Friday, January 21, 2011

Dryopteris Ferns

Dryopteris
A genus of very diverse and beautiful Ferns that make excellent additions to the shaded landscape. They are very low maintenance, left alone by insects, disease and even deer.


* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ McCrillis Gardens, Bethesda, MD

* photos taken on Oct 30 2011 in Columbia, MD



* photo taken on July 15 2015 in Columbia, MD


Dryopteris aemula ( Hay-scented Wood Fern )
An erect Fern, forming a clump up to 2 x 2 feet, that is a widespread native of Europe, east to the Caucasus.
The hay-scented, finely-divided, evergreen fronds, up to 30 x 6 inches, are bright green.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on fertile, moist, acidic soil.

Dryopteris affinis ( Scaly Male Fern )
A Fern, forming a vigorous, rhizomatous, deciduous clump up to 5 x 5 feet, that is native to woodlands in Europe from the British Isles to the Caspian Sea as well as northern Africa.
The bipinnate, lance-shaped fronds are up to 40 x 8 inches in size. The foliage is bright green at first, later turning to deep green.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade. Tolerant of sun in cooler climates on moist soil.

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'The King' ( Crested Male Fern )
A spectacular, graceful, fast growing, semi-evergreen monster of a Fern that reaches a maximum size of 5 x 5 feet.
The arched fronds, up to 6 inches across, have lightly crested leaflets.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


Dryopteris amurensis ( Amur Wood Fern )
A small evergreen Fern, reaching up to 2 feet, that is native to conifer forests of eastern Siberia, northeast China, Korea and Japan.
The fronts are up to 20 x 8 inches.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

Dryopteris arguta ( Coastal Wood Fern )
A medium sized, colony-forming evergreen Fern reaching a maximum size of 3 x 4 feet, that is native from Vancouver Island to Chilliwack, British Columbia; south to Baja California with a separate range in central Arizona. It is also locally native in mountainous northeast Washington State. It is endangered in Canada.
The double pinnate, triangular fronds are up to 40 x 12 inches in size. The foliage is glossy deep green.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 ( hardiest clones zone 7 ) this Fern does not grow in the hot humid eastern U.S. Drought tolerant once fully established.

Dryopteris x australis ( Dixie Wood Fern )
A rare sterile hybrid that is a vigorous, large Fern, up to 5 x 6 feet, that is sometimes found in the southeastern U.S. It is a hybrid between Dryopteris celsa & D. ludoviciana.
The spectacular, coarse, broad, erect fronds, up to 5 feet in length, are glossy deep green. The foliage is semi-evergreen, on from zone 7 and south is evergreen. This incredibly lush beautiful Fern looks like it belongs in a tropical rainforest rather than the eastern U.S. / Canada.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in partial to full shade. This Fern is sterile and can only be reproduced by division or tissue culture. Prefers moist soil but it is somewhat drought tolerant once fully established.

* photo taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on June 7 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photos taken on July 21 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 26 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on on Aug 23 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 21 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 15 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 23 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 9 2016 in Columbia, MD


Dryopteris bissetiana ( Beaded Wood Fern )
A small evergreen Fern, forming a clump up to 2 x 2 feet, that is native to China, Korea and Japan.
The textured, leathery, triangular fronds, up to 2 x 1 feet, are glossy deep green all year. The new fronds emerge during early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in partial to full shade.

Dryopteris campyloptera ( Mountain Wood Fern )
A medium size, deciduous Fern, that is native to cool, moist woods in eastern North America ( from Ottawa, Ontario to eastern Labrador and Newfoundland; south to northern Pennsylvania to New Jersey ( also scattered in Michigan and from Maryland to Georgia in mountains ).
The double-pinnate, broad triangular fronds are up to 36 x 12 inches.
Hardy zones 3 to 7.

Dryopteris carthusiana ( Toothed Wood Fern )
Also called Dryopteris spinulosa. A medium-sized, semi-evergreen Fern, reaching up to 3.5 x 3 feet, that is native to swampy woods in northern North America ( from Anchorage, Alaska to central Northwest Territories to The Pas, Manitoba to Winisk, Ontario to Labrador and Newfoundland; south to Washington State to western Montana to central Sask. to Missouri to central North Carolina ) and boreal forests of Eurasia. It was considered abundant through the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region before 1900.
The very frilled, double-pinnate fronds, up to 42 x 12 inches, are deep green, turning to yellow in autumn.
Hardy zones 1 to 7 in partial to full shade on moist to wet soil that is rich in humus. It not only tolerates but absolutely loved wet sites. Very easy to grow and great for naturalizing in woodland gardens.

* photos taken on July 17 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photos taken on Sep 23 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD


Dryopteris caucasica ( Caucasian Wood Fern )
A medium sized, deciduous Fern, reaching up to 3 feet in height, that is native to mountain forests between the Black and Caspian Seas as well as Turkey and northwest Iran.
The fronds, up to 40 x 8 inches, are bright green.
Hardy zones 5 to 8

Dryopteris celsa ( Log Fern )
Considered to be a hybrid between Dryopteris goldiana & D. ludoviciana. A very erect, fast growing, semi-evergreen Fern, reaching up to 52 inches x 4 feet, that is native to the southeast U.S. ( southern Missouri to eastern Pennsylvania to Long Island; south to eastern Texas to central Alabama to South Carolina...also scattered further north in northwest Indiana, Michigan and western New York State ). It spreads by rhizomes but is not invasive.
The large triangular fronds, up to 48 x 12 inches, are glossy bright green turning to deep green.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in partial to full shade on moist, fertile, acidic soil. Easy to grow and tolerant of swampy conditions. Log Fern is also very heat tolerant. It is often found growing on old rotted logs in the wild.

* photo taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ McCrillis Gardens, Bethesda, MD


* photos taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Dryopteris championii ( Champion's Wood Fern )
A very handsome, strong growing, evergreen Fern, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 4 feet, that is native to China, Korea and Japan.
This Fern has very attractive, broadly triangular fronds, up to 36 x 12 ( rarely over 20 ) inches, that even remain erect and deep glossy green all winter long. The fresh foliage is verdant glossy bright green upon emerging in spring before deepening in color. There are very few Ferns that look so beautiful after a fresh snowfall.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 and easy to grow in partial to full shade on typical moderately moist soil.

* photo taken on annual Horticultural Society of Maryland Garden Tour


* photos taken on Aug 18 2011 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on Oct 17 2011 in Columbia, MD







* photos taken on May 14 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


Dryopteris clintoniana ( Clinton's Shield Fern )
A vigorous, medium-sized, evergreen Fern reaching up to 4 x 4 feet that is native to swampy woods of eastern North America ( from eastern Wisconsin to Mackinaw Island, Michigan to Parry Sound, Ontario to Ottawa, Ontario to Nova Scotia, south to northern Indiana to Maryland & Delaware ).
The bipinnate leathery fronds, up to 48 x 8 inches,are divided into 10 to 15 pairs of lance-shaped pinnae, up to 5 inches in length, ach with deeply lobed and cut subleaflets. The erect stalks are slender and blackish.
Hardy zones 3 to 6 in partial to full shade on fertile moist soil. Flood tolerant.

Dryopteris crasshirhozima ( Thick Stemmed Wood Fern )
A stately, semi-evergreen Fern, reaching a maximum size of 4.5 x 3.5 feet, that is native to woodland slopes in eastern Russia, Manchuria, Korea and Japan. An excellent choice for a focal point in the landscape.
The erect arching fronds, up to 5 x 1 ( rarely over 3.3 x 1 ) feet in size, are glossy green above, brown hairy beneath. Up to 10 fronds are borne from a massive rhizome up to 4 inches across.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade. Drought tolerant and easy to grow.

* photo taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.






* photos taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken by Dr. Nick V. Kurzenko @ CalPhotos


Dryopteris cristata ( Crested Wood Fern )
A Fern, forming a clump up to 3 x 3 feet, that is native to cool swampy woods of northern Eurasia and northern North America ( from Kitsault, British Columbia to Prince George, B.C. to Edmonton, Alberta to Winnipeg, Manitoba to Lansdowne House, Ontario to Timmins, Ontario to Sept-Iles, Quebec to all of Newfoundland; south to Washington State to Montana to northern Illinois to southern Ohio to Virginia...further south in Appalachian Mtns. ). It was abundant throughout the region including Windsor and Essex County, Ontario before 1900. It also occurred sporadically on the Ohio shore during that time.
The leathery fronds, up to 24 x 7 inches, are not crested.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on fertile, moist soil.

Dryopteris cycadina ( Shaggy Wood Fern )
Also called Dryopteris atrata. A moderate growing, semi-evergreen to evergreen Fern reaching a maximum size of 4 x 3 feet, that is native to dense forests on mountain slopes in the Himalayas, China and Japan.
The striking, stiff, heavily-textured leathery fronds, up to 40 x 8 inches, are bright golden-green at first, turning to very deep green. The stems are densely covered in black scales.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in partial to full shade on moist to wet soil rich in humus. Very easy to grow. Mulch is recommended during winter.

* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ McCrillis Gardens, Bethesda, MD


Dryopteris dilitata ( Broad Buckler Fern )
A large, vigorous Fern forming a graceful broad clump, reaching a maximum size of 6 x 4 feet. The Broad Buckler Fern is a widespread native to acid woods of North America, Eurasia and South Africa. Looks great planted next to water.
The elegant, broad triangular deciduous to semi-evergreen fronds, reaching up to 72 x 15 ( rarely over 40 x 10 ) inches, are deep green. The bipinnate fronds divide into 10 to 15 pairs of lance-shaped pinnae, up to 5 inches in length, having deeply toothed and lobed leaflets.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 ( 2 likely 2 for northeast Mongolia seed source ) in partial to full shade on fertile, moist, slightly acidic soil that is rich in humus. Somewhat drought tolerant and will also grow very well on wet sites.

'Crispa Whiteside'
Crispy deep green fronds, up to 16 inches in length.

'Jimmy Dyce'
A very attractive, stiffly erect, deciduous Fern reaching up to 4 x 4 feet with a domes central crown.
The stiff upright, broadly triangular leaves are rich blue-green.

'Lepidota Cristata' ( Crested Broad Buckler Fern )
Reaches up to 3.5 x 4 feet with broad, dainty, deep blue-green fronds with very finely cut leaflets.

'Recurvata' ( Recurced Broad Buckler Fern )
A vigorous, graceful Fern reaching up to 5 x 4 feet, with broad triangular, recurving, deep green fronds with drooping leaflets giving it a graceful appearance.

Dryopteris erythrosora ( Autumn Fern )
A very beautiful, moderate growing, evergreen Fern, forming a clump up to 3.5 x 4.5 feet, that is native to forests of China, Korea, Japan and the Phillipines. It can be massed and used as a groundcover.
The broad triangular fronds, up to 48 x 14 ( rarely over 24 x 10 ) inches, are orangish-red during spring, maturing to glossy deep green by early summer. The stems are glossy reddish-brown. The bipinnate fronds are composed of 8 to 20 pairs of lance-shaped pinnae, up to 8 inches in length, with deeply cut and lobed leaflets.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, fertile soil that is rich in humus. Easy to grow. If placed on a shaded site, it becomes heat and drought tolerant.


* photo taken on Mar 7 2013 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD
* photos taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, Washington, DC

* photo taken on Nov 11 2014 in Columbia, MD


'Brilliant'
Similar but with new fronds even more intensely lustrous orange, turning to glossy green but retaining orange tints.

* photos taken on May 5 2010 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on annual Horticultural Society of Maryland Garden Tour

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on May 14 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 17 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 18 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on July 1 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Jun 14 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 23 2016 in Columbia, MD


'Purpurescens' ( Giant Autumn Fern )
Similar except with the new fronds being deep orange-red to bronze with a red-purple rachis. This very beautiful Fern continues to produce new fronds all season long. It is more vigorous than the species, with fronds typically over 3 feet in length.
Hardy zones 5a +.

'Radiance'

* photo taken on May 1 2014 in Baltimore Co., MD

* photo taken on July 15 2015 in Columbia, MD


var purpurescens ( Giant Autumn Fern )
Also called Dryopteris pururella. Similar to Dryopteris erythrosora but more upright and with larger, more upright fronds, up to 3.5 feet in length. The fronds are intense orangish-red at first, turning to glossy deep green. Hardy zone 5a +.

Dryopteris expansa ( Northern Wood Fern )
Among the most cold hardy of all landscape plants, this Fern forms a semi-evergreen clump up to 3 x 4 feet, and is native to cool moist woods of northern North America ( from northern Alaska to central Northwest Territories to Labrador, Newfoundland and Greenland, south to central California, Idaho, Wyoming, Minnesota, northern Wisconsin and Michigan's Upper Peninsula ). It is endangered in Ontario ( mostly localized on north shore of Lake Superior ), Wyoming, Colorado and Wisconsin. It is also native to northern Eurasia, south in mountains to Spain and Greece in southern Europe, to northeast Mongolia to Japan.
The fronds, up to 2 feet or rarely 40 x 12 inches, are deep green.
This Fern can be grown from zone 1 to 5 in a cool, moist, shady environment. In the wild it is often found along stream banks in coniferous forests.

* photo of unknown internet source


Dryopteris felix-mas ( Male Fern )
A vigorous, large, upright, deciduous to evergreen Fern reaching a maximum size of 5 x 5 feet, that is native to northern Eurasia, western North America and the Great Lakes ( Wisconsin, Michigan, the north shores of Lake Superior and Huron and southern Ontario to Newfoundland ). In Eurasia this fern is common in the wild; in North America it is endangered in the east and local in the west. It has also naturalized in New Zealand.
This Fern looks outstanding when massed in a woodland environment.
The elegant, lacy, triangular, semi-evergreen fronds, up to 60 x 12 inches, are light green at first, turning to deep green. The bipinnate fronds are composed of 16 to 30 pairs of lance-shaped pinnae, up to 8 inches in length, with lobed and toothed leaflets. The stems are brownish. In areas with long gentle autumns, the foliage turns bright yellow late in autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist to wet soil that is rich in humus. Tolerates some sun if planted on a wet site. It also tolerates poor soil and some drought. Easy to grow and often self sows.

* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD



* historic archive photo


'Barnesii'
A very slender, stiff upright Fern reaching up to 4 x 3 feet, with narrow deep green fronds up to 52 x 6 inches.

'Crispatissima'
A moderate growing, compact, upright Fern reaching up to 2 x 2 feet. The mid-green fronds are wavy edged.

'Cristata Jackson'
A fast growing, large clumping Fern reaching up to 4 feet in height.
The fronds have carved crests at the frond peak and leaflet tips.

'Grandiceps' ( Crested Male Fern )
A strong rapid grower, reaching up to 4 feet in height with very lacy, long arching fronds that are crested at the end. The leaflets are also crested at the tips.

'Incisa'
A massive vigorous cultivar, reaching up to 5 feet in height, with huge fronds, up to 16 inches across, with narrow leaflets..

'Linearis Polydactyla' ( Many Fingered Male Fern )
A moderate growing, deciduous to semi-evergreen Fern reaching up to 4 x 4 feet.
The fancy, very lacy, leathery, mid-green fronds have slender segments with long diverent crests. The foliage is mid-green.

'Undulata Robusta ( Robust Male Fern )
Forms vigorous, full, semi-evergreen clumps up to 5 x 4 feet in size.
The arching lacy, green fronds have heavy waved pinnules.
Very easy to grow, it even has excellent drought tolerance.
It is excellent for naturalizing.

* photo taken on Oct 17 2013 in Olney, MD


Dryopteris formosana
An evergreen Fern, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 3 feet, that is native to mountain woods of Japan, Taiwan and the Phillipines.
The fronds, up to 40 x 14 inches, are deep green.
Hardy zones 6 to 9.

Dryopteris fragrans ( Fragrant Wood Fern )
A small semi-evergreen Fern native to most of Alaska, most of Canada, northern Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan's Upper Peninsula, Maine, Greenland, northern Russia & western & northern Mongolia on shaded limestone. It is endangered in Alberta, Wisconsin, New York State, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.
The fronds are up to 16 x 3 inches.
Hardy zones 2 to 5

Dryopteris goldiana ( Giant Wood Fern )
A very strong growing, very long lived, large Fern, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 6 feet, that may after time form large colonies up to 15 feet across. It is the largest Drypopteris Fern over much of its native range of cool, moist rich forests in eastern North America ( from Manitoba to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Lions Head, Ontario to Haliburton, Ontario to New Brunswick; south to central Arkansas to northern Alabama to central North Carolina ). It is endangered in Minnesota, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Maryland, New Jersey, Connecticut, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine. It has never been abundant around the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region except for locally around Amherstburg before 1900. It occurred sporadically on the Lake Erie shore during that time. It looks great planted next to water.
The large coarse, leathery, scaly fronds, up to 60 x 18 inches, are yellowish at first, turning to glossy deep green. The bipinnate fronds are composed of 12 to 16 pairs of lance-shaped pinnae, up to 6 inches in length, with deeply cut and toothed leaflets. The slender stalks are tan color.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on cool, moist, fertile soil.
Easy to grow.

* photo taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Dryopteris hondoensis ( Hondo Wood Fern )
A vigorous evergreen Fern, reaching a maximum size of 2.5 x 3 feet, that is native to moist forests in China, Korea and Japan.
The triangular bipinnate fronds, up to 28 x 12 inches in size, are bright red at first, turning to bright green.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

Dryopteris intermedia ( Fancy Wood Fern )
A very beautiful, strong growing, upright, semi-evergreen to evergreen Fern, reaching up to 3 x 4 feet, that is native to rich woods in eastern North America, ( from International Falls, Minnesota around the northern shore of Lake Superior to near the southern tip of James Bay to the Gaspe Pen. of Quebec to Newfoundland; south to Iowa to northern Alabama to North Carolina ). Before 1900 it was abundant throughout Windsor, Essex County, the Lake Erie islands and Ohio shore. It is often found in wetlands in the wild.
The double-pinnate, triangular fronds, up to 36 x 10 inches, are luxuriant mid-green.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in partial shade on neutral to acidic soil.

* photos taken on Aug 1 2011 in Luzerne Co., PA







* photos taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Dryopteris lacera ( Leathery Wood Fern )
A very beautiful, semi-evergreen Fern native to mountain forests of China, Korea and Japan. It forms a clump reaching a maximum size of 3 x 3 feet.
The arching, leathery, lance-shaped fronds, up to 24 x 10 inches, are verdant bright green.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 and thrives on well drained soil in the woodland understory. It will tolerate partial sun.

Dryopteris lepidopoda ( Sunset Fern )
An evergreen fern, reaching up to 2 x 2 feet, that is native to mountain forests from northern India to China and Taiwan.
The fronds are bronzy-orange at first, turning to very glossy deep green.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( protected site in 5 ) in partial to full shade. It is moderately drought tolerant once established.

Dryopteris ludoviciana ( Southern Wood Fern )
An upright, semi-evergreen to evergreen Fern reaching a maximum height of 4.5 feet, that is native to swamps of the southeastern U.S. from Arkansas to North Carolina and south.
The leathery fronds, up to 48 x 12 inches, are luxuriant, very glossy deep green. The bipinnate fronds are composed of 10 to 15 pairs of lance-shaped pinnae, up to 8 inches in length, with deeply cut and lobed leaflets. The erect stalks are slender and beige.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in partial to full shade on moist fertile soil. It is easy to grow, even outside its native range in places including parts of California. Tolerant of swampy conditions.

* photos taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Drypopteris marginalis ( Marginal Shield Fern )
Also called Eastern Wood Fern. An attractive, vigorous, long lived, sturdy Fern reaching up to 4 x 6.5 ( rarely over 2.5 ) feet, that is native to forests and swamps of eastern North America ( from Minnesota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Wawa, Ontario to Chalk River, Ontario to central Quebec to Newfoundland; south to central Oklahoma to northern Georgia ). The Marginal Shield Fern is also native to the southern tip of Greenland. It is endangered in Minnesota, Iowa and Delaware. In the Windsor/Essex County region; it was locally common around Windsor and very abundant on the Ohio shore before 1900. It also occurred sporadically at Detroit, Michigan during that time. It looks great in a shaded rock garden.
The upright, leathery, evergreen fronds, up to 48 x 10 ( rarely over 30 x 8 ) inches, arising from the woody crown are glossy, deep blue-green above, lighter green beneath. The bipinnate fronds are composed of 14 to 22 pairs of lance-shaped pinnae, up to 6 inches in length, with deeply cut leaflets.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in partial to full shade preferring moist, light, fertile, well drained soil rich in humus. Heat, alkaline, clay soil and even drought tolerant. Easy to grow.

* photo taken on Aug 1 2011 in Luzerne Co., PA


* photo taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Dryopteris x mickelii ( Mickels Wood Fern )
The rare hybrid between Dryopteris clintoniana & D. goldiana. It is a very vigorous Fern reaching up to 5 feet in height. One plant at the NY Botanic Gardens was 12 feet across with 200+ growing tips.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial to full shade. Easy to grow and tolerant of swampy conditions.

Dryopteris pseudo-filix-max ( Mexican Male Fern )
A rare spectacular Fern, native to high mountain forests of Mexico and Guatemala, that can form a vigorous, evergreen clump reaching up to 4 x 5 feet.
The erect fronds, reaching up to 48 x 10 inches, are glossy deep green. This Fern continues to produce new fronds throughout the entire growing season.
Surprisingly hardy considering its native range, north to zone 5. Easy to grow but does grow most vigorously in partial to full shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil. It is drought tolerant once established.

* photos taken on May 3 2014 in Baltimore Co., MD


Dryopteris pseudomas
A beautiful robust, semi-evergreen Fern, reaching a maximum size of 5 feet.
It makes for a stunning landscape plant.
The large arching fronds are golden-green at first, later turning rich green.
The stems are scaly and golden.
Hardy zones 3 to 8. Tolerant of drier soil.

'Cristata Angustata'
A dwarf form only reaching up to 20 inches in height, with narrow fronds that are neatly created.

Drypoteris pycnopteroides ( Japanese Wood Fern )
An evergreen fern, reaching up to 2 x 2 feet, that is native to Japan.
The curved, erect fronds, up to 2 feet in length, are bright green at first, turning to glossy deep green. The stems are black providing stunning contrast.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( reports of 5 on protected sites ) in partial to full shade.

* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


Dryopteris x remota ( Scaly Buckler Fern )
A strong growing, impressive, medium-size, deciduous to evergreen Fern reaching up to 3.3 x 4 feet that is the hybrid between Dryopteris affinis & D. expansa.
This is a hybrid of European origin that is found in the wild in Ireland and from central Europe to western Asia.
The graceful, arching, broad horizontal fronds, up to 40 x 10 inches, are finely lacey dissected. The bright green fronds have a golden-yellow midrib.
It is good for colonizing a woodland understory and easily self sows.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, well drained soil.
Easy to grow.

Dryopteris sichotensis
A large, semi-evergreen Fern reaching a maximum height of 52 inches, that is native to northeastern Asia.
Hardy zones 4 to 8

Dryopteris sieboldii ( Siebold's Fern )
A tidy, exotic-looking, small evergreen Fern that is native to mountain forests of China and Japan.
The fronds, up to 30 x 20 ( rarely over 20 x 6 ) inches, have 3 to 5 pairs of undivided very leathery, lance-shaped pinnae, up to 10 x 3 inches. It is evergreen to 0 F. The foliage is deep blue-green above, lighter green beneath.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in partial to full shade on fertile, moist, acidic soil.

Dryopteris stewartii ( Stewart's Wood Fern )
A medium sized, semi-evergreen Fern reaching up to 4 feet, that is native to high mountain forests in the Himalayas from Afghanistan and Pakistan to northern India and Nepal.
The fronds are up to 40 x 14 inches.
Hardy zones 6 to 9

Dryopteris tokyoensis ( Tokyo Wood Fern )
A vigorous, slender, vase-shaped, deciduous Fern, forming a clump up to 3 x 3 feet, that is native to China, Korea and Japan. It usually takes 3 years to reach its full height of 3 feet. Can be used as a focal point in a shaded garden.
The erect, narrow fronds, up to 36 x 10 inches, are luxuriant mid-green.
The pinnate fronds are composed of long oblanceolate leaflets.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial to full shade. Very easy to grow.

Dryopteris uniformiis ( Uniform Wood Fern )
An erect, evergreen ( deciduous in cold climates ) fern, reaching up to 2.5 feet, that is native to forests of eastern China, Korea and Japan.
The bipinnate, pointed-oval fronds, up to 28 x 8 inches in size, are deep green.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 and is very adaptable.

'Cristata' ( Crested Uniform Wood Fern )
An erect, dense, deciduous Fern, reaching a maximum height of 2.5 feet with very beautiful, heavily-crested fronds that are deep green.

Dryopteris wallichiana ( Wallich's Wood Fern )
A very graceful, strong growing, massive, semi-evergreen Fern with upright triangular fronds up to 7 x 5 feet that are frilly and glossy very deep green. The beautiful new fronds are often deep red at first. The stems are usually black. It is native from Mexico to Argentina as well as in southern Asia from Turkey eastwards to Indonesia.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist soil that is rich in humus.
It thrives in the Pacific Northwest. It hates hot summers in the east but is ok in the Pocono Mountains. A winter mulch is recommended.

2 comments:

  1. Hi Mr. Stewart,

    I found this beautiful Dryopteris x australis picture of yours and would like permission to use it. I represent a non-profit native plant education group in Atlanta, GA. We would like to use your picture in our catalog that we give schools as a fund-raiser to be able to plant their own native plant garden on their campus. Would this be alright with you if we use your picture? It would go on our website and in the printed catalogs. You would of course be named as the photographer.

    Thank you,
    Hilary


    Hilary Nichols
    Greenspace and Volunteer Coordinator

    EcoAddendum
    743-B3 E. College Ave
    Decatur, GA 30030
    678-999-4654 (office)
    Nichols.Hilary (a) gmail . com

    www.EcoAddendum.org
    www.BirdsButterfliesBees.org
    EcoAddendum is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit native plant educational organization supported through grants, membership, classes, volunteers and plant sales.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you! Just checked out both websites. Really like what I see! I will be in a class all day tomorrow but will be calling over the weekend. You can reach me at 301-379-4880

    ReplyDelete