Monday, January 5, 2015

Purple Loosetrife

Lythrum

Lythrum alatum
In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was moderately abundant throughout the region as well as the Lake Erie islands and the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit during that time. It is found in marshland in the wild.

Lythrum salicaria ( Purple Loosetrife )
A perennial, reaching up to 5 feet, that is native to much of Europe through eastern Russia; south to northern Africa to Afghanistan to India, most of China, Korea and Japan. It is invasive in the Midwest and northeastern U.S. and should not be planted in those regions. It is naturalized as far north as Edmonton, Alberta as well as Sioux Lookout and Cochrane in Ontario. It is usually found in marshes, lakeshores and moist meadows in the wild.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 4.5 x 1 inches in size, are downy green.
The purplish-pink flowers, up to 0.8 inches wide, are borne on upright racemes, up to 16 inches long, during mid-summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on moist to wet soil. Deadhead after blooming to prevent invasive seeding. Propagation is from division during early spring.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC

* photos taken on Aug 1 2013 @ Stratford, Ontario


'Blush'
Pale blush-pink flowers; otherwise identical to species.

'Robert'
Bright pink flowers, otherwise identical to species.

Lythrum virgatum
A clumping perennial, reaching up to 3.3 feet, that is native to temperate Eurasia from southeast Europe to southeast Siberia; south to Tibet.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 x 0.6 inches in size, are mid-green.
The purplish-pink flowers are borne on upright racemes all summer long.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on moist to wet soil. Deadhead after blooming to prevent invasive seeding. Propagation is from division during early spring.

* photo taken on Aug 12 2015 in Columbia, MD

* historical archive photo

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