Saturday, July 2, 2011

Lupine

Lupinus
A genus of perennials that are part of the massive Legume family which also includes the Acacias and Honey Locust.
Most species of Lupine prefer full sun on fertile, slightly acidic, light, well drained soil. Lupines do not like clay.
Propagation is from seed which is soaked in water for 24 hours before sowing outdoors during late fall or spring. Either sow them in their permanent place or transplant while small as they do not like root disturbance.
Propagation can also be achieved with transplanting small offshoots that appear at the base of the plant.
Pests and diseases affecting Lupines include: Aphids, Leaf Spot, Mildew and foliage Rust.




* photo taken by Sheri Hagwood @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photos


Lupinus albicaulis
text coming soon

'Hederma'

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.


Lupinus arboreus ( Tree Lupine )
A dense, rounded, evergreen shrub, reaching up to 7 x 5 feet, that is native to cliffs and open woods in coastal central California. It has naturalized northward to southwest British Columbia.
The palmately-compound leaves are composed of 5 to 12 leaflets. The leaflets are up to 2.5 inches long. The foliage is gray-green.
The fragrant, yellow ( rarely blue ) flowers are borne on dense spikes, up to 10 inches long, during winter into spring, sometimes randomly the rest of the year.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on fertile, well drained soil. Tree Lupine prefers cooler summers that aren't excessively humid. It is tolerant of coastal conditions and salt spray. It is easy to propagate from seed and on some sites may self seed invasively.

* historic archive photos


Lupinus chamissonis ( Dune Lupine )
A shrub, reaching up to 7 x 10 feet, that is native to coastal California. The roots fix their own nitrogen.
The dense hairy leaves are blue-green to silvery-gray. The leaves are composed of 7 to 10 leaflets.
The blue to blue-violet flowers are borne on spikes up to 8 inches in length, mid spring to mid summer. The flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil. Tolerant of salt spray and drought.

Lupinus palmeri ( Palmer's Lupine )
A perennial, reaching up to 2 feet, that is native to the southwestern U.S. ( from northern California to central Nevada to southwest Utah; south into Mexico ).
The blue flowers are borne during late spring.
Hardy zones 6 to 9

Lupinus perennis ( Wild Lupine )
Also called Sundial Lupine. A rhizomatous, herbaceous perennial, reaching a maximum height of 4 ( rarely over 2 ) feet, that is native to dry open oak savanna and prairie in eastern North America ( from central Minnesota to central Michigan to Grand Bend, Ontario to Niagara Falls to Maine; south to Louisiana to northern Florida ). It is endangered in Iowa, Ontario, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, New Hampshire and Vermont. It is extinct in the wild in Maine. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was locally common in the Lasalle and Leamington areas during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit, Michigan and moderately common on the Ohio shore during that time. In the Windsor/Detroit region; it can still be found at the Ojibway Prairie in Windsor.
Each palmate leaf contains 7 to 11 oblanceolate leaflets, up to 2 x 0.5 inches in size. The foliage is bright green.
The blue flowers, up to 0.7 inches long, are borne on dense spikes, up to 8 inches in length, from late spring to mid-summer.
The peapod like fruit are poisonous.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on dry, sandy, acidic, very well drained soil. It is tolerant of pure sand. Use southern seed source only in the deep south.

* photos taken on June 1 2011 in Ellicott City, MD

* historical archive photo

* photo taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON

* historic archive photo


Lupinus polyphyllus ( Streamside Lupine )
A thick root stocked perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 3.3 feet, that is native to western North America ( from Anchorage, Alaska to Fort Nelson, British Columbia to Cranbrook, B.C. to central Montana; south to central California ).
The leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are composed of up to 17 leaflets. The foliage is mid-green.
The showy flowers, up to 0.5 inches, are borne on dense, tapering spikes up to 2 feet in length, during early to mid summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. Surprisingly tolerant of heat and humidity.

* photo of unknown internet source

* historic archive photos


Lupinus rivularis ( Streambank Lupine )
A taprooted perennial, reaching up to 2 feet in height, that is native to sandy riverbanks from Vancouver Island and Fraser Valley in southwestern British Columbia to northwestern California. It has declined considerably and is now critically endangered in Canada.
The lavender flowers are borne on an upright raceme up to 10 inches long.

* photo taken by The Wild Garden, www.nwplants.com


Lupinus sericeus ( Silky Lupine )
A dense, upright, clumping perennial, reaching up to 2 feet, that is native to western North America ( from Bella Coola, British Columbia to Calgary, Alberta to Medicine Hat, Alberta; south to Oregon to central Nevada to northern Arizona to Colorado ). A separate population is known to occur at Carcross in southwest Yukon.
The palmate compound leaves are composed of narrow gray-green leaves.
The mid to deep blue flowers are borne on dense, upright spikes.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil.

Lupinus subalpinus ( Subalpine Lupine )
Also called Lupinus arcticus ssp. subalpinus. An upright perennial, reaching up to 15 inches in height, that is native to alpine meadows and open mountain woodland in western North America ( from far northern Alaska to northwest Nunavut; south to northern Oregon to Banff National Park, Alberta ). It is among the most beautiful of all Lupines.
The palmately-compound leaves are composed of 6 to 9 leaflets, up to 3 inches in length. The leafstalks are up to 12 inches in length.
The abundant, violet-blue flowers are borne on an inflorescence, up to 12 inches in length, during mid-summer.
Hardy zones 2 to 6, requiring cool, moist summers.

* historical archive photo


Hybrids
Flowers borne on showy, erect spikes during early to mid summer.
The foliage is glossy mid-green.
Many hybrids have the west coast native Lupinus polyphyllus in their parentage.
Most are hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on cool, moist, acidic to neutral, deep, fertile, light, well drained soil. In cold climates, mulch during the winter to protect the roots. They are generally short lived perennials that need to be replaced every other year but their lifespan can be increased an extra year by cutting to the base immediately after blooming.
Hybrid Lupines are prone to aphids and do not grow well in the hot, humid southeast or Midwest ( use Baptisia instead there ).

* photos of unknown internet source




* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photo


Lupinus 'Chandelier'
Reaches up to 4 feet, with spikes of creamy-white and yellow flowers borne during early summer.

Lupinus 'Chatelaine'
Reaches up to 4 feet, with spikes of pink and white flowers.

Lupinus 'Gallery Hybrids'
Reaches a maximum size of 20 x 15 inches. The come in various named cultivars based on color, including 'Gallery Blue', 'Gallery Mixture', 'Gallery Pink', 'Gallery Red', 'Gallery White' and 'Gallery Yellow'.

Lupinus 'My Castle'
Reaches up to 4 feet, with spikes of deep orange-red flowers.

* photo of unknown internet source


Lupinus 'Noble Maiden'
Reaches up to 4 feet, with spikes of pure white flowers.

Lupinus 'Russell's Hybrids'
Reaches a maximum size of 6 x 3 feet, with spikes of flowers varying in color.

* photo of unknown internet source


Lupinus 'The Governor'
Reaches up to 6 feet, with spikes of blue to purplish flowers.

* photo of unknown internet source


Lupinus 'The Page'
Reaches up to 4 feet, with spikes of deep red flowers.

No comments:

Post a Comment