Friday, January 23, 2015

Lion's Tail

Leonotis leonurus
A massive, fast growing, shrubby perennial, reaching up to 9 x 6 feet, that is native to South Africa.
The narrow leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are downy, mid-green.
The bright orange flowers, up to 2 inches long, are borne in whorls along the stems during autumn.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( tolerating 14 F with deep winter mulch ) in full sun on fertile, well drained soil. Propagation is from cutting or seed sown during spring.

* photos taken on Oct 22 2013 in Towson, MD

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC


'Albiflora'
Also called 'Snow Tiger'. White flowers, otherwise identical.

Friday, January 9, 2015

Spring Beauty

Claytonia virginica
A bulbous perennial, reaching up to 6 inches, and is native to rich woods and bottomlands in eastern North America ( from eastern Nebraska to northeast Minnesota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Cape Croker, Ontario to Niagara Falls, Ontario to far southeast Quebec to Nova Scotia; south to northeast Texas to central Georgia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant in the Canard River Valley as well as around Point Pelee, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit during that time. Similar Claytonia caroliniana is found further north in Ontario to Thunder Bay to Wawa to Haliburton.
The fleshy, linear leaves, up to 5.5 x 0.8 inches in size, are bright green.
The pink flowers, up to 0.8 inches wide, are borne during early to mid spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, requires summer shade even though dormant. It prefers light, humus-rich, well drained soil.

* photos taken on Apr 18 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 21 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 23 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken by Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken @ Middle Patuxent, Clarksville, MD on Apr 24 2015

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

Georgia Calamint

Clinopodium georgianum
An upright, semi-evergreen shrubby perennial, reaching a maximum size of 2 x 5 feet, that is native to the southeastern U.S. ( from Louisiana to central Alabama to North Carolina; south to far northern Florida ). Originally somewhat common on sandy longleaf pine flatlands, it has been ravaged by habitat loss. Currently endangered in North Carolina and Florida.
The aromatic, rounded leaves are bright green.
The very abundant, bright pink flowers are borne late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil. Drought tolerant and deer resistant. Cut back hard after flowering.

* photo taken on Oct 23 2014 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash., DC

Corn Lily

Clintonia

Clintonia andrewsiana
A clumping perennial, reaching up to 20 inches in height, that is native to moist coniferous forests from southwest Oregon to central California.
The leaves, up to 10 x 5 inches in size,
The deep red flowers are borne during late spring.
They are followed by bluish-black berries up to 0.5 inches long.
Hardy zones 7b to 9 in partial shade on moist, humus-rich soil. It thrives in maritime climates.

Clintonia borealis ( Corn Lily )
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 16 inches in height, that is native to cool, moist forests of northeastern North America ( from eastern Manitoba to Armstrong, Ontario to Chapleau, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to Minnesota to northern Indiana to North Carolina...not on the Atlantic Coastal Plain south of New York City ).
The 2 to 5 smooth-edged, elliptical or oblong leaves, up to 15 x 5.5 ( rarely over 12 x 3 ) inches in size, are glossy deep green.
The hanging greenish-yellow flowers, up to 0.6 inches long, are borne 3 to 8 atop an erect stem during late spring.
They are followed by rounded, bright blue berries up to 0.4 inches wide.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 in partial to full shade on light, humus-rich soil.

Clintonia umbellulata ( Speckled Wood-Lily )
A rhizomatous, dense, clumping perennial, reaching up to 16 inches in height, that is native to moist forest and swamps in eastern North America ( from central Ohio to western New York; south to eastern Tennessee to northern Georgia ).
The oblong leaves, up to 12 x 4 inches in size, are glossy bright green.
The fragrant flowers, up to 0.5 inches long, are borne on dense umbels during late spring.
They are followed by black berries.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, fertile, acidic, humus-rich, well drained soil. Propagation is from division or seed during autumn.

* photo taken by Mark A. Garland @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Clintonia uniflora ( Bluebead Clintonia )
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to that is native to western North America ( from Glacier Bay, Alaska to Mackenzie, British Columbia to Jasper and Banff, Alberta; south to northern California to Idaho to western Montana ).
The leaves, up to 6 x 2.5 inches in size,
The flowers, up to 0.8 inches in length, are borne during late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in partial shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil.

* historical archive photo

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Great Lakes Wheat Grass

Agropyron psammophilum ( Great Lakes Wheat Grass )
Also called Elymus lanceolatus subsp psammophilus. A very attractive, rhizomatous, fast spreading, perennial grass, reaching up to 3 feet in height, that is native to sheltered sand dunes along Lake Superior, Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. One the Canadian side, it is found from Manitoulin Island and Dorca's Bay ( near Tobermory ) south to Grand Bend along the Lake Huron shoreline. In its natural habitat, it is important for dune stabilization. It is endangered in the wild and is rarely found in cultivation. It has good forage value for livestock.
Hardy zones 5 to 6 in full sun on sandy, very well drained soil. Prefers soil PH 6.5 +. It is drought tolerant and moderately salt tolerant.

* photo taken on Aug 30 2013 in Grand Bend, Ontario

Monday, January 5, 2015

Muehlenbeckia

Muehlenbeckia

Muehlenbeckia axillaris
A moderate growing, semi-evergreen groundcover shrub, reaching only 6 inches in height.
The small, oval leaves are deep green. The leaves are evergreen into zone 6.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil. It is drought tolerant. Very heat and humidity tolerant, it thrives in the southeastern U.S. Tolerates light foot traffic. It is easily propagated from layering as the stems naturally self layer.

* photos taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

Money Plant

Lunaria

Lunaria annua ( Money Plant )
A biennial, reaching up to 3.3 feet in height, that is native to southern Europe. It has naturalized locally in old fields, roadsides and open woods in eastern North America to as far north as Tobermory, Ontario and Quebec City.
The broad, toothed leaves, up to 4 x 2.5 inches in size, are mid-green.
The fragrant, pink to purple flowers are borne during late spring.
They are followed by papery, flat, oval, seed pods, up to 2 inches wide, that are great for use in floral arrangements.
Hardy zones 4 + in full sun to part shade on just about any well drained soil. Sow seeds very early in spring.

* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photos taken on Apr 27 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Alba'
White flowers.

Lunaria redidiva
A perennial, up to 4.5 feet in height, that is native to mountain woodlands that is a widespread native in much of Europe, across northern Asia to Siberia.
The toothed, cordate-triangular leaves are mid-green.
The fragrant, very pale lilac flowers are borne late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil. Propagation is from ssed sown during spring.

* historical archive photo