Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Bellwort

Uvularia

Typically rhizomatous spreading plants with graceful arching stems bearing terminal panicles of greenish-white to creamy-white flowers along their length. The Bellworts are closely related to the Solomon's Seals and are very beautiful plants that have a place in any shaded garden.
They are very easy to grow on deep, fertile moist soil in light shade.
Mulching is recommended during spring to retain moisture for the summer months.
They are rarely bothered by pests or disease.
Propagation is from seed planted during late summer, or division during early spring or autumn.

* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


Uvularia grandiflora ( Large-Flowered Bellwort )
A fast growing, rhizome spreading, very long-lived, clumping perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 2+ ( rarely over 2.5 ) feet, that is native to moist or dry, upland, deciduous woodlands in central and eastern North America ( from central North Dakota to southern Manitoba to Thunder Bay, Ontario to Cabot Head, Ontario to Haliburton, Ontario to southeast Quebec to New Hampshire; south to eastern Oklahoma to Louisiana to far northern Georgia to central Maryland). It is endangered in North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, Oklahoma, Maryland, Connecticut and New Hampshire. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant at Point Pelee, the Lake Erie Islands and the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit, Michigan during that time. In 10 years time, the typical spread of a clump is about 2 feet. The young shoots can be eaten like asparagus however this ruins the future health and vigor of the plant.
The arching, slender stems bear attractive, drooping, elliptical leaves that are up to 5 x 2.6 inches in size. The foliage is bright green above, glaucous-blue beneath. The foliage remains into early autumn with adequate moisture.
The hanging, deep yellow, bell-shaped flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne mid to late spring. They are followed by red berries.
The rounded stems are bright green.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. Easy to grow. A little fertilizer during early spring makes them much more vigorous.
Clumps can be divided every 4 years during autumn and replanted with bone meal dusted in the hole.

* photos taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on June 9 2017 in Columbia, MD


Uvularia perfoliata ( Perfoliate Bellwort )
A moderate growing, rhizomatous, clumping perennial, reaching a maximum size of 2 x 1.5+ feet, that is native to rich, acidic, deciduous woodlands of eastern North America ( from eastern Oklahoma to southern Indiana to northeast Ohio to Niagara Falls, Ontario to southeast Quebec & Vermont; south to northern Louisiana to northern Florida ). It is also native to southwestern Ontario but has declined considerably and is now critically endangered in Canada. It is endangered in Indiana, Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, Florida, Vermont and New Hampshire. The young shoots can be eaten like asparagus however this ruins the future health and vigor of the plant.
The arching, slender stems bear elliptical leaves, up to 5 x 2.3 inches in size. The foliage is mid-green above and remains into early autumn with adequate moisture. . The unusual leaves are pierced by the stem.
The hanging, pale-yellow, bell-shaped flowers, up to 1.5 inches in length, are borne mid to late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, well drained soil. Easy to grow. A little fertilizer during early spring makes them much more vigorous.

* photos taken on May 6 2015 @ Cypressmeade Park, Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


Uvularia sessilifolia ( Sessile Bellwort )
A fast growing, widely rhizome spreading, clumping perennial, reaching a maximum size of 1.5 x 2+ feet, that is native to rich deciduous woodlands and bottomlands in eastern North America ( from Manitoba to Kenora, Ontario to Thunder Bay, Ontario to Saginaw, Michigan to southeast Quebec to Nova Scotia; south to eastern Texas to far northwest Florida to central South Carolina ). It is endangered in South Dakota, Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana. It is extinct in Nebraska. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario regions; it occurred locally at Detroit, Michigan during the 1800s. It also occurred sporadically on the Ohio shore during that time. In 10 years time, the typical spread of a clump is about 2 feet.
The arching, slender stems bear stem-clasping, elliptical leaves are up to 3.2 x 1.6 inches in size. The foliage is yellowish-green above and remains into early autumn with adequate moisture.
The hanging, light greenish-yellow, narrow bell-shaped flowers, up to 1 inches in length, are borne mid to late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. Easy to grow. A little fertilizer during early spring makes them much more vigorous.

* photos taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

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