Saturday, July 2, 2011

Blazing Stars

Liatris
A genus of tuberous rooted, mostly summer blooming perennials that are part of the larger Aster family. All species are native to North America.
Prefer full sun to partial shade on fertile soil.
They can multiple rapidly and are easy to reproduce from seed, division ( every 3 to 4 years but not required ) during autumn or spring and root cuttings. Most are drought resistant as well as tolerant to heat, fire, salt, hail and deer.


* photo taken on Aug 3 2011 in Hyde Park, NY

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Liatris acidota ( Sharp Blazing Star )
A perennial, reaching up to 3 x 1 foot, that is native to moist sites in Texas and southwestern Louisiana.
It bears deep lavender flowers during mid summer.
Hardy zones 7 to 9.

Liatris aspera ( Rough Blazing Star )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6.6 x 2 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, that is native to open sandy woodland and prairie in central North America ( from central North Dakota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Grand Bend, Ontario; south to Texas to South Carolina. It may also be native to far southern Manitoba. It is endangered in Ontario through is still locally common in the Ojibway Prairie Complex in Windsor.
The linear leaves are up to 16 inches in length.
The pinkish-purple flowers are borne on elegant spikes, up to 1.5 feet in length, during late summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.

* photos of unknown internet source



Liatris elegans ( Pinkscale Blazing Star )
A fast growing perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 6.5 feet, that is native from Oklahoma to South Carolina; south to eastern Texas to central Florida.
The purplish-pink flowers are borne all summer long.
Hardy zones 7 to 9.

Liatris graminifolia ( Shaggy Blazing Star )
Also called Liatris pilosa. A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 feet x 20 inches, that is native to dry open woodlands and sand dunes in the eastern U.S. ( from Philadelphia, PA to central New Jersey; south to western North Carolina to central South Carolina ). It is nearly extinct in Kentucky and absent from Tennessee.
The very narrow leaves are up to 12 x 0.3 inches in size.
The pink flower spikes appear early to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on very well drained soil.

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photos taken on Aug 13 2016 in Reisterstown, MD

* photos taken on Sep 16 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photo taken on Sep 25 2016 near Reisterstown, MD


Liatris helleri ( Heller's Blazing Star )
An upright perennial, reaching up to 22 inches in height, that is native to open high peaks and open dry pine/oak scrub of the Appalachian Mountains ( western Maryland, West Virginia, western Virginia, western North Carolina and far northern Georgia ). It is critically endangered in the wild and is further threatened by recreational activities. Populations in Virginia and West Virginia belong to subspecies 'Helleri'.
The linear leaves are up to 9 inches in length.
The bright purple spikes flowerheads, up to 9 inches in length, appear mid-summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 6 in full sun on well drained soils. In low elevations, it is much more likely to thrive in cooler maritime climates such as northern New England.

Liatris ligulistylis ( Meadow Blazing Star )
A very attractive perennial, reaching up to 6 ( rarely over 3 ) feet in height, that is native to sandy prairies in central North America ( from near Edmonton, Alberta to southern Saskatchewan to northern Wisconsin; south to northern New Mexico and Colorado to southern Illinois ). It is critically endangered in Nebraska and also endangered in Alberta.
The very narrow, drooping leaves are up to 6 inches in length. The mid-green leaves have a white midrib.
The abundant flowers, up to 1.2 inches wide, are deep red in bud, opening to purple. They are borne late summer into early autumn. The flowers are highly attractive to Monarch Butterflies.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun on moist, fertile soil.

Liatris microcephela ( Appalatian Blazing Star )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 1.5 ( rarely over 2 ) feet, that is native to dry sandy prairies in the southern Appalachian Mountains ( from central Kentucky to western North Carolina; south to northern Alabama & Georgia ). It is endangered in the Carolinas. Great for borders, rock gardens and containers.
The fine-textured, linear leaves are glossy green. The grassy foliage forms attractive, compact clumps when not in bloom.
The purplish-pink flowers are borne on abundant spikes during late summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. A low maintenance plant that is very tolerant of dry clay and hot summers.

* photo taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* video found on Youtube


Liatris novae-angliae ( Northern Blazing Star )
Also called L. borealis. A perennial, reaching maximum height of 3 feet that is native from New England, south to eastern New York State.
The reddish-purple flowers are borne on panicles during late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on dry sandy soil.

Liatris punctata ( Dotted Blazing Star )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 2 ( averaging 2 ) feet, that is native to dry grasslands of North America ( from Calgary, Alberta to Saskatchewan to Manitoba to far northwest Wisconsin; south to New Mexico to central Arkansas ). It makes a great rock garden plant.
The linear leaves are up to 6 x 0.3 inches in size. The foliage is gray-green.
The purplish-pink flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne on abundant, dense panicles during late summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on just about any well drained soil. It is deep rooted and very drought tolerant.

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Liatris pycnostachya ( Kansas Blazing Star )
A vigorous, clumping perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6.5 x 2.3 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, that is native to the central U.S. ( from northwest North Dakota to northeast Minnesota to central Wisconsin to northern Indiana; south to eastern Texas to Louisiana ). It is endangered in Nebraska and Indiana.
The very narrow leaves are up to 16 inches in length.
The bright purple flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are borne on bottlebrush-like panicles up to 30 inches in length during mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. It requires well drained soil, especially during winter.

* photo of unknown internet source

* historical archive photo


'Alba'
White flowers.

'Alexander'
Purple flowers and deep green foliage.

'Eureka'
Reaches up to 5 feet.

Liatris scariosa ( Tall Blazing Star )
A long lived perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6.5 x 2 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, that is native to dry open woodlands in the eastern U.S.( from central Missouri to southern Wisconsin to central Michigan to central New York State to far southern Maine; south to northwest Arkansas to northern Georgia to central South Carolina ). It is extinct in Arkansas and New Jersey; endangered in Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine and North Carolina. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was moderately common along the Detroit River and the Leamington area as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The very narrow leaves, up to 12 x 1 inches in size, are deep green.
Large button flowers borne on spikes during late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on light, well drained soil.

'September Glory'
Reaches a maximum height of 5 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, with deep purple flowers.

'White Spires'
Reaches a maximum size of 4 x 3 feet, with white flowers.

Liatris spicata ( Dense Blazing Star )
A clumping perennial, reaching up to 6.5 feet x 32 inches ( rarely over 3 feet ), that is native to moist meadows in the U.S. ( from Missouri to southern Wisconsin to central Michigan to Grand Bend, Ontario to Toronto, Ontario to Maine; south to Louisiana to northern Florida ). Endangered in the wild in Canada, Missouri, Wisconsin, New York State, Maryland and Delaware. Its range is scattered over much of its natural range in the U.S. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it occurred at the Ojibway Prairie in Lasalle and was abundant on the Ohio shore ( esp. at Castalia Prairie ) during the 1800s. The largest current remaining population in Canada is in the tallgrass prairie at Wapole Island First Nation.
The linear leaves, up to 16 x 0.8 inches in size, form a low grassy clump. The foliage is glossy deep green.
The purplish-pink flowers, up to 0.5 inches wide, are borne on dense, bottlebrush-like spikes, up to 30 inches in length, during mid-summer, often lasting into early autumn. The flowers look great with orange Daylilies and blue flowers.
The flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Small birds eat the seeds but if unsightly, the old flower stalks can be cut down after the first fall frost.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun on moist, fertile, well drained soil. Tolerates much poorer sites and alkaline soil but does not enjoy winter wetness ( however tolerates wet soil more than other species ). Drought tolerant. Long lived and does not need dividing. Deer resistant but powdery mildew may be a problem on sites with poor air circulation.
Easy to grow from seed.

* photos taken on June 28 2011 in Columbia, MD





* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on July 7 2017 in Columbia, MD

* historical archive photo


'August Glory'
Flowers are deep blue-purple.

'Floristan Violet'
Vigorous in habit, reaching a maximum height of 6 ( rarely over 4 ) feet with deep violet flowers borne on large, sturdy spikes.

'Floristan White'
Reaches a maximum height of 6 ( rarely over 4 ) feet with white flowers borne on large spikes. Looks good mixed with 'Floristan Violet'.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


'Kobold'
Compact in habit, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 2.5 ( rarely over 2.5 ) feet with purplish-pink to light purple flowers borne on spikes up to 15 inches in length, during summer.
The leaves are up to 10 inches in length.

* photos taken on June 10 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Aug 1 2013 in Goderich, Ontario

* photo taken on Aug 2 2013 in Stratford, Ontario

* photo taken on July 26 2015 @ Niagara Parks Bot. Gardens, Niagara Falls, ON


'Resinosa'

* photos taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.


'Floristan White'
Reaches up to 4 feet with white flowers.

Liatris squarrosa ( Scaly Blazing Star )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6 x 3 feet, that is native to eastern North America ( from central South Dakota to northern Iowa to Detroit, Michigan to Maryland; south to eastern Texas to far northern Florida ). It is extinct in Michigan and Delaware; endangered in Colorado, Ohio, West Virginia and Maryland. It occurred sporadically on the Ohio shore ( especially at Castalia Prairie ) during the 1800s. It is found on dry sandy prairie or oak-savanna in the wild.
The leaves are up to 12 inches in length.
The rosy-pink flowers are borne mid-summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on light, well drained soil. Drought tolerant.

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

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