Monday, November 29, 2010

Lithodora

Lithodora

Lithodora diffusa
An evergreen subshrub forming an attractive, low creeping mat reaching up to 1 x 3 feet or rarely up to 6 feet in width. It is native to sand dunes, heather and open pine woods in southwestern Europe ( western France; south to Portugal & Spain ).
The narrow-elliptical leaves, up to 1.5 inches in length, are deep gray-green.
The brilliant sky blue flowers, up to 0.8 inches long, are borne late spring through late summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on very well drained, humus-rich, acidic soil. Soil testing is important because this plant does not grow well on soils high in lime and PH. It especially thrives on the West Coast however will also grow in the east. In zones 5 and 6 it should be mulched since a severe winter or severe frost heaving can kill it.


* photos taken on May 8 2010 in Columbia, MD




* photo taken on Apr 28 2017 in Ellicott City, MD


'Grace Ward'
Intense blue flowers.

* photo taken on Apr 1 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 6 2015 in Ellicott City, MD


'Heavenly Blue'
Deep blue flowers.

Lithodora oleifolium
A moderate growing, creeping subshrub reaching a maximum size of 1 x 3.3 feet, that is native to the Pyrenees Mountains in Europe. It is rhizomatous.
The foliage is hairy and gray-blue.
The flowers are pink in bud opening to pale blue. They are borne all summer long.
Hardy north to zone 6. Lime tolerant.

RELATED PLANTS

Buglossoides purpurocaerulea ( Purple gromwell )
A fast spreading, rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 2 feet in height, that makes a great, weed-proof groundcover. It may be invasive on some sites.
The attractive, bristly hairy, narrow lance-shaped leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are luxuriant deep green.
The flowers, up to 0.8 inches wide, are purple in bud, opening to rich blue. They are borne during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun or partial shade on limey, well drained soil. It is tolerant of dry, gravelly sites.

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