Monday, January 5, 2015

Clover

Trifolium

Trifolium arvense ( Rabbitfoot Clover )
Annual. In Ontario, it is found as far north as Kenora, Thunder Bay and Sault Ste Marie.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Trifolium incarnatum ( Crimson Clover )
An annual, reaching up to 3 feet in height, that is native to most of southern Canada and the U.S.
The trifoliae leaves are composed of 3 finely-toothed, obovate leaflets, up to 1 inch in length.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Trifolium pannonicum ( Hungarian Clover )
A perennial, reaching up to 3 x 3 feet.
The trifoliate leaves are composed of 3 narrow, mid-green leaflets.
The creamy-yellow flowers are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun on moist, fertile, well drained soil.

Trifolium pratense ( Red Clover )
A perennial, reaching up to 32 ( rarely over 20 ) inches in height, that is found over most of North America ( from Aleutian Islands to Fairbanks, Alaska to southwest Yukon to northeast Alberta to Gillam, Manitoba to Kenora, Ontario to Lake Nipigon, Ontario to Kapuskasing, Ontario to Labrador & Newfoundland and south. Originally brought from Europe, it is used as a hay or pasture crop for grazing livestock and as a cover crop for enriching the soil with nitrogen. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was already abundant and widespread by 1900. It was also abundant on the Ohio shore during presettlement and still is.
The trifoliate leaves are composed of 3 finely-toothed, oval or oblong leaflets up to 2 inches in length. They are usually mid-green with a lighter green chevron.
The pinkish-red flowers are borne on rounded clusters up to 1 inch across.
They are borne late spring into early autumn. This clover is great for honeybees.

* photo taken on Sep 9 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Trifolium reflexum ( Buffalo Clover )
Annual or biennial that is native to eastern North America ( from southeast Nebraska to central Iowa to northern Illinois to northwest Ohio to far southern Ontario to southeast Pennsylvania; south to central Oklahoma to eastern Texas to central Florida ). It is extinct in the wild in Ontario, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware; endangered in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia and North Carolina. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was locally common on the Detroit River islands as well as the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s.
Hardy zones 5 to 9.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Trifolium repens ( White Clover )
A trailing, groundcover ( rooting at nodes ) perennial, native to most of North America. It is an important hay and pasture plant. It is also valuable to honeybees. In Ontario, it is found as far north as Thunder Bay, Lake Nipigon and Moosonee; it is also widespread in southern Manitoba. In the west; it is widespread in central Alaska and also found as far north as central Yukon. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was widespread and uncommon during the 1800s, becoming abundant after land clearing for agriculture. It was abundant on the Ohio shore both during presettlement and currently.
The trifoliate leaves are composed of 3 finely-toothed, obovate leaflets, up to 0.7 inches in length.
The white ( rarely pink ) flowers, up to 0.3 inches in length, are borne late spring to mid-autumn

* photo taken on Seo 9 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 8 2015 in Towson, MD

* photo taken on June 3 2017 in Columbia, MD


Trifolium rubens
A perennial, reaching up to 1 x 1.7 feet.
The trifoliate leaves are composed of 3 toothed leaflets. The foliage is mid-green.
The fragant, pink flowers are borne spring into fall.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun on just about any moist, fertile, well drained soil.

Trifolium wormskioldii ( Cow's Clover )
Native to western North America ( from Queen Charlotte Islands to Kitimat, British Columbia to Castlegar, B.C.; south to northern California to northeast Nevade ).

* photo taken by William & Wilma Follette @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


No comments:

Post a Comment