Friday, August 8, 2014

Fawn Lilies

Erythronium
A genus of perennial bulbs that thrive in the shade of deciduous trees on deep, fertile, moist, well drained soil ( however they only need abundant moisture while actively growing.
They can be propagated from bulbs, offsets as well as seed which is much slower.
Over time plants may spread to form large colonies. The bulbs of most species are planted 2 to 3 inches deep and 0.5 feet apart. Some of the largers ones are planted 5 or more inches deep. The bulbs are planted during autumn. If the bulbs dry out during division or planting, they will not survive. It takes seedlings at least 3 years to bloom, however the wait is well worth it.

* photo taken by J.E. Broaddus @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken @ Middle Patuxent, Clarksville, MD on Apr 24 2015


Erythronium albidum ( White Fawn Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 8 inches, that is native to rich woods in eastern North America ( from eastern South Dakota to northwest Minnesota to central Michigan to Grand Bend, Ontario to central New York State; south to central Texas to Georgia ). In the Windsor/Essex County region; it was noted as being locally common between Windsor and Amherstburg as well as the Lake Erie Islands and the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It occurred sporadically at Detroit, Michigan during that time.
The narrowly-ovate to elliptical leaves are up to 9 inches in length. The foliage is mid-green with purplish mottling.
The white flowers are borne during early spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, acidic, humus-rich, well drained soil. It spreads naturally from stolons. The corms should be planted 2 to 3 inches deep.

* photos taken on March 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photo taken on Apr 22 2015 in Ellicott City, MD


Erythronium americanum ( Yellow Trout Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 1 foot in height, that is native to rich woods and bottomlands in eastern North America ( from northeast Minnesota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Batchewana, Ontario to Killarney, Ontario to Haliburton, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to Louisiana to South Carolina ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario regions; it was considered widespread and abundant throughout the region as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit, Michigan during that time.
The ovate or elliptical leaves are up to 9 x 2 inches in size. The foliage is bright green with deep purple mottling.
The yellow, nodding flowers, up to 2 inches, are borne early to mid spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial sun on moist, fertile, well drained soil. It is tolerant of temporary flooding.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Apr 21 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 23 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 23 2015 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken @ Middle Patuxent, Clarksville, MD on Apr 24 2015

* photo taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Erythronium californicum ( California Fawn Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 14 x 6 inches in size, that is native to northern California.
The elliptical leaves, up to 7 inches in length, are glossy mid-green with deep purplish-brown markings.
The white flowers are borne up to 3 per stem.
Hardy zones 5 ot 8 in partial shade on humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil.

Erythronium caucasicum
A perennial, reaching up to 6 inches in height, that is native to the western Caucasus and northern Iran. It is great for the woodland rock garden.
The ovate leaves, up to 2.4 x 1.3 inches in size, are blue-green and spotted.
The solitary, white flowers are borne early to mid-spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( 4 on protected sites ) in partial to full shade on just about any well drained soil. Transplant during late summer.

Erythronium citrinum ( Pale Fawn Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 14 inches in height, that is native to Oregon and California. The narrowly-ovate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are mottled. The creamy-white ( throated pale yellow ) flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, appear during mid-spring.
Hardy zones 6 to 8.

Erythronium dens-canis ( European Dogtooth Violet )
A perennial, reaching up to 14 x 4 ( rarely over 8 ) inches in size, that is native to southern and southeast Europe.
The elliptical leaves are mid-green or blue-green with bronze mottling.
The flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are pink ( sometimes white or purple ).
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade or deciduous shade on humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil.

* historic archive photo


Erythronium grandiflorum ( Yellow Avalanche Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 2 feet in height, that is native to the Rocky Mountains in western North America ( from Vancouver Island to Prince George, British Columbia to Calgary, Alberta to Medicine Hat, Alberta to south-central Montana; south to northern California to northern New Mexico ).
The elliptical leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are glossy mid-green with no markings.
The flowers are intense bright yellow to golden-yellow ( with red anthers ). The flowers are borne on clusters.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade on humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil.

* historical archive photos


Erythronium helenae ( Pacific Fawn Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 14 x 6 inches in size, that is native to northwestern California. It is related to E. californicum.
The elliptical leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are bright green and mottled.
The creamy-white ( centered yellow ) flowers are borne during mid-spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial shade on humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos


Erythronium japonicum ( Japanese Fawn Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 10 ( rarely over 6 ) inches in height, that is native to Sakhaklin & Kuril Islands, Korea and much of Japan. It is very closely related and similar to Erythronium dens-canis. It is found in mountain meadows in the wild.
The leaves are up to 9 x 2.5 ( rarely over 5 x 2 ) inches in size. The elliptical leaves are mid-green or blue-green with bronze mottling.
The bright purple ( rarely white ) flowers, up to 2 inches wide, appear during mid-spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

Erythronium montanum ( White Glacier Lily )
Also called White Avalanche Lily. It is a bulbous perennial that is native to western North America ( from southwest British Columbia to northern Oregon ). It is endangered in the wild in British Columbia.
The flowers are pure white.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* historical archive photo


Erythronium oregonum ( Giant Fawn Lily )
A bulbous perennial, reaching up to 16 inches, that is native to the Pacific Northwest from southwest British Columbia to southwest Oregon.
The mottled, ovate leaves are up to 10 inches in length.
The pure white flowers are borne during early spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial to full shade.

Erythronium 'Pagoda'
The hybrid between E. revolutum & E. tuilumnense, forming a vigorous, tuberous perennial, reaching up to 14 inches in height.
The broad-elliptical foliage is luxuriant mid-green with bronze mottling.
The intense bright yellow are borne up to 10 per stem.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in deciduous shade on a moist, humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil. Clumps can be divided after flowering is complete.

Erythronium revolutum ( Coast Fawn Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 1.3 foot, and is native to the Pacific Northwest from northern Vancouver Island to Lilloet, British Columbia; south to northern California.
The ovate leaves, up to 10 inches in length, are mottled.
The bright pink ( sometimes white or lavender ) nodding flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, are borne during early spring.
hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade.

Erythronium sibericum ( Siberian Fawn Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 1 foot that is native to the Altay and western Sayan in Siberia; south to eastern Kazakstan. It eventually spreads to form large patches.
The elliptical leaves, up to 8 x 3 inches, have reddish spots.
The pale lilac ( with yellow anthers ) flowers are borne during mid-spring. All white flowering forms exist.
Hardy zones 3 to 6 on well drained soil.

* photo of unknown internet source


Erythronium tuolumnense ( Tuolumne Fawn Lily )
A vigorous perennial, reaching up to 14 inches in height, that is native to lower elevations of the Sierra Nevada mountains in California.
The elliptical leaves, up to 14 inches in length, are solidly glossy bright green.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 1.3 inches wide, are borne during spring. Up to 7 flowers may be borne per stem.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil. Propagation is from division every 3 to 4 years.

'Pagoda'
A perennial, reaching up to 1 foot, that is native to lower elevations of the Sierra Nevada mountains in California.
The pale yellow flowers are borne during spring.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial to full shade. Propagation is from division every 3 to 4 years.

Erythronium umbilicatum ( Dimpled Trout Lily )
A bulbous perennial, reaching up to 8 inches in height, that is native to rich wooded slopes and floodplains in the southeastern U.S.( from western Kentucky to northwest West Virginia to Maryland; south to central Alabama to northwest Florida to central South Carolina ). It looks stunning in bloom as a solid groundcover.
The bright blue-gren leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are speckled purplish-brown.
The yellow flowers are borne during spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full deciduous shade.

* photo of unknown internet source

No comments:

Post a Comment