Monday, October 18, 2010

Perennial Sunflowers

Helianthus - Perennial Sunflowers
Mostly hardy zones 6 to 10 in sun to partial shade. The flowers on many attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Most love hot summers and are very easy to grow.
All Sunflowers prefer fertile, preferrably alkaline, moist soil and respond very well with vigor to frequent fertilizer application preferrably organic. They are easily grown from seed. Perennial species can be divided during autumn or early spring.
While everyone knows the Annual Sunflower, famous for its giant flowers and edible seeds, comparatively few are familiar with its often spectacular perennial relatives.
Indeed the Annual Sunflower ( Helianthus annuus ) is often planted as an agricultural crop often over very large acreage in eastern Europe, Russia and central North America.
The seeds of all species of Helianthus are edible. Sunflower seeds are highly nutritious. They contain close to 40% fat ( much of it essential fatty acids ), as well as 20% carbs and protein. Sunflower seed also contains Vitamin A, many Bs, Vinamin E, many minerals and even Vitamin D which rarely occurs in plants and is often deficient in people living in climates with sparse sunshine. Sunflower oil can be used as both a skin lotion and massage oil. A single acre of Annual Sunflower can produce up to 100 gallons of Sunflower Oil.
Many birds also find Sunflowers to be very nutritious and Sunflower seed is often sold in large bags for birdfood. The Seeds of all other Helianthus can be used in the same way however the seeds of many other Helianthus are too small to be used commercially.
Perennial Sunflowers can be cut back during early summer for shorter later flowering plants. They are often cut back hard after flowering though sometimes left along until early winter since birds enjoy the seeds.
Propagation is from seed or division every 3 years during autumn or spring.

* photo of unknown internet source




Helianthus angustifolius ( Narrow-leaved Sunflower )
Also called Swamp Sunflower. A rapid spreading, clump-forming, very large perennial reaching up to 10 x 10 feet that is native to the southeastern U.S. ( from southeast Missouri to southern Ohio to Long Island; south to eastern Texas to central Florida ). It is critically endangered in New York State due to declines caused by phragmite invasion of its natural habitat. It is found in pinelands and bogs in the wild, they look great with Switch Grass in the natural landscape.
The bristly stems bear alternately-arranged, sessile, narrow lance-shaped leaves, up to 12 x 0.8 inches in size, with rolled down edges.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne late summer into early autumn. The seed heads that follow are loved by birds.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun on acidic, moist to wet but well drained soil. Drought / clay tolerant, salt & deer resistant. Cut back hard during mid-summer for denser habit.

* photos taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.






* photo taken on Oct 16 2016 in Beltsville, MD


'Gold Lace'
Reaches up to 8 x 8 ( rarely over 6 x 5 ) feet with finely textured deep green foliage and profuse golden-yellow flowers borne during early autumn, earlier than the species.

'Low Down'
A miniature form, reaching a maximum size of only 20 inches x 3 feet.
The flowers are borne over a long season lasting late summer until autumn frost.
It makes a great plant for edging, groundcover or containers.

* photos taken on Oct 6 2012 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken on Sep 23 2013 in Burtonsville, MD


'Matanzas Creek'
Reaches up to 8 x 6 feet in 5 years, eventually broader, with strong sturdy stems bearing very large spikes of very abundant, showy light yellow flowers. The flowers are borne over a long season during mid to late autumn and it may not be suitable where early fall frost may cut the bloom season short.

'Mellow Yellow'
Reaches up to 10 feet with abundant pastel-yellow flowers; otherwise identical.

Helianthus atrorubens ( Purpledisc Sunflower )
A very vigorous rhizome-spreading perennial, reaching up to 8 x 6 ( rarely over 6 ) feet, that is native to open woodlands in the southeastern U.S. ( from far southern Illinois to central Kentucky to northern Virginia; south to Louisiana to far northern Florida )
The toothed, oval leaves, up to 12 inches in length, are mid-green.
The deep golden orange-yellow ( with purplish-red center ) flowers, up to 4 ( rarely over 2 ) inches across, are borne during late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( likely 5 for central Kentucky seed source ) in full sun to partial shade. Propagation is from division or seed.

'Gullick's Variety'
Vigorous and wide rhizome-spreading, reaching up to 5.5 feet in height.
The abundant flowers, up to 4 inches wide, are bright yellow.

Helianthus debilis ( Beach Sunflower )
A trailing to semi-upright perennial, reaching a maximum size of 7 x 6 feet, that is native to sandy coastal plains in eastern North America ( from Texas to Florida and north to Maine ).
The either toothed or non-toothed leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are alternately-arranged and borne on long stalks.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 5 inches across, are borne early summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil. It is extremely salt tolerant and makes an excellent groundcover in coastal areas.

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Flora Sun'
text coming soon

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.


Helianthus decapetalus ( Thinleaf Sunflowers )
A vigorously rhizome- spreading, large perennial reaching up to 6.5 x 6.5 feet, that is native to streambanks and bottomlands in the central and eastern U.S. ( Nebraska to Minnesota to central Michigan to Grand Bend, Ontario to northern New York State to New Brunswick and Maine; south to Missouri to Kentucky to northern Georgia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was only known from the Ohio shore during the 1800s where it was abundant.
The coarsely-toothed, cordate-ovate leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are rough, mid-green.
The pale yellow ( with deeper yellow center ) flowers, up to 6 inches across, are borne during mid-summer into early autumn.
Hardy north to zone 3, in full sun to partial shade on moist soil. Powdery mildew may become a problem on plants under drought stress. Propagation is from division or seed.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Capenoch Star'
Full upright plant reaching up to 6 x 6.5 feet with creeping rhizomes that form a large patch.
The leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are deep green.
The large, single, light yellow flowers, up to 8 inches across, are borne mid summer into autumn.
Hardy north to zone 4

'Plenus'
Reaches up to 5 feet in height with large, bright yellow, double flowers from mid summer to early autumn.

Helianthus divaricatus ( Woodland Sunflower )
A perennial, reaching up to 7 x 4 feet, that is native to dry woodlands in eastern North America ( from Saskatchewan to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Grand Bend, Ontario to Ottawa, Ontario to southeast Quebec & Maine; south to Arkansas to South Carolina ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant in southern Essex County, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The stemless, oppositely-arranged, lance-shaped leaves, up to 8 x 3 inches, are bright green.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne mid-summer to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade on well drained soil.

* photos taken on Aug 3 2011 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC

* photos taken on Aug 23 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 13 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 12 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 20 2016 in Columbia, MD


'Chartreuse Butterflies'

* see external link
http://www.chicagolandgrows.org/perennials/butterflies.php

Helianthus giganteus ( Tall Sunflower )
A very large perennial reaching up to 15 x 6 ( rarely over 10 ) feet that is native to swamps and wet meadows in eastern North America ( from Alberta to Saskatchewan to International Falls to around the north shore of Lake Superior to Sauble Beach, Ontario & Nova Scotia; south to eastern South Dakota to southeast Iowa to central Mississippi to far northern Georgia to the Tidewater region of Virginia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant in southern Essex County, the Lake Erie islands and the Ohio shore, uncommon at Point Pelee during the 1800s. It was also abundant at that time in marshland along the Detroit River.
The alternately-arranged, lance-shaped leaves are up to 8 x 1.5 inches in size.
The branched flower stems bear golden-yellow flowers, up to 3 inches across, during early to mid autumn.
The seeds are useful in the same way as Annual Sunflower.
The roots are also edible.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on moist soil.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Sep 24 2016 in Annapolis, MD


'Sheila's Sunshine'
Reaches up to 10 x 6 feet, with pale yellow flowers during early autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 9.

Helianthus grosseserratus ( Sawtooth Sunflower )
A perennial, reaching up to 12 ( reports of as much as 17 ) feet in height, that is native to moist bottomlands in eastern North America ( from eastern North Dakota to Quebec and Maine; south to central Texas to North Carolina ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it likely occurred in the Canard River Valley and was considered abundant across the lake on the Ohio shore.
The toothed, lance-shaped leaves, up to 12 x 2.5 ( rarely over 8 ) inches in size, are rough, deep green.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 4 inches wide, are borne late summer into mid-autumn.
The stems are often purplish-red.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on moist, fertile, loamy soil.

* photo taken by Bill Summers @ USDA SCS. 1989. Midwest wetland flora

* photo of unknown internet source


Helianthus hirsutus ( Hairy Sunflower )
A dense colony-forming, upright perennial, up to 6 x 3 feet, that is native to dry open woods and oak savanna in eastern North America ( from nw Minnesota to Ontario to central New York State; south to central Texas to central Georgia to South Carolina...it is extremely rare and local in the Appalachians and east of there ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was only known from the Ohio shore where it was abundant during the 1800s. It also occurred sporadically at Detroit during the settlement era but no longer occurs there.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 6.5 x 2.3 inches in size, are rough and mid-green.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 3 inches wide, are borne late summer to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on very well drained soil.

* photos taken on June 30 2013 @ Grand Bend, Ontario


Helianthus laetiflorus var rigidus ( Showy Sunflower )
A rapid rhizomatous spreader reaching up to 8 feet with upright stems. It is native to open woodlands from southern Alberta to Saskatchewan to Kenora, Ontario to Oliphant, Ontario to Quebec; south to New Mexico to Georgia.
The rough, toothed, narrowly-ovate leaves, up to 12 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The abundant, bright yellow ( with dark centers ) daisies, up to 4 inches across, are borne mid July to late September.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 preferring moist, well drained soil soil but is very drought / clay tolerant. Over fertilizing may encourage top heavy plants that flop over.

'Lemon Queen'
A fast growing to invasive, sturdy, upright perennial to 8 x 6 feet with light yellow single flowers up to 3 inches across borne mid-summer well into autumn. A 1 gallon size plant may clump out to 4 feet in just one season.
The luxuriant deep green foliage is very rust resistant.
Hardy zones 3 to 9

* photos taken on Aug 20 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD




* photos taken on Sep 15 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Sep 26 2013 in Baltimore Co., MD


Helianthus maximilianii ( Maximilians Sunflower )
A very aggressive growing large perennial reaching up to 12 x 6 feet. It is a widespread native of North America ( from Vancouver Island to Mackenzie, British Columbia to just west of Banff National Park, Alberta to southern Saskatchewan to Kenora, Ontario to Thunder Bay, Ontario to Parry Sound, Ontario to Maine; south into the U.S ) found anywhere from prairies to swamps. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it is only known from the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It also occurred sporadically at Detroit during that time. It grows from a thick edible rhizome. Great for use against a fence and even as a perennial hedge, it is among the most spectacular of all fall blooming perennials.
The thick, smooth-edged or shallow-toothed, lance-shaped leaves are up to 12 inches in length, are blue-green above, white beneath. The rough textured foliage is borne from hairy stems. The leaves are folded inwards unlike other Helianthus.
The flowers, up to 6 inches in width, are bright golden-yellow, single daisies born September into November. The flowers attract butterflies. Taller later blooming seed source may not have time to bloom in the north before autumn frosts arrive.
The seeds are useful in the same way as Annual Sunflower, they are often left on the plants to attract birds. It has potential as a perennial seed crop.
The roots are also edible in the same way as Helianthus tuberosus and the natives used it as a food source who roasted and boiled it.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 ( use shorter northern seed source for northern regions ) in full sun on well drained soil. Very heat, drought and clay tolerant. Deer and rabbit resistant.
Propagation is easy from seed and self sowing often occurs. Division is also easily done during autumn immediately after cutting back after the stalks die back. The stalks are cut back to the ground during the winter to make room for new growth in the spring.

* photos taken on Sep 24 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photo of unknown internet source


'Aztec'
Similar to species however was bred by USDA to be especially well adapted to the southern Great Plains.

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.

'Dakota Sunshine'
Similar but exceptionally cold hardy, still north to zone 3 but thriving even where the growing seasons are very short such as in the high plains.
It reaches up to 6 x 5 feet, and has the typical attractive luxuriant green foliage and showy golden-yellow daisies.

'Lemon Yellow'
Similar but reaches up to 6 x 3 feet, bearing lemon-yellow flowers rather than the typical deeper golden-yellow.

'Prairie Gold'
Bred by the USDA in Kansas, it is very vigorous and especially well adapted to the dry central plains from Iowa to northern Texas.

* Photos courtesy of USDA NRCS.


'Santa Fe'
A clone, reaching up to 8 x 4 feet, that is offered by High Country Gardens.
The attractive foliage is deep green and the stunning, large, golden-yellow flowers are borne during mid autumn.

Helianthus microcephalus
A perennial, reaching up to 13 ( rarely over 6 ) x 4 feet, that is native to moist woodlands in the eastern U.S. ( from southeast Missouri to sw Michigan to northwest Pennsylvania; south to Louisiana to central Alabama to central South Carolina...it is very rare and localized on the Coastal Plain ). It was abundant on the Ohio shore during the 1800s but has declined considerably since. It is similar in appearance to Helianthus divaricatus.
The pointed, ovate leaves are up to 6 x 2.3 inches in size.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne over a long season during mid-summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun on moist soil. Clay tolerant.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Helianthus mollis ( Downy Sunflower )
Also called Ashe Sunflower. A long-lived, rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6 x 7.2 ( rarely over 4.5 ) feet, that is native to dry meadows and open woods in eastern North America ( from southeast Nebraska to northern Wisconsin to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Detroit, Michigan to northeast Ohio to Massachusetts; south to central Oklahoma to eastern Texas to northern Georgia ). It is extinct in the wild in West Virginia; endangered in Nebraska, Michigan and Ohio. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was only known from the Ohio shore where locally abundant on the Oxford and Huron Prairies during the 1800s.
The ovate leaves are up to 6 x 3 inches in size. The foliage appears gray-green as it is covered in downy white hairs.
The abundant, large, deep yellow flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne during late summer into mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun. Tolerant of poor soils and severe drought. Easy to grow.

* photos taken on Aug 3 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photos taken on Sep 16 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* historic archive photo


Helianthus x multiflorus
Perennials, reaching a maximum size of 7 x 3 feet. They are hybrids between the annual sunflower Helianthus annuus and the perennial Helianthus decapetalus.
The ovate leaves are up to 10 x 6 inches in size. The foliage is coarsely hairy and deep green.
The flowers, up to 5 inches across, are borne late summer until autumn frosts.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun on consistently moist, well drained soil.
Propagation is from vegetative stem cuttings with intermittent mist and bottom heat.

'Sunshine Daydream'
Originated as a branch sport of 'Capenoch Star', reaching up to 6 x 4 feet, with very dense foliage that is lush even in extreme summer heat.
The very abundant, fully double, golden-yellow, Dahlia-like blooms are borne continuously from early to late summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 8. The foliage is mildew resistant.

Heliantus nuttallii ( Nuttall's Sunflower )
Similar to Helianthus tuberosus but much smaller ( up to 7 feet, very rarely as much as 13 feet ) and less vigorous. It is native to moist meadows in the Rocky Mountains ( from Mackenzie, British Columbia to Banff National Park, Alberta to Vermilion, Alberta to southern Saskatchewan to Dauphin, Manitoba; south to central Oregon to Nevada to New Mexico to southwest Missouri ). It is also found locally at Unaka Lake, Ontario west of Lake Superior. It is endangered in Oregon, Alberta, Ontario and Iowa.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 inches long, are glossy mid-green.
The deep yellow flowers, up to 4 inches across, have an orange ring around the center which is also deep yellow. They are borne during early fall.
Hardy zones 3 tl 8 in full sun.

* photo taken by Joe F. Duft @ USDA NRCS. 1992. Western wetland flora

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Helianthus occidentalis ( Few-Leaf Sunflower )
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 6.5 x 3 feet, that is native to dry open woods in midwestern North America ( from western Iowa to eastern Minnesota to northern Michigan to western Pennsylvania; south to eastern Texas to Tennessee to western North Carolina ). It was considered to occur only sporadically on the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The finely-toothed, ovate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are mid-green.
The abundant, deep yellow flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, are borne late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun.

Helianthus salicifolius ( Willow-leafed Sunflower )
A rhizomatous, upright, large perennial, reaching up to 10 x 7 feet, that is native to the central U.S. ( from Colorado to Nebraska and western Missouri; south to northern Texas & Oklahoma ). It is endangered in Texas. It can be invasive as the long rhizomes form large clumps. This plant is an excellent companion plant for larger Asters and Echinacea.
The drooping, willow-like leaves, up to 12 x 0.2 inches in size, are glossy deep green turning bright yellow late in autumn.
Masses of 3 inch, bright yellow daisies with dark centers are borne late summer to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 9, prefers moist fertile soil but is tolerant of dry soil and likes lime. Cutting plants back in mid June will make them shorter but more strong and compact.

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on Oct 22 2014 in Edgewater, MD

* historic archive photos


'Bitter Chocolate'
Shorter, rarely exceeding 6 feet in height, bearing large flowers, up to 3 inches across, earlier in the season.

'First Light'
A dwarf form only reaching up to 4 x 4 feet with very abundant, golden-yellow flowers with brown eyes borne in mid autumn. Very sturdy in habit, it does not need staking.
Hardy zones 5 to 9. It is tolerant of wet clay.

* photo taken on Oct 15 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on October 14 2010 in Crownsville, MD

* photo taken on Sep 26 2013 in Baltimore Co., MD

* photo taken on June 21 2014 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, Washington, DC

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on Oct 1 2014 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* photos taken on Oct 5 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 22 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 16 2016 in Beltsville, MD


Helianthus simulans ( Muck Sunflower )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 12 x 10 ( rarely over 10 ) feet, that is native to wet sites in the southeastern U.S. ( Arkansas to Tennessee; south to Louisiana to Florida ).
Very attractive even when not in bloom, the plants resemble some species of Bamboo in appearance.
The narrow, lance-shaped leaves, up to 9 x 1.3 inches, are luxuriant mid-green.
The foliage is similar to that of H. angustifolia.
The abundant, golden-yellow ( with purple-red center ) flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne mid autumn until the first hard freeze, even it that is in late November.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun on moist to wet soil. Cut back by 1/3 during June to encourage bushiness.

* photos taken on Aug 20 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD



Helianthus strumosus ( Paleleaf Woodland Sunflower )
A very fast spreading ( sometimes invasive ), woody-based, perennial, reaching a maximum size of 7 x 3 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, that is native to dry open woodlands in eastern North America ( from Minnesota to Upsala, Ontario to Thunder Bay, Ontario to Haliburton, Ontario to New Brunswick; south to Texas to Florida ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was noted as uncommon at Point Pelee as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The oppositely-arranged, thick, lance-shaped leaves, up to 10 x 3 inches in size, are mid-green.
The large, deep yellow flowers, up to 4 inches wide, are borne for up to a month or more during mid-summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial shade. Easy to grow.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Helianthus tuberosus ( Jerusalem Artichoke )
A very fast growing, large perennial, reaching up to 12 x 5 + feet, that is native to the Great Plains of North America ( from south-central British Columbia to Montana to Saskatchewan to Rainy River, Ontario to Lion's Head, Ontario to Haliburton, Ontario; south to Colorado to western Oklahoma to northern Georgia...also naturalized further east ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was uncommon in southern Essex County, the Lake Erie islands and the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It is usually found on rich floodplains and open woodlands in the wild.
The toothed, ovate leaves, up to 12 x 6.5 ( rarely over 10 ) inches in size, are mid-green. The leaves are alternately-arranged on the middle and upper stem.
The abundant flowers, up to 4 inches across, are bright yellow and very attractive. They are borne late summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on fertile, moist soil. The Jerusalem Artichoke prefers climates with cool to cold winters. Heat and drought tolerant, they are not often bothered by insect pests or disease. Overhead irrigation may sometimes encourage powdery mildew on the foliage. These plants rarely produce good seed but are easy to reproduce from tubers or even tuber fragments. You can often find these tubers in produce markets.
Jerusalem Artichoke is harvested during mid to late autumn after the foliage dies down by digging the tubers. They're flavor is enhanced after the first few hard frosts. Digging the tubers is rarely harmful to the Jerusalem Artichoke since some always get left behind and grow to form new plants the following spring. In fact ones you plant Jerusalem Artichoke in the garden, it is usually very difficult to get rid of. The tubers contain lots of minerals but only 75 calories per pound.
The tubers can be stored in moist sand but generally don't last long once they are dug. Therefore it is important to only dig what you can use. In fact you can repeatedly dig them all winter long as long as the soil isn't frozen solid.
The tubers contain insulin and taste much better after baking which converts the insulin into sugar, making them sweeter. They can be stir fried and even eaten fresh in salads. The tubers can even be grounded into flour for diet pasta, baking or soup thickening, after they have been dried.
The tubers of the Jerusalem Artichoke can be boiled as well but overcooking will make them mushy.
To prepare the tubers, clean out the crevices but you do not need to peel them. Cutting off and replanting the knobby parts is recommended since you never want a good plant to go to waste.
Up to 20 tons of tubers may be produced per acre and the plant can be used to manufacture fuel alcohol.
The tubers make excellent pig feed, and pigs are the best way to eliminate this plant when the crop is no longer needs.

* photo taken on Aug 4 2012 in Bayfield, Ontario


* photos taken on Sep 3 2013 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Sep 15 2013 in Howard Co., MD
* photo taken by Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken on Sep 21 2016 in Columbia, MD

* excellent videos found on youtube


Helianthus verticillatus ( Whorled Sunflower )
A rhizomatous, very tall, upright perennial reaching up to 12 feet that is native to Tennessee, northeast Alabama and Georgia where it is nearly extinct. It is among the rarest plants of North America.
The linear leaves, up to 7 x 1.2 inches in size, are glossy mid-green. They are often whorled around the stem.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 3 inches wide, are borne early to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun on just about any well drained soil. While it is native to moist prairies, it is tolerant of drought.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC


Non-Perennial Species

Helianthus annua ( Annual Sunflower )
A tall growing annual, reaching up to 8 feet or more, that is native to central North America ( from far southern Alberta to far southern Manitoba to Minnesota; south to the Mexican border. It has also naturalized well beyond its natural range to the east.
The leaves are up to 12 inches in length.

* photos taken on Sep 20 2014 in Harford Co., MD


'Russian Giant'
Reaches up to 12 feet in height, with huge golden-yellow flowers up to 12 inches wide.

3 comments:

  1. Its so beautiful Blog.The landscaper Arizona will draw up a design to enhance the look and practicality of your outdoor space. This includes flora choice and layout, as well as design elements such as paving, pathways, water features, walls and other innovations.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I grew a lovely perennial sunflower from seed ten years ago. Last year it never bloomed and seemed to revert to a "grassier" type of plant. It was a big patch - i wonder what happened?

    Loretta

    ReplyDelete