Wednesday, April 14, 2010

PODOCARPS

Podocarpus

A large genus of over 100 species of trees that are native to the Southern Hemisphere as well as parts of southeastern Asia, Japan and central America.
They generally prefer full sun on deep, fertile, well drained soil. Most Podocarps also have a preferance for a site with protection from excessive wind, esp. in winter. Tree forms should be trained to a single leader while young.
Propagation is from fresh seed and cuttings. Deer resistant.

* photo of unknown internet source


Podocarpus acutifolius
A slow growing, dense, small tree that is native to. Some records include: 10 years - 8 feet; largest on record - 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet; .
The prickly linear leaves, up to 1 inch in length, are yellowish-green, turning to bronze in winter.
The cones are borne on a red stalk.
Hardy zones 6 to 10, tolerating as low as 0 F, possibly lower.
Among the hardiest of all Podocarps, it is hardy in Bergen, Norway and Copenhagen, Denmark.

Podocarpus alpinus ( Tasmanian Pococarp )
A horizontal spreading shrub that is native to the mountains of Victoria, New South Wales and Tasmania in Australia. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 1 feet; 10 years - 3.3 x 6.5 feet; largest on record - 20 x 15 ( over 16 is ex. rare ) feet.
The tough, linear leaves, up to 0.5 inches in length, are very deep green above, blue-green beneath. The foliage appears very much like that of the Taxus-Yew.
The seed is contained within a fleshy red berry, up to 0.3 inches in length.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 tolerating as low as -13 F; it has been grown in zone 6 parts of Hungary. It requires light, well drained soil.

'Blue Gem'
Reaches a maximum size of 10 x 15 feet, with striking blue-green foliage.
It even survives in Michigan if sheltered.

Podocarpus annamiensis
A small tree that is native to wet forests of Hainan province in China, Burma and Vietnam. Some records include: largest on record - 55 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet. It is threatened by forest destruction in its natural range.
The linear leaves, up to 4 x 0.3 inches, are luxuriant deep green.
The scaly bark is grayish-white.
Hardy zones 10 to 11

Podocarpus coriaceus
Some records include: largest on record - 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet.

Podocarpus costaricensis
Some records include: largest on record - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.2 feet.

Podocarpus drouynianus
An erect medium size shrub that is native to Western Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 10 feet.
The linear leaves, up to 3.2 inches in length, are deep green above, paler green beneath. The leaves have a very prominent midrib.
The seeds produced singly are borne on a deep blue stalk.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 tolerating as high as 113 F. Very drought tolerant.

Podocarpus elatus ( Brown Pine )
A very fast growing, large tree that is native to Queensland and New South Wales in Australia. Some records include: 130 years - trunk diameter of 4.7 feet; largest on record - 160 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet. It makes for a very attractive landscape tree.
The leathery linear to oblong leaves, up to 10 x 0.5 ( rarely over 6 ) inches, are luxuriant glossy deep green.
The seeds produced singly are green and borne on a bluish-black stalk.
The flaky bark is dark brown.
The timber is highly valuable, especially for furniture.
Hardy zones 9 to 12

* photos of unknown internet source




* historical archive photo


Podocarpus elongatus ( Cape Yellowwood )
A slow growing, large rounded tree that is native to South Africa. Some records include: largest on record - 100 feet in height.
The linear leaves, up to 5 x 0.5 inches, are bluish-green.
The seeds are borne on a scarlet-red stalk.
The thin bark is dark gray to grayish-green.
Hardy zones 9 to 12

'Ice Blue'
The very attractive foliage is vibrant blue-gray.

* photos of unknown internet source



Podocarpus falcatus ( Outeniqua Yellowwood )
Also called Afrocarpus falcatus. A very fast growing, straight trunked, dense canopied, large tree, native to mountain forests of Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa. It is endangered in its native range.Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3.5 feet; 15 years - 50 feet; 80 years - trunk diameter of 4.8 feet; largest on record - 210 x 125 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 feet; longest lived - 1500 years. It is a top quality shade tree, barely known in the U.S. but has been used in Australia and South Africa.
The linear leaves, up to 5 x 0.3 inches, is very beautiful bluish-green turning to dull mid green.
The fruits are up to 0.7 inches.
The flaking, peeling bark is pale red-brown and purplish-brown.
The valuable timber is yellowish, however mature trees have become rare due to overexploitation.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 ( possibly even 7 in the Carolinas ) in full sun on deep, fertile, well drained soil. Despite having a very deep taproot, it requires an average yearly rainfall of 48 to 72 inches per year. This tree is a good candidate for use in the U.S. Deep South. Pruning rarely needed except to shorten over extended branches or lower limbs for clearance. Rarely bothered by insect pests or disease. Propagation is from seed which can be sown fresh after removing the fleshy coat.

* photos of unknown internet source


Podocarpus fleuryi
Also called Nagaeia fleuryi. A very ornamental, fast growing, large tree that is native to southern China, Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. It is extremely endangered in its native range. Some records include: 2nd year - 40 inches; 10 years - 10 x 4 feet; largest on record - 100 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet; .
The large, elliptical leaves, up to 7 x 2 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The stems are bright green. The bark is purplish-brown.
Hardy zones 10 to 11 ( 7 ) tolerating as low as 26 F

Podocarpus gracilior ( Fern Podocarp )
Also called Afrocarpus gracilior. A fast growing, elegant, strong branched, straight trunked, pendulous branched, large tree, native to mountain forests of Uganda, Kenya and Ethiopia. It is endangered in its native range. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 10 years - 17 x 6 feet; largest on record - 170 x 95 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet ( usually less than half that at maturity in the U.S. ).
The linear leaves, up to 4 x 0.3 inches, are glossy mid-green above, bluish-green beneath.
The fruits are up to 0.7 inches.
The bark is light gray to purplish-brown and smooth.
Its timber is valuable for fine furniture.
Hardy zones 9 to 12, tolerating as low as 20 F, and preferring full sun to partial shade on deep, fertile, well drained soil. Drought tolerant and mature trees can go without water during the summer ( better with monthly deep irrigation ). Clay and moderately salt tolerant.
Pruning rarely needed except to shorten over extended branches or lower limbs for clearance. Rarely bothered by insect pests or disease. Propagation is from seed which can be sown fresh after removing the fleshy coat.

* photos taken on Jan 3 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida





* excellent video found on Youtube


Podocarpus grayi
A large shrub to small tree that is native to rainforests at elevations up to 3000 feet, on the Cape York Peninsula of Queensland, Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 66 feet.
The alternately arranged, pendulous, narrow linear leaves, up to 10 inches in length, are deep green.
The cones are borne from the leaf axils.
Hardy zones 9 to 11. Plants from higher elevations should be used in cooler climates.

Podocarpus hallii ( Hall's Totara )
Also called Podocarpus cunninghamii. A large tree that is native to Stewart Island and South Island in New Zealand. Some records include: 10 years - 17 x 10 feet; largest on record - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 feet; longest lived - 1800 years.
The spirally arranged, linear leaves, up to 2 inches in length, are green.
The seed produced singly, are green and borne on a red stalk.
The bark exfoliates in large thin sheets.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 ( reports of 7 ), very drought tolerant.
Hardy in Bergen, Norway and Copenhagen, Denmark.

Podocarpus henkelii ( Falcate Yellowwood )
A very beautiful, very long-lived, elegant, moderate growing, dense, pyramidal large tree that is native to southeastern Africa. Some records include: 10 years - 14 x 6 feet; largest on record - 120 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet; .
The drooping, linear leaves, up to 8 ( averaging 4.5 ) inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The olive-green, waxy seeds are borne singly on a blue-green stalk.
The attractive peeling bark is khaki brown.
Hardy zones 8 to 12, preferring high rainfall climates and deep soil. Moderately drought tolerant as well as wind tolerant. It thrives in the southeastern U.S. to as far north as Savannah, GA or slightly further.

* photos of unknown internet source



Podocarpus imbricatus
Some records include: largest on record - 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.6 feet.

Podocarpus lambertii
A whorl branched, tall tree, reaching a maximum size of 80 feet, that is native to southeast Brazil and northeast Argentina. It is now rare in the wild due to forest destruction.
The crowded, spirally arranged, leathery, linear leaves, up to 1.5 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
Hardy zones 9 to 12

Podocarpus latifolius ( Broad Leaved Yellowwood )
A moderate growing, very large, dense, pyramidal tree that is native to South Africa where it is the national tree. Some records include: largest on record - 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet. Extremely long-lived, this tree will usually not exceed 50 feet within anyones lifetime.
The narrow leaves, up to 4 x 0.5 ( often half that ) inches, are glossy blue-green.
The foliage is part of the appeal of this very beautiful tree.
The fruits are pinkish-purple.
The highly valuable wood is used for furniture and paneling.
Hardy zones 10 to 11 ( tolerating 25 F ) in full sun on just about any well drained soil with moderate water. The Broad Leaved Yellowwood can tolerate moderate drought once established due to its deep root system. This tree should be experimented with in Florida where it would likely be an excellent landscape tree. It can also be grown in mediterranean climates with occasional deep waterings during summer.

* photos of unknown internet source





Podocarpus lawrencei ( Mountain Plum Pine )
A slow growing, small tree that is native to far southeastern Australia and Tasmania. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 1.5 feet ( typically 6 inches ); largest on record - 50 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.8 feet. The Mountain Plum Pine is an extremely long lived tree that can persist up to 1000 years. While it likely doesn't make a sizable tree within anyones lifetime, it does make a great hedging plant.
The linear leaves, up to 1 inch in length, are deep bluish-green.
The greenish seeds produced singly or paired are borne on a pinkish-red stalk.
Hardy zones 5 to 10 ( tolerating as high as 113 F ) in sun or shade.
It can be grown from cutting or seed.

'Purple King'
Moderately fast growing and very spreading in habit, reaching up to 6 x 17 feet in 10 years. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 1.5 feet.
The foliage is dull green, turning to purple during winter.

Podocarpus macrophyllus ( Maki Pine )
Also called Japanese Yew Pine. A fast growing, handsome, strong-branched, semi-pendulous, dense, medium-size tree native to much of southern China and Japan. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 3 years - 3 feet; 20 years - 30 feet ( average ); largest on record - 82 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.6 feet. A popular ornamental tree in China where very old trees may be found on old temple grounds.
Maki Pine can be sheared and used as a tall hedge.
The spirally-arranged, leathery, linear leaves are up to 5 ( rarely 8 ) inches in length. The foliage is glossy deep green above, bluish-green beneath.
The fruits are borne on a purplish-red stalk.
The lightly-fissured bark is light gray to brownish-gray. The highly valuable timber is both water and termite resistant.
Hardy zones 7 to 11, the foliage is burned at 11 F and trees are severely injured at -3 F. It will thrive in full sun to partial shade on just about any deep, fertile, well drained soil. Very drought tolerant and more heat tolerant than most trees in the Podocarpus genus though will also grow in the Pacific Northwest. Rarely bothered by insect pests or disease. Propagation is from seed sown upon ripening ( takes up to 2 years ) or hardwood cuttings taken during late summer.

* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos of unknown internet source

* photos taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* videos found on Youtube



'Edgefield'
More hardy by at least 5 F. May survive in zone 6 on very sheltered sites.

'Maki'
Moderate growing, columnar in habit, and more compact than regular Podocarpus macrophyllus,
Some records include: fastest growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 12 x 3.3 feet; largest on record - 35 x 15 feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches.
The linear leaves, up to 3 x 0.2 inches, are glossy deep green.

Podocarpus macrostachys
A large tree native to Costa Rica.
Some records include: largest on record - 133 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.

Podocarpus matadae 'reichii'
A very vigorous large tree, reaching a maximum size of 100 feet, that is native from southern Mexico to Costa Rica. It is endangered in the wild due to forest destruction.
The very long, linear leaves are up to 6 inches in length.
The attractive foliage is intense, verdant, luxuriant bright green.
Hardy zones 8b to 10. Has been grown in Cornwall, England.

Podocarpus nagi ( Nagi )
Also called Nageia nagi. A moderate growing, strong and horizontally branched, medium-size to large tree that is native to southeastern China, Japan and Taiwan. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.5 feet. Very long-lived, this tree is known to survive up to 1000 years in age.
The oppositely arranged, oval leaves, up to 4 x 1 inches in size, are glossy deep green, paler green beneath.
The singular, rounded female cones, up to 0.5 inches, ripen during late summer.
The male cones, up to an inch in length, are borne single or in small clusters.
The smooth bark is reddish to grayish-brown.
Hardy zones 7 to 10, tolerating as low as -4 F, requiring moist, well drained soil as well as 4 or more months of hot humid summer per year. It thrives in the southeastern U.S. Moderately salt tolerant and very drought and clay tolerant.

* historic archive photos


Podocarpus neriifolius ( Blackleaf Podocarp )
A very rare, moderate growing tree that is native to rainforests of New Guinea, Borneo and Queensland, Australia where it is endangered. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 150 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet; .
The leathery, linear leaves, up to 10 x 1 inches, are deep green.
The seeds produced singly are green and borne on a red stalk.
The flaking bark is light brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 12, moderately drought tolerant.

* photo of unknown internet source


Podocarpus nivalis ( Alpine Totara )
A slow growing, dense, medium-size shrub that is native to mountains of New Zealand. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 inches; 10 years - 3.3 x 6.5 feet; largest on record - 10 x 17 feet. Some of the lower growing forms make excellent groundcover.
The rowed or spirally arranged, leathery, linear to oblong leaves, up to 0.7 inches in length, are olive-green.
The seeds produced singly or paired are green and borne on a red stalk.
Hardy zones 6 to 10, tolerating as low as -13 F - has been grown in zone 5 Hungary with no protection. It is also hardy in Bergen, Norway and Copenhagen, Denmark. Very tolerant of alkaline soil but not heavy clay.

Podocarpus nubigenus
An attractive large tree that is native to Chile. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.6 feet ( usually about half that ). It is very closely related to Podocarpus totara and also closely resembles it in appearance.
The spirally arranged, stiff, sharp-pointed, linear leaves, up to 2 inches in length, are rich glossy green above, bluish beneath.
The seeds produced singly or paired are green and borne on a red to violet stalk.
The very rot resistant, hard wood is highly valuable.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( tolerating as low as -13 F ), thrives in England as well as the Pacific Northwest from British Columbia to Oregon. It requires cool summers, a very wet climate and a site protected from excessive wind to grow well.

Podocarpus rumphii
A moderate growing, large tree that is native to tropical southeastern Asia, including Malaysia, Indonesia, New Guinea, the Phillipines and the Solomon Islands. Some records include: largest on record - 133 feet.
The thick, leathery, stiff, linear leaves, up to 10 x 0.7 inches, are deep red at first, turning to deep green.
The seeds are borne singly or paired at the ends of bright red stalks.
The smooth bark is reddish-brown.
Its timber is highly valuable and is resistant to marine borers.
Hardy zones 9 to 11

Podocarpus salignus ( Willow Podocarp )
An moderate growing, elegant, slightly pendulous, pyramidal, medium-sized tree that is native to mountains of central Chile where it is endangered. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 2 feet; 20 years - 20 x 10 feet; largest on record - 82 x 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet; largest on Ireland - 66 feet.
It makes an excellent landscape tree and is now being planted in parks in Chile.
The willow-like, narrow leaves, up to 7 inches in length, are glossy deep blue-green above, paler beneath.
The fibrous reddish-brown bark peels off in strips.
The wood is valued for furniture and construction.
The seeds produced singly or paired are green and borne on a red to violet stalk.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( tolerating -13 F ), preferring cool moist mulched soil. It prefers cool humid summers and does not grow in the eastern U.S. Tolerant of pollution and inner city conditions.

* photo of unknown internet source


Podocarpus spinulosus
A spreading, medium-sized shrub that is native to New South Wales in Australia. It was once common on the north shore of Sydney Harbor. Some records include: 10 years - feet; largest on record - 15 x 6 ( rarely over 8 ) feet. It is typically found as a forest understory shrub in the wild.
The sharply pointed, narrow linear leaves, up to 3.2 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The purplish-black cones, up to 0.8 inches in length, are borne singly at the ends of bluish-black stalks.
The shredded bark is reddish-brown.
Its timber is highly valuable and is resistant to marine borers.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 preferring partial shade on a site protected from excessive wind.

Podocarpus thevetiifolia
Some records include: largest on record - 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.3 feet.

Podocarpus totara ( Totara )
A fast growing, extremely long-lived, massive trunked, dense, conical ( eventually rounded ), large tree that is native to New Zealand. Some records include:
20 years - 40 x 10 feet; 100 years - trunk diameter of 5.5 feet; largest on record - 185 feet with a trunk diameter of 21 feet; largest in British Isles - 63 feet ( so far ); longest lived - 1800+ years.
The leathery, sharp-pointed, linear leaves, up to 1.3 inch in length, are deep green.
The seeds are borne singly at the ends of reddish stalks.
The shredded bark is reddish-brown.
Its timber is highly valuable and is resistant to marine borers.
Hardy zones 7 to 11 in cool maritime climates, thriving especially well in southwest British Columbia and milder parts of Scotland.

* photos of unknown internet source



'Aureus'
A smaller tree, only growing about a foot per year and reaching up to 8.5 feet in 10 years, with golden-yellow foliage.

* photo of unknown internet source


Podocarpus usambarensis
Also called Afrocarpus usambarensis. A moderate growing, straight trunked, large tree, native to forests in the Mitumba mountains of Rwanda and Uganda. It is endangered in its native range. Some records include: largest on record - 250 feet in height. It is Africa's largest tree.
The linear leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are deep green.
The attractive bark flakes off in strips.
Hardy zones 9b to 11

RELATED PLANTS

DACRYCARPUS

Dacrycarpus dacrydioides ( Kahikatea Tree )
An upright, large tree that is native to New Zealand.
Some records include: 10 years - 10 x 4 feet.
The feathery foliage is bronze.
Hardy zones 8 in full sun and thrives in wet swampy conditions.

* photo of unknown internet source


DACRYDIUM

Dacrydium cupressinum

* photos of unknown internet source


* historical archive photo


Dacrydium franklinii
A massive increasingly rare, very large tree that is native to the rainforests of Tasmania.

* historic archive photo

* videos found on Youtube




Dacrydium elatum
Some records include: largest on record - 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.6 feet.

DIELSMA

Dielsma archeri
A rare, spreading shrub to small tree, native to high mountains of western Tasmania that resembles Juniper in appearance. Some records include: 10 years - 2.2 x 3.1 feet.
The tiny scale-like leaves are blue-gray.
Hardy zones 9 in partial shade. It can be grown in the British Isles.

HALOCARPUS

Halocarpus bidwillii
Also called Dacrydium bidwillii. A very vigorous, small tree, reaching up to 40 feet, that is native to New Zealand where it is very rare.
Some records include: fastest growth rate - 3 feet; 10 years - 12 x 6 feet.
Hardy zones 8 in full sun.

Halocarpus kirkii
Also called Dacrydium kirkii. A slow growing tree, reaching up to 75 feet, that looks alot like a Podocarpus and is native to New Zealand.
Some records include: 10 years - 8 x 5 feet.
The foliage is bright green at first, turning to gray-green.
Hardy zones 9 in full sun in a cool climate, it needs lots of water just like a Taxodium would.

LAGAROSTROBUS

Lagarostrobus franklinii ( Huon Pine )
Also called Dacrydium franklinii. An extremely attractive, slow growing, small tree, reaching up to 45 feet, that is native to wet rainforests in the southwest corner of Tasmania. Some records include: 10 years - 8 x 4 feet; largest on record - 100 + feet. It is among the worlds longest lived trees, surviving up to 2000 years or more.
The branches have long weeping tips.
The foliage is deep green.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 10 F ) in partial shade. It thrives in milder parts of Scotland.

LEPIDOTHAMNUS

Lepidothamnus laxifolius
The worlds shortest groundcover which creeps on the ground. It looks like a Calluna with tiny leaves.
The foliage is bright green, turning brown during winter.
The stems are wiry.
Hardy zones 8 in partial shade, requiring wet soil.

'Blue Form'
Dense in habit, with blue foliage that turns purple during winter.
Some records include: 10 years - 8 x 12 inches.

MANOAO

Manoao colensoi ( New Zealand Silver Pine )
Also called Lagostrobus colensoi. It is the lone species in this ancient genus.
It is a slow growing, conical tree that is native to New Zealand where it is endangered.
Some records include: 10 years - 5 x 4 feet; largest on record - 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet; largest in England - 30 feet.
The juvenile leaves, up to 0.5 inches, are green.
The adult leaves are scale-like and compressed to the stems.
The small, red male cones are borne abundantly at the stem tips.
The large plated bark is brown-gray.
The wood is used for making furniture.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 on shady sites with moist, fertile soil.
It can be propagated from half-hardened cuttings or seed.

MICROCACHRYS

Microcachrys tetragona
The lone species in the genus, it forms an attractive, low growing shrub resembling Calluna in appearance, that is native to windy mountaintops in Tasmania, formerly southeastern Australia and New Zealand. Some records include: 10 years - 1 x 3.3 feet; largest on record - 2 x 10 feet.
The oppositely-arranged, overlapping, thick leaves, up to 0.7 inches in length, are deep green.
The oblong cones, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne on female plants. They are red.
They ripen during late summer and look like Raspberries.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 ( reports of 5 ) in full sun to partial shade on consistently moist, well drained soil to swampy soil. Thrives in the Pacific Northwest and the British Isles where humidity is high. It is known to have survived the unusual severe winter of 1963 in London, England.
It can be propagated from seed stratified at around 40 F ( can use the refridgerater ) for 2 to 3 weeks before sowing. Semi-ripe cuttings root easily.

MICROSTROBUS

Microstrobus fitzeraldii
A small shrub, that is native to the Blue Mountains west of Sydney where it is highly endangered. Less than 300 plants remain in the wild. Some records include: 10 years - 4 x 6 feet; largest on record - 10 x 10 feet. It makes a good container plant.
The pendulous branches bear tiny leaves that are blue-gray. The foliage is aromatic.
The oval male cones, up to 0.3 inches in length, are borne singly at the tips.
The female cones are much smaller, up to 0.15 inches.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in partial shade ( morning sun and afternoon shade preferred ) on consistently moist soil. It should be adapted to the Pacific Northwest and the British Isles. It is easy to grow from cuttings.

* photo of unknown internet source


Microstrobus niphophilus
An evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 15 feet, that is native to mountains of Tasmania.
The densely-arranged, thick, tiny, oval leaves are deep green.
The rounded, terminal, male cones are up to 0.3 inches in length.
The pendant female cones are much smaller, to 0.15 inches.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( est ) on consistent moist to wet soil in cool maritime climates.

PRUMNOPITYS
A genus of 8 species of coniferous trees ( formerly included in Podocarpus ) that
are native to the moist regions of the Southern Hemisphere. They thrive in sun or shade on well drained soil. Propagation is from heeled cuttings taken during summer and early fall or seed.

Prumnopitys amara
A straight buttressed trunked, large evergreen tree that is native to New Guinea, Indonesia, the Phillipines and Queensland in Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 200 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The linear leaves, up to 5 x 1 inches in length, are glossy rich green above, paler beneath.
The wrinkled fruit, up to 1 inch across, are reddish, turning to deep purple.
The highly valuable timber is used in the making of furniture.
Hardy zones 8 to 10

Prumnopitys andinus ( Chilean Plum Yew )
A rare, handsome, slow growing, sweeping branched, evergren tree that is native to the high Andes Mountains in southern Chile where it has become endangered. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 3 feet; 20 years - 20 x 13 feet; 125 years - 66 x 62 feet with a trunk diameter of 5.3 feet ( Australia ); largest on record - 100 x 62 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.6 feet. It thrives in Englands maritime climate and trees have already exceeded 40 feet. It makes an excellent ornamental tree as well as hedge for cool summer climates.
The spirally arranged, flattened, linear leaves, up to 2 inches in length, are deep blue-green above, paler beneath. The foliage resembles that of Taxus Yews.
The edible, fleshy, rounded fruit resembling that of the Olive are green ripening to yellow.
The smooth bark is orange and gray.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 requiring cool summer maritime climates. Young trees should be pruned to a single leader. The seeds may take up to 4 years to germinate and even then only 10 percent typically do unless they are pretreated. It continues to decline in the wild as natural stands are not regenerating.

An excellent external website link on preserving this fine tree for future generations ( http://forums.forestresearch.gov.uk/newsrele.nsf/web-allbysubject/8EF49E28F1FD5264802571CE0044B3F8 ).

* photo of unknown internet source

* historical archive photos


Prumnopitys ferruginea ( Miro )
A striking, slow growing, columnar, evergreen tree that is native to South Island in New Zealand. Some records include: 5 years - 7 x 3 feet; 28 years - 32 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 inches; largest on record - 100 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.5 feet.
The linear leaves, up to 1.3 inches in length, are deep green. The foliage remembles that of Cephalotaxus.
The fleshy, scarlet-red fruits are poisonous for people to eat but are relished by birds.
The furrowed bark is blackish-brown. Its timber is highly valuable and now rare due to overharvesting.
Hardy zones 8 to 10

* photo of unknown internet source


Prumnopitys ladei
A slow growing, straight, tall, evergreen tree that is native to montane rainforest in a tiny mountainous area in northeast Queensland in Australia where it is now rare. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 0.5 inches diameter growth per year; largest on record - 150 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet; oldest known tree - 900 years. It is sometimes used as an indoor plant.
The ferny, blunt-tipped linear leaves, up to 0.7 inches in length, are glossy mid-green. The foliage closely resembles that of Taxus Yews.
The rounded fruits are glaucous deep-purple.
The smooth to papery flaking bark is reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 in sun or shade.

Prumnopitys taxifolia ( New Zealand Black Pine )
Also called Podocarpus spicatus. A slow growing, slender, pendulous, large, evergreen tree that is native to high mountainous areas in New Zealand. Older trees tend to become dome shaped. Some records include: 5 years - 7 feet; largest on record - 200 x 80 ( now extremely rate over 100 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 9 feet; longest lived- 1000+ years.
The linear leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are bronzed, turning to mid-green above, blue-white beneath.
The bluish-black fruits are borne in clusters.
The bark is gray. This is an important timber tree in its native range.
Hardy zones 8 to 10. Very drought tolerant.

* photos of unknown internet source

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