Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Wisteria

A genus of vigorous twining woody vines that are part of the Legume family that are usually grown for their attractive flowers.

* photos of unknown internet source



* historic archive photo


Wisteria floribunda ( Japanese Wisteria )
A very rapid growing, deciduous, twining ( clockwise ), woody vine, reaching a maximum height of 82 ( rarely over 65 ) feet, that is native to Korea and central & southern Japan. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 22 feet. May be slow to establish, later becoming very vigorous.
The pinnate leaves, up to 15 inches in length, are composed of up to 11 to 19 leaflets, up to 4 ( rarely over 3 ) inches in length. The foliage is bright green.
The fragrant, violet-blue flowers, up to 0.8 inches long, are borne in panicles, up to 2 feet in length, during mid-spring with the emerging foliage.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun on deep, fertile, well drained soil. In cooler climates it will bloom much better with a hot sunny southern exposure. Pruning to contain can be done in summer as well as late winter. During late winter prune plants on trellesis and arches by cutting long shoots back to 2 or 3 buds. While regular Wisteria sinensis can be propagated from seed, the cultivars are easily reproduced from layering during summer. Mice may feed on the roots and sometimes even kill young plants.

* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum

* photo of unknown internet source



'Alba'
Fragrant white flowers.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis ( havlis.cz )


'Longissima Alba'
Fragrant, white flowers borne on long pendulous racemes up to 24 inches in length; otherwise identical to species.

'Multiju'
Also called 'Macrobotrys'. Very fragrant, violet-purple flowers borne in very long drooping racemes, up to 6 feet in length.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken by Milan Havlis ( havlis.cz )


'Pink Ice'

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Rosea'
Very fragrant pink flowers.

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken by Milan Havlis ( havlis.cz )


'Royal Purple'
Foliage is bronze at first.
The bright purple flowers are borne on racemes up to 16 inches in length.

'Violacea Plena'
Also called Black Dragon. Fragrant, double, violet-blue flowers; otherwise identical to species.

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken by Milan Havlis ( havlis.cz )


'White with Blue Eye'

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


Wisteria x formosa
A deciduous, twining, woody vine, reaching a maximum height of 133 feet, that is the hybrid between Wisteria floribunda and W. sinensis.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 9 to 15 narrow oval leaflets. The foliage is bright green.
The very fragrant, violet-blue flowers are borne in racemes, up to 12 inches, during spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun on just about any soil. In cooler climates it will bloom much better with a hot sunny southern exposure. Pruning to contain can be done in summer as well as late winter. During late winter prune plants on trellesis and arches by cutting long shoots back to 2 or 3 buds.
It is easily reproduced from layering during summer.

Wisteria frutescens ( American Wisteria )
A very vigorous, deciduous, twining, woody vine, reaching a maximum height of 60 feet, that is native to the eastern U.S. ( from eastern Oklahoma to northern Missouri to northern Illinois to far southern Michigan to northeast Kentucky to central North Carolina; south to eastern Texas to northern Florida ). It is rare in most of its range and endangered in Oklahoma, Indiana and Michigan. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10 feet ( still far less than Wisteria sinensis ).
The pinnate leaves, up to 12 inches in length, are composed of up to 15 leaflets, up to 3.2 inches in size. The foliage is bright green, late turning to luxuriant deep green. The foliage turns to yellow in autumn.
The fragrant, pale lilac-purple flowers, up to 0.6 inches in length, are borne in panicles, up to 12 inches in length, all summer long and often on the same years growth.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( may survive in zone 4 however will dieback to the ground in most winters ) in full sun to partial shade. The flower buds are hardy to -15 F. Deer and drought tolerant. Cultivars are propagated from dormant wood cuttings.

* photo taken on Aug 12 2016 in Howard Co., MD


'Amethyst Falls'
Attractive glossy deep green foliage and very profuse, intense blue flowers that are densely born on racemes, up to 8 inches in length, beginning mid to late spring and continuing to bloom on new growth throughout the summer. May suffer occasional winter dieback in zone 5 however prune off dead wood during spring and it will spring back to life.

* photo taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photo taken on May 1 2010 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC


‘Bayou 2 O’Clock’
Profuse blue flowers beginning at a young age.

'Longwood Purple'
Deep purple flowers; otherwise identical to species.

'Nivea'
Pure white ( centered yellow ) flowers are densely born on racemes, up to 10 inches in length, beginning late spring and continuing to bloom on new growth throughout the summer.

Wisteria macrostachys ( Kentucky Wisteria )
A twining woody vines reaching up to 25 feet or more, that is native to the southeastern U.S. ( from Oklahoma to Missouri to Illinois to KY; south to Texas to Louisiana ).
The pinnate leaves are composed of usually 9 glossy deep green leaflets.
The light purple flowers are borne in racemes, up to 12 inches in length, during late spring into early summer. It blooms at a very young age, often in the 2nd or 3rd year.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 ( most cold hardy of the Wisterias ). Kentucky Wisteria prefers full sun on a deep, rich, moist, well-drained soil that high in organic matter; however is very soil tolerant and easy to grow. It is more tolerant of wet sites than other Wisteria.

'Aunt Dee'
Fast growing with fragrant light purple flowers in clusters up to 12 inches in length.
Hardy zones 4 to 8, it even flowers after -35 F.

‘Blue Moon’
A very vigorous woody vine, growing at rates reaching up to 20 feet per year.
It is also a very prolific bloomer, with the bi-colored, blue flowers in clusters up to 12 inches in length, often appearing 2 to 3 times during the year.
It is among the only Wisteria to reliably flower as far north as zone 3 ( however in Alberta zone 3 it is reported to be reduced to almost a perennial ).
This cultivar was specifically selected in Minnesota for cold hardiness. It is the most reliable bloomer in cold climates, even blooming after -40 F!

'Clara Mack'
Showy white flowers on very large, hanging clusters; otherwise identical to species.

Wisteria sinensis ( Chinese Wisteria )
A very fast growing to invasive, deciduous, twining, woody vine, reaching a maximum height of 165 feet, that is native to China.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - feet; largest trunk diameter at base - 4 feet; largest trunk diameter at 3 feet above ground - 2.2 feet.
One vines was reported to be 500 feet long and the entire plant covered an acre and weighted 1 ton, this is among the largest vines ever recorded.
In much of the southeastern U.S, the Chinese Wisteria has shown invasive tendencies spreading into wild areas, unless you live in an urban area where it already occurs, it is recommended to use the native Wisteria which are easier to control and often have the additional attraction of a longer bloom season.
The pinnate leaves, up to 12 inches in length, are composed of up to 11 ( 7 to 13 ) oval leaflets, up to 4 x 1 inches. The foliage is coppery at first, turning to bright green during summer, yellowish-green during autumn.
The non-fragrant, pinkish-purple flowers are borne in drooping racemes, up to 24 inches in length, during mid-spring before the foliage emerges.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 ( most cultivars are 5 to 9 ) in full sun on just about any moist, well drained soil. In cooler climates it will bloom much better with a hot sunny southern exposure. Pruning to contain can be done in summer as well as late winter. During late winter prune plants on trellesis and arches by cutting long shoots back to 2 or 3 buds.
While regular Wisteria sinensis can be propagated from seed, the cultivars are easily reproduced from layering during summer.


* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Oct 15 2011 in Baltimore, MD


* photos taken on May 5 2014 in Elkridge, MD

* photos taken on May 5 2015 in Elkridge, MD

* photos taken on May 9 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Alba'
Strongly fragrant, white flowers in drooping racemes, up to 2 feet in length.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis ( havlis.cz )


'Black Dragon'
Double deep purple flowers.

'Blue Sapphire'
A dwarf slow growing form, only reaching up to 15 feet, making it an excellent choice for trellises and lattice work ( unlike regular W. sinensis which can bring the while thing down ). It flowers at a young age with abundant, fragrant, deep pinkish-purple flowers.

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Caroline'
Deep purple flowers; otherwise identical to species.

'Jako'
Very fragrant pure white flowers.

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Plena'
Double pinkish-purple flowers.

'Prolific'
Also known as ‘Oosthoeks Variety'. Intensely blue flowers. Very profuse flowering, even at a very young age. The flowering season is very early, often before the foliage emerges during spring.

* photo of unknown internet source


'Rosea'
Pink flowers in racemes up to 1 foot in length, otherwise similar.

'Southern Belle'
Bright purple flowers appear during late spring, repeating mid summer, also sporadically through the remainder of the growing season.

Wisteria venusta
A rapid growing, deciduous, twining, woody vine, reaching up to 23 feet in 5 years and an eventual maximum height of 50 feet, that is native to eastern China and Japan.
The pinnate leaves, up to 20 inches in length, are composed of up to 13 ovate leaflets, up to 6.4 x 2 inches in size. The foliage is bright green.
The pure white flowers, up to 1.4 inches, are borne in racemes, up to 6 inches, during late spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

'Violacea'
Violet flowers

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