up to 32 inches in length, form a dense crown atop a single trunk.
Hardy zones 7+ ( tolerating 0 F ) thriving in temperate climates. Native to moist, shady sites, it will tolerate more shade than other Yuccas. Drought tolerant.

Yucca mohavensis ( Mohave Yucca )
Also called Yucca schidigera. An erect tree, reaching up to 15 x 8 feet, with a few stout branches that is native from southeast California to southern Nevada; south into the Baja Peninsula at elevations up to 4500 feet.
Some records include: largest on record - 30 x 8 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The dark green leaves are up to 60 x 3 inches in size.
The flowers are borne in clusters up to 18 inches in length.

* photo taken by Anthony Baniaga @ CalPhotos

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* historical archive photo


Yucca nana ( Dwarf Yucca )
A miniature Yucca, forming a stoloniferous clump, up to 1 x 1.5 foot, that is native to the Utah-Colorado border. It is closely related to Yucca harrimaniae but is smaller. The Dwarf Yucca looks great in the dry rock garden. Very old plants may form a clump of rosettes totalling up to 3.3 feet across.
The stiff, erect, very narrow leaves, up to 8 x 0.5 inches, are bluish in color.
The leaves are covered in white filaments.
The large white flowers are borne on a spike up to 3.3 feet high during summer.
Hardy zones 5a to 9 ( 4 on protected sites ).

Yucca pallida ( Pale Yucca )
A Yucca, forming a foliage rosette up to 20 x 32 inches, that is native from central Texas to northern Mexico.
The leaves, up to 24 x 2 inches in size, are powdery blue.
Up to 100 large, creamy-white, bell-shaped flowers, up to 2.8 inches, are borne on a spike up to 8 feet high.
Hardy zones 6b+. It is shade tolerant but definately blooms better in full sun.
Hardy zones 5 to 10. Very heat tolerant as well as tolerant of alkaline soil and heavy clay if well drained. It is far hardier than it's native range suggests and is known to survive in Detroit, Michigan and on the U.S. east coast.

Yucca recurvifolia ( Weeping Yucca )
A robust, fast growing, single to multiple stemmed shrub to 5 feet or more, that is native to the southeastern U.S. ( Louisiana to Georgia ). Some records include: 10 x 8 feet with unconfirmed reports as large as 27 x 9 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet. The trunk very rarely exceeds 5 feet in height, however vigorously increases in height during the first few years, reaching up to 3 feet in 3 years..
The tapered, arching to drooping, leathery leaves up to 40 x 2.5 inches are blue-green to deep green in color.
The creamy white, large, bell shaped flowers, up to 3.5 inches, are borne in panicles up to 7 feet tall from summer to late autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 11. Very tolerant of humid summers.

* photo taken on June 10 2010 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on 4th of July 2010 in Washington, D.C.

* photo taken on Aug 20 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Sep 20 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 30 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Feb 13 2017 in Columbia, MD

* historical archive photo


'Banana Split'
The foliage is green and boldly variegated yellow in the center.
Hardy zones 7 to 9

'Cousin It'
Intense powdery-blue foliage that is more weeping than usual for the species.

'Elegans Marginata'
Foliage is edged creamy yellow.

'Hinvargas'
Yellow variegated foliage; otherwise identical to species.

* photos taken on 4th of July 2010 in Washington, D.C.


* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Variegata'
Foliage is striped dull yellow.

'Yellow Ribbons'
Reaches up to 8 feet in height.
Weeping foliage that is yellow with a blue-green margin.

Yucca rigida ( Blue Yucca )
A moderate growing, branching tree native to Mexico that can reach 12 feet or more. Some records include: largest on record - 17 x 10 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 inches.
The stiff leaves up to 36 x 1.3 inches are blue-green with yellowish teeth along the margins. The leaves persist dried long after they die forming thatch along the trunk; these leaves preferrably cut off in fire prone areas.
The small creamy white flowers are borne in late spring.
Hardy zones 6b to 11.

Yucca rostrata ( Beaked Yucca )
A moderate growing, branched small tree reaching around 10 feet that is native to the U.S. / Mexico border region ( Brewster County, Texas and Chihuahua as well as Coahuila Provinces in Mexico ). Some records include: 7 years - 4 feet; largest on record - 20 x 11 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet. It is among the most beautiful of all Yuccas.
The thick, narrow foliage reaches up to 24 x 0.5 inches in size and is sometimes minutely tooth edged. The foliage is powdery-blue.
Slender white flowers are borne in spikes up to 5 feet in length in autumn.
The flowers attract hummingbirds.
Hardy zones 5 to 10 ( tolerating as low as - 25 F ) in full sun. It is known to grow in cultivation as far north as New York State. Drought tolerant, deer and rabbit resistant.

* photo taken on 4th of July 2010 in Washington, D.C.

* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photo taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA

* photos taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.

* videos found on Youtube


'Sapphire Skies'
Vigorous growing, reaching up to 4 x 3 feet in 7 years, eventually more.
The foliage is bright silvery-blue. It is among the showiest of all foliage plants.

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* video found on Youtube


Yucca rupicola ( Twistleaf Yucca )
Reaching up to 2.5 x 3 feet, it is native to the Edwards Plateau in central Texas. It eventually colonizes and can form a clump up to 5 feet across.
The narrow olive-green leaves, up to 30 x 2.5 inches in size, become twisted with age. They are edged with minute teeth.
The greenish-white, bell-shaped flowers, up to 2.5 inches in length, are borne on stalks up to 6 feet high.
Hardy zones 7a to 9 ( 5 & 6 on protected sites ), it thrives in sun or partial shade and is very heat and alkaline soil tolerant.

Yucca schottii ( Schott' Yucca )
A moderate growing, single to multi stemmed shrub or small tree to 20 feet or more, that is native from California to southeast Nevada & northwest Arizona. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 50 x 12 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet.
The thin straight leaves, up to 40 x 2.5 inches are shiny blue-green in color.
The white rounded flowers, up to 2 inches in length are produced on inflorescences up to 40 inches tall in autumn.
The trunk is brown in color.
Hardy zones 5b to 11 ( tolerating -15 F ). Tolerant of wet soil and grows well even on the Gulf Coast and British Columbia.

Yucca schidigera ( Mojave Yucca )
A branched and clumped Yucca native to Mojave Desert of California, southern Nevada, northwest Arizona and southwest Utah, that forms a large shrub reaching a maximum size of 20 x 20 feet.
The sharp-pointed leaves, up to 60 x 2 inches are blue-green in color.
Hardy north to zone 8, tolerating as low as 0 F. Extremely drought tolerant.

* photo taken by Paul S. Bieler @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Yucca smalliana
A clumping Yucca, similar to Yucca filamentosa, that is native from southern California to Florida.
Hardy north to zone 5

Yucca thompsoniana ( Thompson's Yucca )
A medium-size shrub native to southwest Texas as well as Chihuahua and Coahuila Provinces in Mexico. It reaches a maximum size of 17 x 18 ( rarely over 10 x 4 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 2.6 feet at the base. It can reach up to 4 feet in 5 years from seed.
The serrated foliage is blue-green up to 24 x 0.5 inches in size.
The white flower spikes, up to 4 feet in length, are borne during early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 10 in full sun on well drained soil. Soak seeds in warm water for 24 hours before sowing.

* historical archive photo


Yucca torreyi ( Torrey Yucca )
A fast growing, small tree to 18 feet that is native to southern New Mexico and southwest to central Texas. Some records include: 4 years - 6 feet; 10 years - 8 feet; largest on record - 30 x 10 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet.
The yellow-green to deep green leaves are up to 60 x 4 ( rarely over 30 x 2 ) inches in size.
The white flowers, up to 4 inches in length are borne on stalks up to 4 feet in length.
Hardy north to zone 7 ( tolerating 0 F )

Yucca treculeana ( Trecule Yucca )
An imposing small tree native reaching up to 15 feet, that is native to central and western Texas and Mexico. Some records include: largest on record - 30 x 11 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The leaves are up to 52 x 3 ( rarely over 36 x 2 ) inches in size and the flowers are borne in inflorescences up to 5 inches in length.
It is hardy north to zone 7 ( zone 6 on very sheltered sites ), grows well on the Gulf Coast and has even been grown in Pittsburgh, PA.

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.

* historic archive photos


var canaliculata
More vigorous, with larger leaves, up to 5 feet in length.
It can reach up to 10 x 11 feet in just 7 years, with a trunk that can reach up to 1 foot in diameter.

Yucca whipplei ( Our Lord's Candle )
Also called Hesperoyucca whipplei. A stemless Yucca native to central and southern California, that forms a dense clump foliage that reaches up to 3 x 7 feet when not in bloom.
The stiff, rigid, narrow, lance shaped, blue-gray to blue-green, toothed, very sharp needle pointed foliage is up to 40 x 1.3 inches. The new growth is covered in woolly hairs.
The fragrant, bell shaped, creamy white flowers up to 3 inches in length are borne in dense inflorescences that reach up to 16 feet high in May and June. This plant is generally monocarpic which means it dies after flowering, though it's offsets often take its place.
Hardy zones 7 to 11 ( tolerating -2 F ) and requires a hot sunny site and well drained soil.
It tolerates intense reflected sun but also partial shade. Water monthly by giving it a deep soaking if it doesn't rain.
Propagation can be from root cuttings taken in winter. This Yucca can survive on as little as 8 inches of rain in a year.

* photo taken by Jordan Zylstra @ CalPhotos

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo

5 comments:

  1. Wonderfull flowers fotos and yucca, best regard from Belgium

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you! Feel free to check back on previous posts since I'm still adding additions photos as I take them.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow! thank you for all the great info about yuccas, I keep coming back to check details/plant hardiness. a great reference for yucca lovers as myself :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. That historic archieve photo at the end makes me wonder if an unknown plant I used to have may of been a Yucca. I got removed cause of a flower spike suddenly grew out of it so high it almost hit the telegraph wires (the plant wasnt even as tall as me though that grew that flower spike

    ReplyDelete