Saturday, October 29, 2011

Acacias

Acacia

Among the most valuable ornamental trees in the drier parts of the world. This massive genus of plants within the larger Legume family, contains over 1200 species of plants, 900 which are native to Australia, the remainder being native to the Americas, Africa and milder parts of Asia. Many provide shelter, shade and timber in dry regions where few other sizeable trees will grown.
Most prefer full sun and well drained soil. Most are propagated from seed, many also propagated from semi-ripe cuttings over heat. Typically germination is greatly improved by pouring boiling water over them and letting them to cool by soaking in cold water over 24 hours. Rubbing sandpaper over the seedcoats can also be done. Germination is rapid.

* photos taken on Jan 3 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida.

* photos of unknown internet source



Many Acacias are psychoactive ( marked ^ at end of text description ) and contain the same chemical that makes people and animals dream.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_psychedelic_plants ( video posted beneath )

http://www.erowid.org/plants/acacia/acacia.shtml



Acacia acinacea ( Gold-Dust Wattle )
A decorative spreading shrub with long arching branches, native to semi-arid parts of southeastern Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 10 feet; largest on record - 10 x 13 feet.
The oblong, obovate or rounded phyllode leaves, up to 1 x 0.5 inches, are deep blue-green.
Profuse, golden-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.2 inches across, are borne singly or paired from the leaf axils during late spring and spring.
They are followed by curved, twisted pods.
The twigs are angled.
The smooth bark is gray to dark brown.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 in full sun to partial shade. It is drought and heavy clay tolerant. Prune lightly after flowering to encourage new growth.

'Ruby Tips'
Bright red new foliage

Acacia abyssinica
A medium-sized tree, reaching a maximum height of 66 ( rarely over 53 ) feet, that is native to Africa. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The bipinnate leaves are up to 11 inches in length.
The puffy flowerballs are white.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating as low as 15 F ).

Acacia acradenia
A large shrub or small tree, reaching a maximum height of 25 ( rarely over 13 ) feet in height, that is a widespread native to arid northern Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 5 feet.
The elliptical leaves are up to 6 x 1.2 inches.
The golden-yellow to orange flower spikes are up to 2.5 inches in length.
The twigs are orange-brown.
The red-gray to brown bark is smooth when young, later turning fibrous.

Acacia acuminata ( Raspberry Acacia )
A fast growing, dense, rounded tree reaching a maximum size of 47 x 33 feet, that is native to southwestern Australia. Some records include: 10 months - 4.5 feet; 3 years - 10 feet; largest on record - trunk diameter of 1.5 feet. It is known to resprout after fire but rarely suckers otherwise. It is moderately long-lived, exceeding 50 years.
The linear to narrow-elliptic leaves, up to 10 x 0.4 ( rarely over 7 ) inches, are mid-green.
The golden-yellow flower spikes are up to 1.3 inches in length.
Hardy zones 8 to 10, requiring mediterranean climates. It tolerates drought but not waterlogged soils.

Acacia adsurgens
A spreading shrub or small tree, reaching a maximum size of 23 ( rarely over 13 ) feet in height, that is a widespread but rare native to the arid parts of northern Australia.
Some records include: 6 years - 8 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 inch.
The linear leaves, up to 8 x 0.2 inches, are glossy mid-green.
The cylindrical, golden-yellow flower spikes are up to 0.8 inches in length.
The twigs are reddish or light brown.
The fibrous bark is gray-brown peeling to reveal reddish-brown bark beneath.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( partial dieback recorded at 16 F ).

Acacia adunca ( Wallangarra Wattle )
Also called Cascade Wattle. A rapid growing, large bushy shrub or small tree reaching a maximum size of 47 x 20 ( rarely over 33 ) feet that is native to dry forests in far northeast New South Wales in Australia.
The narrow linear, phyllode leaves, up to 6 x 0.1 inches in length, are bright green to blue-green.
The profuse, showy, sweetly fragrant, golden-yellow flower balls, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne in long sprays during late winter and spring.
The slender twigs are red-brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 in full sun on well drained soil.

Acacia albida
A beautiful large tree similar in appearance to a mature Gleditsia-Honeylocust.
Some records include: 3 years - 23 feet; largest on record - 110 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet.
Hardy north to zone 9a, tolerating as low as 18 F. Roots have been found as deep as 270 feet.

Acacia alpina ( Alpine Wattle )
A dense, low spreading shrub, rarely much taller to 8 feet and spreading as much as 33 feet, that is native to far southeastern Australia.
The broad obovate phyllode leaves, up to 1.8 x 1.1 inches, are gray-green.
The cylindrical bright yellow flowers, up to 0.6 inches in length, are paired or borne singly along the stems during spring.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 8 F. It is also tolerant of snow.

Acacia amblygona ( Fan Wattle )
A low spreading shrub native to eastern Australia.
Some records include: 3 years - 5 ( rarely over 3 ) feet; largest on record - 8 x 10 ( rarely over 3 ) feet.
The lower growing forms can valuable for use as groundcover.
The sharply pointed, triangular, phyllode leaves, up to 0.8 x 0.2 inches, are mid- green.
The singular, golden-yellow flower balls, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne winter into early spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11

Acacia amoena ( Boomerang Wattle )
A dense, rounded, large shrub reaching up to 13 feet that is native to highlands in southeastern Australia.
The thick, leathery, oblanceolate phyllode leaves, up to 3.4 x 0.7 inches, are gray-green.
The showy, intense, bright golden-yellow flower balls, up to 0.2 inches across, are borne in short sprays, up to 2.6 inches in length, during late winter and early spring. They are followed by dark brown pods, up to 3.5 x 0.2 inches.
The twigs are reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 8 to 10

Acacia ampliceps ( Salt Wattle )
A fast growing, suckering, bushy, semi-pendulous, spreading, large shrub or small tree, reaching a maximum height of 30 feet, that is a widespread native to northwestern Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 9 feet; 3 years - 15 feet.
It makes a great windbreak and is highly valuable for reclaiming salty soil.
The linear to narrow lance-shaped leaves, up to 10 x 1.2 inches, are bright green.
The creamy-white flower balls are borne on racemes up to 4 inches in length.
The twigs are yellowish.
Hardy zones 9 to 10, thriving in hot arid climates. Freezes to ground at 18 F

Acacia amythethophylla
A bushy shrub or small tree, reaching a maximum height of 17 feet, with a tiny natural range of sand dunes around Shark Bay on the central part of Australia's west coast. Some records include: 7 years - 17 feet.
The oblanceolate leaves, up to 4.8 x 0.6 inches, are blue-green.
The pale yellow flower balls are borne on racemes up to 1.4 inches in length.

Acacia aneura ( Mulga )
A long lived, moderate growing, evergreen shrubby tree up to 25 feet that is native to much of the dry interior of Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 4 years - 12 feet; 10 years - 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 inches; largest on record - 60 x 23 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot. Mulga is long lived, exceeding 240 years.
Very deep rooted enabling it to survive in arid climates, a 4 foot tall tree was recorded to have a 10 foot taproot.
The flat, narrow, linear phyllode leaves, up to 5 x 0.4 ( rarely over 3 ) inches in length, are gray-green to blue-green above, silvery beneath.
The profuse, golden-yellow flowers are borne on dense spikes, up to 1.2 inches in length, during spring and summer, irregularly the rest of the year.
The fissured bark is dark gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 tolerating as low as 15 F, it thrives in climates with 8 to 20 inches of rainfall per year.

Acacia angustissima ( Fern Acacia )
A thornless, fast growng large shrub native from Kansas to Missouri south to Costa Rica, reaching around 8 x 6 feet though may be a small tree more than double that.
Some records include: 2 years - 6 feet; 2.5 years - 17 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.3 inches; largest on record - 23 feet. In cold climates where it grows as a perennial, it can be used for groundcover.
The attractive, finely-textured, fern-like foliage is mid-green.
The white, ball-shaped flowers are borne during summer and fall.
The flowers attract butterflies
Hardy zones 9 to 10 as a shrub, zone 6 to 8 as a perennial, tolerating as low as -10 F. It thrives in full sun to partial shade on just about any fertile, well drained soil. Drought tolerant.

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Acacia aphylla ( Leafless Rock Wattle )
A leafless but attractive shrub reaching up to 10 x 10 feet that is native to a tiny area just a little bit east of Perth in Australia where it is endangered. It looks like a succulent rather than an Acacia. This Acacia bears no leaves.
The spiny, silvery to gray-green branches are profusely covered by showy, bright yellow flower balls borne singly during spring.
They are followed by linear pods, up to 3.5 inches in length.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 in sun to partial shade on very well drained soil.

Acacia arabica ( Egyptian Acacia )
A medium size tree native to a vast area from Africa to southern Asia.
Some records include: 30 years - 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.6 feet; largest on record - 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 5.2 feet.
Hardy north to zone 9b

Acacia aroma
A thorny, spreading, small tree, reaching a maximum height of 20 feet, that is native to Bolivia, Peru, Paraguay and Argentina. It is closely related to Acacia macrantha.
Some records include: 2 years - 3 x 6 feet; 9 years - 13 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to 5.5 inches in length, are composed of 48 to 100 linear leaflets, up to 0.2 x 0.03 inches in size.
The pale yellow flower balls, up to 0.4 inches across, are borne from the leaf axils.
The twigs are dark purplish-brown.
The dark gray to dark brown bark is smooth at first, later becoming shallowly furrowed.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( slight damage at 16 F ).

Acacia ashbeyae
A very attractive, rounded, dense, spreading shrub, reaching a maximum height of 6.5 feet, that is native to southwestern Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 5 x 8 feet; 3 years - 6 x 10 feet.
The very narrow leaves, up to 3.5 inches in length, are gray-green.
The flowers are bright yellow.
Hardy zone 9 to 10 ( tolerating 19 F or slightly colder ) in mediterranean climates, preferring sandy soil.

Acacia atramentaria
A flat-topped tree, reaching a maximum height of 40 feet, that is native to northern Argentina. Some records include: 3 years - 6 feet; 8 years - 15 feet.
The bark is furrowed and dark gray.
Hardy zones 9a to 10 ( fully hardy to 16 F ).

Acacia aulacocarpa ( Golden Flowered Salwood )
A spreading tree, reaching a maximum height of 50 feet, that is native to the central and northern parts of Australia's east coast.
Some records include: 3 years - 10 feet; largest on record - 16 inch trunk diameter.
The leaves, up to 8 x 1.5 ( rarely over 5 ) inches, are blue-green.
The bright golden-yellow flower spikes are up to 2.4 inches in length.
The bark is smooth.
Hardy zones 9b to 10 ( est ) in subtropical to tropical climates.

Acacia auriculiformis
A moderately long lived, dense, rounded, large tree native to northern Australia, New Guinea and nearby parts of Indonesia. It is among the worlds fastest growing trees. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 25 feet; 2 years - 20 feet; 3 years - 41 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 inches; 5 years - 50 feet; 8 years - 60 feet; largest on record - 133 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
It is an excellent shade tree for subtropic and tropical areas worldwide.
The phyllode leaves, up to 12 x 2 inches, are glossy olive green.
The golden flowers are borne in profuse spikes as the tropical dry season begins.
They are profusely followed by contorted, leathery seed pods.
Hardy zones 10 to 12 in climates with average yearly rainfall of 30 inches or more.
Very soil tolerant, tolerating PH from 3 to 9^

* photo of unknown internet source


Acacia baeuerlenii
An evergreeen shrub, reaching a maximum height of 13 feet, that is native to the central part of Australia's east coast. Some records include: 3 years - 11 feet.
The linear leaves are up to 6 x 0.5 inches.
The creamy-white flower balls, up to 0.4 inches across, are borne in clusters of 1 to 3 from the lead axils.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( est ) in warm temperate to subtropical climates.

Acacia baileyana ( Cootamundra Wattle )
An elegant evergreen tree native to a small area around Cootamundra in the southern part of New South Wales in Australia. The outer branches gracefully droop.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; 5 years - 17 feet; 20 years - 40 x 40 feet; largest on record - 50 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet. Short lived, it usually only lives 20 years.
It has been planted as a street tree in parts of California.
The feathery bipinnate leaves, up to 2 inches in length, are silvery-gray.
The profuse, bright yellow, ball-shaped flowers are borne in dense, axilliary racemes, up to 4 inches in length, during winter and early spring.
The bark is smooth and silvery-gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 15 F, can recover from 12 F.
It prefers full sun on humus-rich, well drained soil. Drought tolerant. Deer resistant. Pruning after flowering encourages new growth and extends the life of the plant.

'Purpurea'
Attractive purplish foliage.

Acacia bakeri ( Baker's Wattle )
Among the largest of all Acacias, it can reach up to 170 x 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet with a dense rounded canopy. Due to habitat destruction within its natural range, trees exceeding even half that size are now extremely rare. It is slow growing, so the sizes of trees that greeted the settlers won't be around again for a long time. It originally grew in subtropical rainforests along a stretch of coastline on the center part of Australia's east coast.
The elliptical leaves, up to 5 x 1.3 inches, are deep green.
The creamy-yellow flowers are borne on racemes up to 4 inches in length.
They are followed by pods up to 8 x o.5 inches in size.
The close-grained hard, yellowish wood was once used for flooring and cabinetry. This tree is now in danger of extinction.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 in moist, humid subtropical climates.
Seed should be soaked in warm water for 4 hours or until they swell before sowing.

Acacia bancroftii ( Bancroft's Wattle )
A very attractive deciduous tree reaching up to 20 feet, that is native to inland areas in central Queensland Australia.
The very large, sickle-shaped phyllode leaves, up to 9 x 5.5 inches, are blue-green.
The bright yellow, ball-shaped flowers are borne in very long racemes during late autumn and winter.
Hardy zones 9 to 11, thriving in warm dry climates.

Acacia berlandieri ( Berlandier Acacia )
Also called Guajillo. A very attractive small semi-evergreen to evergreen tree that is native to hills of western and central Texas, south into Mexico. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 3 years - 5 feet; largest on record - 25 x 25 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 inches.
The fernlike bipinnate, Silktree-like leaves up to 6 inches in length are deep green.
The ferny foliage lends a tropical appearance to the desert landscape.
The fragrant, creamy-white flowerballs are borne during spring.
The stems are armed in curved short thorns.
Berlandier Acacia is toxic to livestock, it is also psychoactive.
It is one of the most cold hardy Acacias, tolerating as cold as 0 F in dry climates.
Extremely drought tolerant, thriving in areas with rainfall as low as 6 inches in a year.

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Acacia binervia ( Coast Myall )
Also called Acacia glaucescens. A very attractive, long lived, fast growing, dense tree native to eastern Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 13 feet; largest on record - 66 x 35 feet. Also makes an excellent windbreak.
The curved, elliptic phyllode leaves are up to 7 x 2 ( rarely over 5.5 ) inches in size.
The bright yellow flowers are borne in masses of narrow cylindrical, axilliary spikes, up to 2.3 inches in length, during early spring.
The deeply fissured and flaky bark is gray-brown to dark brown.
This plant is toxic to livestock.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F in full sun and partial shade.

Acacia bivenosa ( Two-Nerved Wattle )
A bushy, dense, rounded shrub, reaching a maximum height of 17 ( rarely over 12 ) feet, that is native to northwest and north central Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 8 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 inches.
The oval to oblong leaves, up to 2 x 1 inches, are blue-green.
The showy, bright yellow flower balls are borne from the leaf axils.
Hardy zones 9b to 11 ( plants freeze back to ground level at 19 F, resprouting vigorously ).

Acacia bonariensis
An evergreen shrub that is native to Paraguay and northern Argentina.
Some records include: 2 years - 4.5 feet.
Hardy zones 9 to 10

Acacia boormannii
A showy, fast growing, bushy, slender large shrub to small tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 17 ( rarely over 15 ) feet, that is native to subalpine zones in far southeastern Australia. It makes a great screen and windbreak.
The linear leaves, up to 3.5 inches in length, are gray-green.
The golden-yellow flower balls, up to 0.2 inches across, are borne on racemes, up to 1.6 inches in length. This plant is spectacular in bloom.
The branches are silvery. The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy north to zone 8 and is snow and clay tolerant, moderately salt tolerant. Requires average yearly rainfall of 20 inches or more.

Acacia borleae
A shrub that is native to South Africa.
Some records include: 3 years - 6.5 feet.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( tolerates 16 F with slight damage ).

Acacia brachybotrya ( Gray Mulga )
A moderate growing large shrub reaching a maximum size of 15 x 15 feet, that is native to semi-arid southeastern Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 12 feet.
The obovate leaves, up to 1.3 x 0.5 inches, are grayish-green to blue-green.
The red Manzanita-like bark looks amazing when exposed through pruning.
Hardy to 18 F

Acacia brachystacha ( Turpentine Mulga )
An evergreen shrub to small tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 17 feet, that is native to central Australia. Some records include: 9 years - 14 feet.
The very linear leaves are up to 7 x 0.1 inches, are blue-gray to blue-green.
The bright yellow, narrow cylindrical flower spikes, up to 0.8 inches in length, are borne 1 or 2 from the leaf axils.
The gray bark is smooth becoming fissured with age.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( tolerating 15 F ) in semi-arid to desert climates.

Acacia brandeegeana
A small, thicket-forming tree, reaching a maximum height of 23 feet, that is native to Baja California. Some records include: 9 years - 6 feet.
The pinnate leaves contain 4 to 14 tiny leaflets, up to 0.35 x 0.1 inches.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( fully hardy to 16 F ).

Acacia brunioides
A shrub reaching a maximum size of 6.5 x 5 feet, that is native to Australia's central east coast.
The densely crowded, narrow, needle-like phyllode leaves are up to 0.5 inches in length.
The showy large, globular, light yellow flowerheads are borne singly along the stems late winter into early spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11. Prune to shape after blooming.

Acacia burkitttii ( Pinbush Wattle )
An attractive, fast growing, dense, compact, large spreading shrub to small tree, reaching up to 33 x 15 ( rarely over 15 ) feet, that is native to semi-arid parts of southern Australia.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 in full sun to partial shade preferring sandy soil. Very drought tolerant.
The long, linear, phyllode leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are green.
The oblong spikes of small yellow flowers are borne late winter and spring.
Hardy zones 8 to 10. An excellent landscape plant for dry climates.

Acacia buxifolia ( Box-leaf Wattle )
An upright to spreading shrub reaching a maximum size of 13 x 9 feet that is native to the eastern Australian coast.
The leathery, narrow-elliptic, phyllode leaves, up to 1.5 x 0.3 inches, are gray-green.
The very showy, profuse, globular, golden-yellow flowers are borne in dense axilliary panicles, up to 1.8 inches in length, during winter and spring.
Hardy zones 8 to 10, it is very adaptable and tolerates both flood and drought. Pune regularly after flowering to encourage new growth and density.

Acacia caerulescens ( Buchan Blue Wattle )
A very attractive, very fast growing, dense, oval to rounded small tree, that is native to extreme southeastern Australia not including Tasmania. Some records include: first year - 10 feet; largest on record - 55 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet. It is endangered in the wild with just around 1700 plants left in existence. It makes an excellent landscape tree and should be widely planted where it is adapted in order to preserve it.
The obovate leaves, up to 3.2 x 1.3 inches, are blue-green.
The pale yellow flowerballs are borne on clusters, up to 3.5 inches in length.
Hardy zones 9 ( estimate...it may actually be hardier ). It is both lime and clay soil tolerant.

Acacia caffra
A medium size tree native to tropical and southern Africa.
Some records include: 4 years - 16 feet; 5 years - 18 feet; 9 years - 17 feet; largest on record - 66 feet.
The bipinnate leaves are up to 9 inches in length.
The flowers are cream colored.
Hardy north to zone 9b tolerating as low as 23 F

Acacia calamifolia
A shrub, reaching a maximum height of 13 feet, that is native to southeastern Australia.
The narrow-linear, phyllode leaves, up to 4.3 inches in length, are gray-green to green.
The flowers are borne on very showy, golden-yellow puffballs.
Hardy zones 9?

Acacia cana
A dense, spreading, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 20 feet, that is native to eastern Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 4 feet.
The linear leaves are up to 5 x o.1 inches in size. The very attractive foliage is bright gray-green.
The golden-yellow puffball flowers are very showy.
The bark is gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( fully hardy to 16 F ).

Acacia cardiophylla ( Wyalong Wattle )
A showy spreading, arching shrub or more rarely small tree that is native to New South Wales in Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 3 feet; largest on record - 17 x 13 ( rarely over 11 ) feet.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 2.5 inches, are composed of tiny, heart shaped leaflets.
The profuse, sweetly fragrant, globular, bright yellow flowers are borne in long panicles that cover the stems during late winter and spring.
The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 10

Acacia catechu ( Black Catechu )
A medium size tree native to Pakistan, India and Burma.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - diameter growth of 0.5 inches; 2 years - 10 feet; 1,5 years - 14 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.4 inches; 3 years - 20 feet; 10 years - 37 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 inches; 20 years - 54 feet; largest on record - 80 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.2 feet.
The fine bipinnate leaves are up to 6 inches in length.
The yellow flowers are borne in long spikes during spring.
The twigs are armed with hooked spines.
Hardy zones 9 to 12^

Acacia cavenia ( Cavan )
Also called Espanillo. An attractive twisted trunked, fast growing small tree.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; 2 years - 6 feet; 3 years - 9 feet; 4 years - 12 feet; largest on record - 30 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches. Often used as a hedge in its native Chile.
The bipinnate leaves are composed of tiny leaflets. The foliage is downy at first.
The yellow, ball-shaped flowers are borne from the leaf axils during spring.
The valuable timber is durable and very hard.
The flexible branches are spiny.
Hardy zones 8 to 11. Leaves undamaged at 19 F
Pharmacology: known to contain Tryptamine


* photo of unknown internet source



Acacia chinchillensis ( Chinchilla Wattle )
An attractive, fast growing, small spreading shrub is native to a small area in southern Queensland, Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 4;5 feet; largest on record - 6.6 x 6 feet.
The attractive, feathery, bipinnate foliage is gray-green. The leaflets are up to 0.3 inches in length.
The showy globular, golden-yellow flowers are borne in panicles during late winter and spring.
The bark is smooth and gray-brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 11. Trim regularly for increased density.

Acacia choriophylla
A thornless small tree reaching a maximum size of 20 x 24 feet, that is native to Florida.
Extremely drought tolerant.

Acacia citrinoviridis
An attractive weeping tree, reaching a maximum height of 50 feet, that is native to western Australia. Some records include: 6 years - 13 feet.
The linear to narrow-elliptic leaves are up to 6.5 x 0.5 inches in size.
The bark is fissured and gray.
Fully hardy to 17 F.

Acacia cognata ( River Wattle )
A rapid growing, gracefully weeping, small tree reaching up to 40 x 40 feet, that is native to coastal southeast Australia.
The narrow phyllode leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are bright green.
The globular, golden-yellow flowers are borne on short stalks during late winter and spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerates 20 F ) on moist soil in sun to partial shade.

Acacia concurrens
A fast growing tree, reaching a maximum size of 33 feet, that is native to the eastern Australia's center coast. Some records include: 3 years - 13 feet.
The obovate phyllode leaves, up to 7 x 2.3 inches, are blue-green.
The bright yellow flower spikes are up to 4.3 inches in length.
The fibrous fissured bark is grayish-black.
Hardy zones 9 to 10

Acacia conferta ( Crowded-Leaf Wattle )
An attractive fine shrub reaching a maximum size of 15 x 13 feet, that is native to dry areas of southeastern Queensland and nearby parts of New South Wales.
The very dense, nearly needle-like, narrow-oblong, deep gray-green phyllode leaves, are up to 0.5 inches in length.
The small, bright yellow, ball-shaped flowers are borne singly along the stems.
Hardy zones 9 to 11

Acacia confusa ( Formosan Acacia )
A medium-sized tree that is native to Taiwan and the Phillipines but has also become an exotic invasive weed in Hawaii. Some records include: largest on record - 66 x 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The narrow, lance-shaped, phyllode leaves are up to 4 x 0.4 inches, are dull green.
The golden-yellow flowerballs are up to 0.4 inches across.
The seeds are highly poisonous.
The slender twigs are smooth and brown.
The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy zones 10 to 12, preferring a subtropical to tropical climate.
Pharmacology: at a concentration of 1.4%, the roots contain among the worlds highest known concentrations of DMT.

* photo of unknown internet source


Acacia constricta ( Whitethorn Acacia )
A moderate growing, long-lived, large shrub to small tree reaching up to 10 x 15 feet, that is native to Nevada, Arizona to Texas. Some records include: 2 years - 8 feet; 7 years - 14 feet; 11 years - 16 feet. Generally evergreen, it becomes deciduous during extreme drought or cold. It makes an excellent barrier plant.
The soft yellow, puffy, ball-shaped flowers are borne during mid spring to early summer. They are nearly pollen free.
The flowers are followed by attractive deep reddish-brown seed pods, up to 5 inches in length.
The thorns are sharp and white.
Hardy zones 5a to 11, it is among the hardiest of all Acacias, though it is far less hardy in moister climates. Whitethorn Acacia prefers full sun and infrequent deep watering. Very drought and heat tolerant. Deer resistant.
Pharmacology: contains β-methyl-phenethylamine

* photo of unknown internet source


Acacia continua ( Thorn Wattle )
A dense, wiry-stemmed, rigid branched, shrub reaching a maximum height of 6.5 feet that is native to semi-arid parts of southcentral Australia.
The leathery, sharp-tipped, linear leaves, up to 1.6 ( rarely over 1 ) inches in length, are pressed so closely to the stems, that this plant appears leafless.
The foliage is green.
Small, showy, deep golden-yellow, ball-shaped flowers are borne from the leaf axils during early spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11

Acacia coriacea ( Wiry Wattle )
A slightly pendulous, small tree reaching up to 33 x 15 feet, that is a widespread native to northern Australia.
The narrow, linear phyllode leaves, up to 13 x 0.4 inches, are silvery-blue.
The the globular golden-yellow flowers, up to 0.3 inches across, are followed by curled pods, up to 8 inches in length.
The bark is fibrous.
Hardy north to zone 9b ( tolerating as low as 20 F ). At colder temperatures it will dieback to the base, resprouting rapidly to up to 7 feet during the following summer.
Pharmacology: unknown

Acacia cornigera ( Bullhorn Acacia )
A small tree, reaching up to 33 feet, that is native to Mexico and central America as well as around Tampa Bay in Florida.
Some records include: 1 year - 6 feet; 2 years - 7.5 feet; 4 years - 8 feet.
The luxuriant mid-green foliage is bipinnate.
Hardy zones 9 to 11
Pharmacology: contains Tryptamine

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Acacia coulteri
Some records include: 2 years - 6 feet; eventual size of 7.5 feet

Acacia covenyi ( Bluebush )
A rare fast growing tree, reaching a maximum size of 28 x 30 feet, that is native to far southeastern Australia.
The narrow oblong leaves, up to 2.3 x 0.4 inches, are silvery-blue.
The bright yellow flower puffballs, up to 0.2 inches across, are borne 5 to 8 on a clusters, up to 2.2 inches in length.
Hardy north to zone 8b tolerating 14 F. It thrives in climates with 20 + inches of yearly rainfall. Drought tolerant.

Acacia cowleana
A small tree, reaching a maximum height of 27 feet, that is native to central Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 9 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 inches.
The oblanceolate leaves, up to 9 x 1.5 inches, are gray-green.
The flower spikes, up to 2 inches in length, are golden-yellow.
The bark is fibrous.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating 20 F ). Only marginally hardy in Tucson

Acacia craspedocarpa ( Leatherleaf Acacia )
Also called Hop Mulga. An evergreen large shrub to small tree reaching a maximum size of 27 x 20 ( rarely over 20 ) feet, that is native to southwestern Australia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 4 years - 6 feet; 10 years - 9 feet.
The rounded leaves, up to 1 x 0.5 inches, are blue-gray.
The bright yellow flower spikes are up to 0.8 inches in length.
Hardy zones 8 to 10, thriving in semi-arid climates. Very drought tolerant.

Acacia crassicarpa ( Thick-Podded Salwood )
A long lived, tall spreading tree that is a widespread native to moist areas of eastern Australia often forming dense pure stands. One of the worlds fastest growing trees reaching up to 100 feet.
The long, curved phyllode leaves, up to 12 x 2 inches in size, are pale green to gray-green.
The golden-yellow flowers are borne in paired spikes during late winter and early spring.
The bark is dark gray-brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( slight damage at 16 F ).

Acacia cultriformis ( Knife-Leaf Wattle )
A tall, very dense, evergreen shrub with drooping branches that is native to Eucalyptus forests of New South Wales in eastern Australia. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 3 feet; 3 years - 10 feet; largest on record - 26 x 18 feet.
It makes an excellent hedge and screen.
The attractive, pointed-tipped, triangular, phyllode leaves, up to 1.5 x 0.6 inches, are blue-gray.
The lightly fragrant. bright yellow, ball-shaped flowers are borne in sprays up to 3 inches in length.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 tolerating as low as 10 F, does not like climates with high humidity. Prefers full sun ( tolerates partial shade ) on humus-rich, sandy, well drained soil. Tolerates heat, drought and seaside salt winds.
Pharmacology: contains Tryptamine

* photo of unknown internet source


'Austraflora Cascade'
A low groundcover form, reaching up to 1 x 13 feet.

Acacia cyclops ( Western Coastal Wattle )
A very attractive, dense, bushy, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 28 x 28 feet, that is native to the western and central part of the southern Australia coast.
Some records include: 10 months - 4.5 feet; 2 years - 8 x 5 feet.
The leathery, oblanceolate, willowy leaves, up to 4 x 0.6 inches, are green.
The pale yellow flowerballs, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne on 2 flowered racemes originating from the leaf axils.
Hardy zones 9 to 11( tolerates 10 F ). Drought tolerant and even thrives on pure sand & salt breezes, making it a great choice for stabilizing sand dunes.

Acacia davyi ( Corky Thorn )
An attractive, fast growing, evergreen tree, reaching up to 17 x 17 feet.
Some records include: 3 years - 6 feet.
The attractive, ferny bipinnate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are bright green.
The bright yellow flowerballs, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne during summer.
The attractive, corky to flaking bark ranges from creamy-yellow to light brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( partial damage at 16 F ) in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil.
Drought tolerant.

Acacia dealbata ( Silver Wattle )
A very fast growing, single trunked, broadly-conical large tree to around 70 feet that is native to mountain forests of southeastern Australia and Tasmania.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 feet; 3 years - 20 feet; 5 years - 33 feet; 20 years - 50 x 27 feet ( average ); 22 years - 70 feet; 28 years - 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet; largest on record - 150 x 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The ferny, bipinnate, blue-green leaves, up to 7 inches in length, are composed of many linear leaflets up to 0.3 inches. The finely-textured foliage is very attractive.
The abundant, very showy, very fragrant, bright yellow, ball-shaped flowers are borne in racemes up to 8 inches in length during late winter into spring.
The flowers are followed by seed pods up to 3 inches in length, that constrict between the seeds.
The branchlets are silvery. The bark is smooth and green, eventually becoming gray, developing cracks on older trees.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 8 F and it often resprouts from the ground if it did actually get colder. It thrives in milder parts of the British Isles. Prefers full sun and acidic, warm, well drained soil. Preferring consistent moisture, it can tolerate the occasional drought.

* photo of unknown internet source


subsp 'subalpina'
Originating from high mountains in Australia, it is more consistantly cold hardy but still unlikely to thrive north of zone 8.
It is vigorous, grows large and has very attractive silvery foliage.

Acacia deanii ( Deane's Wattle )
A small tree reaching a maximum height of 40 ( rarely over 23 ) feet, that is native to southeastern Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 5 feet; 10 years - 15 feet.
Makes an excellent screen plant.
The ferny bipinnate leaves are dull deep green.
The creamy-white flowerballs are up to 0.2 inches across.
The smooth bark is brownish-purple.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( fully hardy to 16 F ). Very drought tolerant.

Acacia debilis
A large shrub to small tree, reaching a maximum height of 20 feet, that is native to eastern Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 12 feet; largest on record - 20 feet.
The bipinnate leaves are composed of very narrow leaflets, up to 0.7 inches in length. The foliage is gray-green.
The tiny flower puffballs are golden-yellow.
The branches are reddish and the smooth bark is grayish-green.
Hardy zones 9b to 10 ( est )

Acacia decora ( Showy Wattle )
A dense, spreading shrub native to dry areas of eastern Australia.
Also called Western Golden Wattle. Some records include: 3 years - 5 feet; largest on record - 17 x 17 feet. Somewhat short-lived, trees exceeding 50 years in age are rare.
The slightly curved, narrow-elliptic leaves, up to 2.5 x 0.5 inches, are bright blue-green.
The very showy, globular, bright yellow flowers are borne in racemes during winter and spring.
The branches are reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 in sun to partial shade. Easy to grow.

Acacia decurrens ( Black Wattle )
A highly ornamental, very fast growing, large, erect tree native to New South Wales in Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 17 feet with a trunk diameter increase of 1 inch; 6 years - trunk diameter of 5 inches; 25 years - 60 feet; largest on record - 80 x 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet. Trees as large as 55 feet are known to grow in Ireland.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are deep green.
The linear leaflets are up to 0.6 inches in length.
The fragrant, globular, bright yellow flowers are borne in axilliary racemes, up to 6 inches in length, during late winter and early spring.
The dark gray bark is furrowed.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 ( unconfirmed reports of 7 ) thriving in areas with yearly rainfall exceeeding 18 inches. Very tolerant and easy to grow however may be prone to borers.

'mollis'
2 years - 9 feet.
Only marginally hardy in Tucson.

'subalpina'
11 years - 17 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 inches.
Has very silvery, tiny leaves.

Acacia difformis ( Wyalong Wattle )
A small tree, reaching a maximum height of 23 feet, that is native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 4 years - 7.5 feet.
The pendulous, narrow-oblanceolate leaves, up to 6.5 x 0.6 inches, are green.
The bright yellow flowers are borne on clusters, up to 2.5 inches in length.
Likely hardy north to zone 8b ( fully hardy to 15 F ), surviving in Tucson, AZ.

Acacia dunnii ( Dunn's Wattle )
A fast growing small tree native to far northwestern Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 21 feet; largest on record - 23 x 20 feet.
The large, falcate, glaucous-blue leaves are up to 18 x 12 ( rarely over 15 x 7 ) inches.
The very spectacular 0.8 inch golden-yellow flower balls are borne on panicles up to 20 inches in length, during most of the year.
Hardy in zone 11, tropics only.

Acacia elata ( Cedar Wattle )
A tree native to southeastern Australia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - ; 3 years - 25 feet; largest on record - 133 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The pinnate leaves are composed of lance-shaped leaflets, up to 2.5 x 0.5 inches.
The flowers are creamy-yellow.
The bark is blackish-gray.
Hardiness in North America is unknown, likely north to zone 8b.

Acacia enterocarpa ( Jumping Jack Wattle )
A dense, low spreading shrub reaching a maximum height of 5 feet that is native to border areas between South Australia and Victoria in Australia.
The linear leaves are up to 1.8 inches in length.
The bright yellow flowers are borne on globular heads.
Hardy zone 9 to 11 preferring sandy soil.

Acacia eremophila
A dense, rounded shrub, reaching a maximum height of 6.5 feet, that is native to southwestern Australia.
Some records include: 3 years - 4 feet.
The very linear leaves, up to 4.5 inches in length, are mid-green.
The golden-yellow flowerheads are borne from the leaf axils.
Hardy zones 9a to 10, preferring mediterranean or dry climates.

Acacia erioloba ( Camel Thorn )
Also called Acacia giraffae. It is a slow growing, shapely spreading evergreen tree that is a widespread native in southern Africa. Some records include: largest on record - 60 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet; longest lived - 300 years.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 18 F. It is a valuable shade tree in hot desert climates.
The leaves are bipinnate.
The sweetly fragrant, globular, golden-yellow flowers are borne singly during late winter and early spring.
They are followed by velvety gray coated, wide, sickle-shaped seed pods.
The stems are armed with white thorns.
The bark is rough and deeply fissured.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 18 F. Extremely drought tolerant due to its roots reaching as deep as 150 feet in search of water.

* photo of unknown internet source





Acacia erubescens
Attractive, thorny, medium-sized tree that is native to central and southern Africa.
Some records include: 1 year - 6 feet; 4 years - 10 feet; 10 years - 20 feet.
The leaves are bipinnate.
The bottlebrush flowers are white.
The showy bark is papery.

Acacia estrophiolata
A gracefully weeping Willow-like tree reaching a maximum size of 70 x 35 feet, that is native to inland areas of Australia.
The linear phyllode-leaves are up to 4.3 x 0.2 inches in size.
The pale yellow flowers are borne on globular heads, up to 0.2 inches across.
The bark is smooth and silver.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( tolerating 20 F ).

Acacia falcata ( Hickory Wattle )
A small tree reaching a maximum height of 40 ( rarely over 15 ) feet, that is native to southeastern Australia. Some records include: 1st year - 3 feet; 3 years - 15 feet.
The narrow-elliptical, falcate leaves, up to 7.5 x 1.6 inches, are blue-green.
The creamy-white flowers are borne on clusters, up to 2.5 inches in length.
Hardy zones 9 to 10

Acacia falciformis ( Pale Hickory Wattle )
A small tree reaching around 33 feet that is native to coastal southeast Australia.
Some records include: 5 years - 30 feet; largest on record - 82 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The pendulous phyllode leaves are up to 9 x 2.5 inches, are blue-green.
Small, very fragrant, yellow, ball-shaped flowers are borne in large clusters, up to 4 inches in length, during spring.
Hardy zone 9 to 10

Acacia farnesiana ( Sweet Acacia )
Also called Huisache. A fast growing, wiry, rounded to wide-spreading, small semi-evergreen to evergreen tree native to tropical America ranging north into Baja Peninsula, southern Arizona, central Texas, the Gulf Coast and south Florida. This is a most attractive tree when in full bloom. The outer twigs are pendulous adding to the beauty of this tree.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 2 years - 7 feet; 3 years - 14 x 12 feet; 10 years - 20 feet; largest on record - 40 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.5 feet. Long lived, the Sweet Acacia can persist over 100 years. It has spread into the wild outside its native range in parts of southern California, southern Arizona and central Texas to Louisiana and central Florida where it may become invasive on open to semi-open sites on sandy soils.
It makes a great hedge or screen in the desert southwest.
The feathery bipinnate leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are composed of 3 to 8 pairs of pinnae, each having 10 to 25 pairs of pointed, narrow oval leaflets, each up to 0.3 ( very rarely 0.5 inches ) inches in length. The foliage is bright-green.
The very attractive foliage is finely-textured.
The large, sweetly very fragrant, bright golden-yellow, globular flowers, up to an inch wide, are borne in small clusters in late winter and spring.
Oils obtained from the flowers can be used in the making of perfume.
They are followed by thick, shiny, reddish-purple to very dark brown, oblong pods, up to 3 x 2 inches.
The zig-zagged orange-brown twigs are armed with strong stiff, straight, whitish spines, up to 2 inches in length, that are borne in the leaf axils.
The bark is reddish-brown with abundant pale lenticels on young trees. Gray with long thin vertical strips on older trees.
Hardy zones 8 to 12 tolerating as low as 10 F ( however clones from the Caribbean and Florida are killed at or below 20 F ), thriving in climates with 12 + inches of yearly rainfall. Very salt, heat and drought tolerant. It is sold in pots in many Florida nurseries. It is easy to grow in just about any soil.
Pharmacology: Contains DMT & Tryptamine


* photo of unknown internet source



Acacia filicifolia ( Fern-Leaf Acacia )
A tree, reaching a maximum size of 60 ( rarely over 40 ) feet, that is native to southeastern Australia. Some records include: 11 years - 53 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 inches.
The deep green, fernlike leaves are composed of linear leaflets, up to 0.3 inches in length.
The smooth bark is dark brown.
Hardy zones 8b to 10, thrives and grows very rapidly in milder parts of England.

Acacia fimbriata ( Fringed Wattle )
Also called Brisbane Golden Wattle. A fast growing, bushy small tree that is native to eucalyptus forests of coastal areas in eastern Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; 3 years - 10 feet; largest on record - 25 x 20 feet. Fringed Wattle makes an excellent screen.
The linear phyllode leaves, up to 3 x 0.2 ( rarely over 2 ) inches, are deep green.
The profuse, sweetly fragrant, globular, bright yellow flowers are borne in dense clusters, up to 3 inches in length, during late winter and spring.
The slender branches are drooping.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 14 F in sun to partial shade.

Acacia fleckii
A multi-stemmed small tree, native to southern Africa that sometimes suckers to form inpenetrable thickets. Some records include: 11 years - 25 feet; largest on record - 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The foliage is gray-green.
The bottlebrush flower spikes, up to 2.6 inches in length, are creamy-white.
The creamy-white to pale gray bark is smooth or flaking on very old trees.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating 20 F ). Thrives in Yuma ( with irrigation ) but not Tucson. Thrives best in tropical climates but will tolerate occasional drought.

Acacia flexifolia ( Bent-Leaf Wattle )
A bushy, rounded to spreading shrub reaching up to 7 x 7 feet, that is native to inland parts of southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 3 years - 7 feet; largest on record -
The narrow phyllode leaves are up to 2 ( rarely over 0.8 ) inches in length.
The pale yellow, ball-shaped flowers are borne along the branches during winter and spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F. Thrives in sun to partial shade. Prune lightly after flowering.

Acacia floribunda ( Sally Wattle )
A fast growing, dense small tree with pendulous branches, that is native to coastal parts of eastern Australia. Some records include: 1 day - 1 inch; 5 years - 17 feet; largest on record - 47 x 50 feet. It is generally short lived, only living around 20 years.
The densely crowded, linear, phyllode leaves, up to 7 x 0.5 inches, are deep green.
The profuse, sweetly fragrant, pale yellow flowers are borne in loose spikes up to 3 inches in length during winter and early spring.
They are followed by seedpods up to 4 x 0.3 inches.
The smooth bark is gray with horizontal streaks and lighter mottles.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F, in sun to partial shade. Very adaptable and easy to grow.
Pharmacology: contains Tryptamine, phenethylamine

Acacia furcatispina
Some records include: 3 years - 8 feet; 5 years - 12 feet; 12 years - 18 feet.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( fully hardy to 18 F ). Thrives in Tucson

Acacia galpinii
A fast growing, massive, deciduous tree native to southern Africa similar in appearance to a mature Gleditsia - Honeylocust.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - ; 2 years - 18 feet; 3 years - 20 feet; 4 years - 25 feet; 9 years - 35 feet; 12 years - 40 feet; largest on record - 100 x 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 7 inches in length, are luxuriant bright green.
The long bottlebrush flowers are creamy-white.
Hardy zones 9a to 11 ( fully hardy to 16 F ), it thrives even in Yuma, AZ extreme heat.
The root system is extensive.

Acacia genistifolia ( Early Wattle )
An open shrub, reaching a maximum height of 10 feet, that is native to southeastern Australia.
The linear phyllode leaves are up to 1.6 inches in length.
The flower heads are creamy-yellow.
Hardy zones 9 to 10

Acacia gerrardii subsp 'negerensis'
Some records include: 3 years - 7 feet; 4 years - 10 feet; 8 years - 18 feet; 15 years - 22 feet; largest on record - 45 x 40 feet.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( fully hardy to 16 F ).

Acacia glaucoptera ( Clay Wattle )
A rapid growing, dome shaped shrub reaching a maximum size of 8 x 10 feet, that is native to southwestern Australia. Often reaching only 3 feet in height, it can be used for groundcover.
The overlapping, flat leaves, up to 3 x 1 wide, are deep purple at first turning to blue-green. In cool climates, the foliage turns purplish during winter.
The deep yellow flower-balls are borne on very short stalks along the stems during winter and spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F, thriving in full sun and partial shade. Heat and drought tolerant. It grows well as an understory plant under high canopy trees.
Pruning after flowering and pruning out dead wood encourages new growth.

Acacia gnidium
A dense, spreading shrub, reaching a maximum height of 13 feet, that is native to northeastern Australia.
Some records include: 2 years - 4 feet; 3 years - 6 feet.
The linear leaves are up to 2 inches in length.
Likely hardy north to zone 9, thriving in climates such as southern Arizona with occasional deep watering.

Acacia greggii ( Catclaw Acacia )
A small to medium size tree reaching up to 20 x 20 feet, that is a widespread native to the western U.S. from southern California & Nevada to Austin & Corpus Christi, Texas; south into the Baja Peninsula to eastern Mexico. It is deciduous and during dry years may remain dormant or leafless for most of the year.
Some records include: 2 years - 7 feet; 3 years - 10 x 3 feet; 8 years - 15 feet; 12 years - 17 feet; largest on record - 50 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 50 inches. Though the maximum longeavity is not known, this tree can certainly exceed 130 years of age on ideal sites. This tree is an excellent choice for a spiny inpenetrable hedge and land reclaimation.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are composed of 1 to 3 pairs of pinnae, each having 8, 10 or 12 oval leaflets, each up to 0.3 inches in length.
The entire leaf may have up to 40 leaflets. The foliage is gray-green.
The small, fragrant, bright creamy-yellow flowers are borne in dense oblong cylindrical spikes up to 2.5 inches in length.
They are followed by often curved, flattened pods, up to 5 x 0.8 inches. The pods usually constrict between the seeds. The pods often persist from midsumer through winter into the following spring. The pods are edible and can be eaten raw, however are better boiled with a change of water to reduce their bitterness.
The branches are armed with thick, sharply curved spines up to 0.3 inches in length.
The bark is brown and scaly. The heavy wood is hard and typically not used commercially. It is sometimes used for fence posts. The wood also makes good firewood as it burns hot.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 tolerating as low as -13 F in dry climates. This tree is not known to grow in the humid eastern U.S. Catclaw Acacia prefers a soil PH of 7 to 8.5 and is extremely drought tolerant though much faster growing with occasional deep irrigation.
The seeds may take years to germinate in the wild due to their hard shell.
The seeds will germinate much faster if soaked in water for 24 hours or soaked in acid before sowing. The Catclaw Acacia is also easy to reproduce from semi-ripe cuttings.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken by W.C. Barnes @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Acacia gummifera ( Morocco Acacia )
A small tree reaching a maximum height of 33 feet, that is native to north and central Africa.
Hardy north to zone 9, extremely drought tolerant.

Acacia haematoxylon
Some records include: 3 years - 3 feet; 7 years - 5 feet.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( fully hardy to 16 F ).

Acacia hakeoides ( Western Black Wattle )
A multi-branched, bushy, small tree native to drier regions of Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 6 feet; largest on record - 33 x 17 feet.
The thick, oblanceolate phyllode leavss, up to 6 x 0.5 inches, are green.
The showy, dense, bright yellow ball-shaped flowers are borne in axilliary racemes during winter and spring.
Hardy zone 8 to 10. Drought tolerant.

Acacia harpophylla ( Brigalow )
A fast growing, dense, erect, long lived small tree native to semi-arid parts of eastern Australia. Some records include: 5 years - 8 feet; largest on record - 82 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet. It often suckers to form thickets in the wild. An excellent shade and shelter tree in dry climates.
The curved, leathery, phyllode leaves, up to 8 x 1 inches, are silvery-gray.
The yellow ball-shaped flowers are borne in short racemes during late winter and spring.
The bark is dark and furrowed.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( fully hardy to 16 F ), it thrives in Tucson
The seeds are soft coated and do not need treatment to germinate readily.

Acacia harveyi
A dense, large shrub to small tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 feet, that is native to far southwestern Australia.
Some records include: 3 years - 5 feet; 6 years - 8 feet.
The linear leaves are up to 5 inches in length.
The lemon-yellow flowers are borne on globular heads.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( fully hardy to 16 F with foliage damage only ), preferring mediterranean type climates.

Acacia havilandii ( Needle Wattle )
A very attractive, bushy, broad vase-shaped shrub native to southeast Australia.
Some records include: 3 years - 6 x 10 feet; 5 years - 8 feet; largest on record - 13 x 17 feet. The bark is gray-brown.
The sharp pointed, slightly curved, fine, needle-like phyllode leaves are up to 3.2 ( rarely over 2 ) inches in length. The foliage is gray-green.
Masses of bright yellow ball-shaped flowers are borne in late winter and spring.
Hardy zone 9 to 11. Hardy in Tucson

Acacia hebeclada
Some records include: 1 year - 3 x 5 feet; 2 years - 4 x 8 feet; 3 years - 7 feet. Eventual height of 8 feet.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( tolerates 16 F with slight damage ).

Acacia hemsleyi
A small tree, reaching a maximum height of 23 feet, that is native to far northern Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 14 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 inches.
The narrow, oblanceolate leaves are up to 5 x 0.5 inches in size.
The rod-shaped flower spikes are up to 1.3 inches in length..
Only marginally hardy in Tucson.

Acacia heroensis
Some records include: 3 years - 6 feet.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating 16 F with slight damage ). Hardy in Tucson

Acacia holosericea
A rapid growing, thornless, spreading, small tree that typically only lives around 12 years.
Some records include: 1.5 years - 13 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 inches; 3.5 years - 16 feet; largest on record - 27 feet.
The narrow elliptical leaves are up to 10 x 4 ( rarely over 8 x 2 ) inches.
The foliage is luxuriant blue-green.
The rod-shaped flower spikes are golden-yellow.
Hardy zone 10 though may extend somewhat into zone 9, it is only marginally hardy in Tucson. Saline soil and flood tolerant.

Acacia howittii ( Howitt's Wattle )
A very fast growing, dense, rounded, gracefully weeping tree native to a resticted range in southeast Australia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6.6 feet; largest on record - 30 x 10 feet. It makes an excellent tall hedge plant.
The spicy fragrant, narrow elliptical phyllode leaves, up to 1 x 0.3 inches, are deep green.
The fragrant, lemon-yellow flower-balls are borne in masses during spring.
Hardy zone 9 to 10 tolerating as low as 19 F, thriving in full sun or partial shade.
It can tolerate heavy pruning.

Acacia implexa ( Hickory Acacia )
A fairly open, erect, long lived shade tree that is native to near coastal and coastal areas of eastern Australia.
Some records include: 3 years - 4.5 feet; largest on record - 53 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The curved phyllode leaves, up to 8 x 1 inches, are green.
The creamy-yellow flower-balls are borne in long racemes during summer and early autumn.
The bark is rough and grayish.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 in sun to partial shade.
Pharmacology: considered Psychoactive

* photo of unknown internet source


Acacia iteaphylla
A fast growing, bushy, spreading, large weeping shrub reaching a maximum size of 18 x 18 feet that is native to southern Australia.
The broad linear leaves, up to 5.5 x 0.3 ( rarely over 4 ) inches in length, are gray-green.
The fragrant, pale yellow flowers are borne in autumn and winter.
The bark is green on young plants.
Hardy zones 8 to 10. Drought tolerant.

Acacia jennerae
A moderate growing evergreen large shrub or small tree that is native to New South Wales in Australia.
Some records include: 2 years - 11 feet; 3 years - 14 feet; 5 years - 16 feet; largest on record - 20 x 12 feet.
The narrow-elliptical leaves, up to 4.5 x 1 inches, are silvery-blue.
The puffball flowers are golden-yellow.
The bark is reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( fully hardy to 15 F ) and thrives in Tucson.

Acacia karroo ( Karroo Thorn )
Also called Acacia horrida. A fast growing, rounded, spreading, medium-sized, deciduous tree that is a widespread native in southern Africa. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3.5 feet; 2 years - 8 feet; 3 years - 13 feet; 6 years - 16 feet; 7 years - 20 feet; 11 years - 25 feet; largest on record - 70 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet. The Karroo Thorn can live up to 300 years.
It is naturalized in southern Europe where it is grown as a screen.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 5 x 2 inches, are deep green.
The profuse, sweetly fragrant, deep yellow, ball-shaped flowers are borne at the branch tips during summer though sometimes into autumn.
The orange-red twigs are armed with paired white thorns, up to 2 inches in length.
The smooth bark is brownish-gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 11. Flood tolerant. Invasive roots may be a problem on restricted sites.
Pharmacology: Psychoactive

Acacia kempeana
A spreading large shrub to small tree, reaching a maximum height of 17 feet, that is native to central Australia. Some records include: 6 years - 10 feet.
The narrow elliptical leaves, up to 3.5 x 1 inches, are gray to blue-green.
The dense, golden-yellow flower spikes are up to an inch in length.
The bark is furrowed and brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( fully hardy to 16 F ), thriving in warmer parts of the U.S. desert southwest.

Acacia kettlewelliae
A bushy, small tree, reaching a maximum height of 33 feet, that is native to far southeast Australia.
The narrow, elliptical leaves, up to 4 x 0.3 inches, are blue-green to green.
The golden-yellow, puffball flowerheads are borne on clusters, up to 2.5 inches in length.
Hardy zones 8b to 10, is known to exceed 15 feet in the British Isles.

Acacia koa ( Koa )
A large, massive trunked, dense, bushy tree native to mountains of Hawaii that can reach over 100 feet and is a close relative of Acacia melanoxylon and Acacia confusa.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; 2 years - 17 feet; 5 years - 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; 20 years - 100 feet; largest on record - 140 x 150 feet with a trunk diameter of 11 feet.
The lance-shaped, phyllode leaves, up to 10 inches in length, are gray-green.
The pale yellow ball-shaped flowers are borne in axilliary clusters during spring.
Hardy zone 9 to 11. It's tough timber is valuable for the use in carving and the making of canoes.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken by R.E. Nelson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Acacia lanigera ( Woolly Wattle )
A rigid, rounded to spreading shrub native to far southeast Australia, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 10 feet.
The rigid, narrow-elliptic, phyllode leaves, up to 2.3 x 0.4 inches, are bright green.
The bright yellow flowers are borne in globular flowerheads borne from the leaf axils during late winter and early spring. They are followed by densely hairy, curled, brown pods.
The branches are covered in dense woolly hairs.
The bark is gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 and somewhat flood tolerant. Prune after flowering to encourage new growth and dense habit.

Acacia leiocalyx ( Curracabah )
An attractive small tree, reaching a maximum height of 33 feet, that is native to the central part of Australia's east coast. Some records include: 2 years - 9 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 inches; 3 years - 12 feet; 4 years - 18 feet.
The narrow-elliptical phyllode leaves, up to 7 x 1.4 inches, are blue-gray.
The very profuse, showy, pale-yellow flowers are borne on rod-shaped clusters.
The branches are reddish.
The flaky, fissured bark is gray-brown.
Hardy zones 9b to 10 ( tolerates 21 F with slight damage )

Acacia leucophloea
A large tree with attractive white-gray bark. Some records include: 5 years - 35 feet; largest on record - 120 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
It can live up to 100 years.
Tolerates temperatures anywhere from 30 to 122 F and is very drought tolerant.

Acacia leurderitzii
Some records include: 2 years - 14 feet; 5 years - 22 feet. Eventual size of 25 feet.
Hardy in Yuma.

Acacia ligulata ( Dune Wattle )
A dense, spreading shrub, reaching a maximum size of 13 x 13 feet, that is native to central and southern Australia.
The narrow-elliptical leaves, up to 3 x 0.5 inches, are deep green.
The deep golden-yellow, ball-shaped flowerheads, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne on short racemes that are borne from the leaf axils.
The branchlets are light brown.
Hardy zones 9 ( tolerating 15 F )

Acacia linifolia ( Flax Wattle )
A fast growing, graceful, open, airy, erect to pendulous slender shrub reaching up to 20 x 12 feet, that is native to woodland understories around Sydney, Australia.
The branching is slender and arching.
The crowded, linear phyllode leaves are up to 2 inches in length.
The yellow ball shaped flowers are borne 6 to 12 on slender axilliary racemes, up to 2 inches in length, during summer and fall though sometimes persisting into late winter.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 20 F

Acacia longifolia ( Sydney Golden Wattle )
A fast growing, short trunked, bushy, spreading small tree native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; 6 years - 27 feet; 20 years - 37 x 37 feet; largest on record - 37 x 82 feet; largest in Seattle - 26 feet.
It makes an excellent windbreak and screen.
The thick, straight, narrrow-elliptic, willow-like, leathery, phyllode leaves, up to 10 x 1.5 inches, are heavily longitudinally veined. The foliage is deep green.
The abundant bright yellow flower spikes are borne in erect racemes up to 3 inches in length all along the branches during winter and spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F; it grows in milder parts of Cornwall, England and there are unconfirmed reports of zone 8 hardiness. Tolerant of limey soils.
Pharmacology: plant contains 0.2% DMT

Acacia macradenia ( Zigzag Wattle )
A pendulous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 17 x 13 feet, that is native to northeastern Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 8.5 feet.
The long, narrow-oblong phyllode leaves are up to 10 x 1 inches in size.
The flower clusters, up to 2 inches in length, contain 8 to 15 flowers.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( estimate )
Pharmacology: Tryptamine

Acacia macrantha ( Steel Acacia )
A small tree to 25 feet that is very similar to the Twisted Acacia that is native to southern Florida and the Caribbean. Some records include: largest on record - 50 x 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The bipinnate foliage is luxuriant mid-green. The bright yellow flower balls are followed with pods up to 5.5 inches in length.
Hardy north to zone 9.

Acacia maidenii ( Maiden's Acacia )
A medium size tree reaching a maximum size of 66 x 18 ( rarely over 50 ) feet that is native to southeastern Australia. Long-lived, this tree can persist over 100 years.
Not a real massive tree, trunk diameters over 1 foot are extremely rare.
The narrow-elliptic phyllode leaves are up to 8 inches in length.
The creamy-yellow to bright yellow flowers are borne on rod-like spikes, up to 2.3 inches in length. The flower spikes are borne from the leaf axils.
The branches are light brown. The deep gray-brown bark is smooth on young trees, becoming deeply fissured on older plants.
Hardy north to zone 9 tolerating as low as 19 F. Flood tolerant.
Pharmacology; stem bark contains 0.6% NMT and DMT in 2:3 ratio. The foliage contains both.

Acacia mangium ( Black Wattle )
A large spreading tree, up to 120 feet; that native to coastal areas in far northern Queensland, Australia as well as southern New Guinea and the southern Molucca Islands. The Black Wattle makes an excellent shade tree. Some records include: 1st year - 10 feet; 3 years - 50 feet; 5 years - 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 inches; 14 years - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 16 inches; largest on record - 170 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The conspicuous veined, large, lance-shaped to elliptical leaves, up to 12 x 4 inches, are deep green.
The rod-like, creamy-white flowers, up to 5 inches in length, are borne in summer and fall. Twisted, woody pods in clusters follow.
The branches are stout.
The coarsely ridged and cracked bark is gray to dark brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 thriving where annual rainfall exceeds 40 inches.
Pharmacology: Psychoactive

* photo of unknown internet source


Acacia meansii ( Late Black Myrtle )
A large, upright, spreading tree native to forests of southeast Australia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 17 feet; 1 year - 17 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 inch; 2 years - 27 feet; 3 years - 35 feet; largest on record - 100 x 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
It makes for an excellent shade and shelter tree.
The ferny bipinnate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The profuse, light yellow, globular flowers are borne in loose clusters up to 6 inches in length during late spring to early summer.
The smooth gray to blackish bark becomes corrugated at the base on very old trees.
Hardy zones 7 to 11 thriving in climates with 18 inches of more of rainfall per year.
Drought tolerant.

Acacia melanoxylon ( Blackwood Acacia )
A, fast growing, tall, dense broad crowned evergreen tree, up to 150 feet, that is native to coastal eastern Australia and Tasmania. Some records include: 6 years - 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 inches; 20 years - 50 x 23 feet; 30 years - 66 feet ( average ); 40 years - 108 feet; largest on record - 200 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 feet; largest in England - 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet. With ideal conditions, it is a long lived tree, persisting well over 150 years.
Used as a street tree in California.
The heavily longitudinally-veined, long, curved, narrow, phyllode leaves, up to 7 x 1 inches, are deep green.
The profuse, light yellow, puffball flowers, up to 0.4 inches across, are borne in masses during late winter and early spring.
The strong, close-grained, dark timber is valuable for making cabinets.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 ( tolerating as low as 8 F ) in sun to partial shade on a sheltered site on fertile, moist soil. Thrives in parts of England. The Blackwood requires a yearly rainfall between 30 and 72 inches per year.
Tolerant of flooding, salt, wind, smog, heat and shade.
it hates drought and is very prone to borer attack in warm areas.
In South Africa it has escaped into the wild and become a weed.
Pharmacology: bark and leaf contains <0.02% DMT

Acacia mellifera
A rounded, small tree reaching up to 30 feet that is native to dry regions of Africa, Saudi Arabia & India. It often forms dense inpenetrable thickets in the wild.
Some records include: 2 years - 6 feet; 4 years - 10 feet; 11 years - 15 feet.
The leaves and stems are rich in protein and are great for feeding livestock in dry regions.
The fragrant, creamy-white flowers are borne on short, dense, hanging spikes.
The stems are armed with very sharp, recurved thorns.
The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( fully hardy to 16 F ). Hardy in Tucson. Thrives where rainfall averages 16 to 32 inches and is clay tolerant.
Pharmacology; leaf contains DMT.

Acacia milleifolia ( Santa Rita Acacia )
A very attractive, medium-sized shrub.
Some records include: 2 years - 5 feet; eventually up to 8 feet.
The pinnate leaves are composed of linear leaflets. The foliage is luxuriant mid-green.
The white flowers are borne on showy, rod-like clusters.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating 16 F with slight damage ). Hardy in Tucson.

Acacia melvillei ( Yarran )
A very rare Acacia that is native to southeastern Australia. It is a large shrub to small tree, reaching a maximum size of 50 x 38 feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches. It is long-lived and trees can persist as long as 150 years.
Acacia omalophylla is nearly identical but occurs at higher elevations in the same region of Australia.
The narrow willow-like leaves, up to 4.3 x 1 inches, are mid-green.
The showy flowers are yellow.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 in full sun. Drought and lime tolerant.

Acacia modesta
A fast growing, medium-sized, deciduous tree, that is native to western Pakistan, Afghanistan and India. Some records include: 2 years - 9 feet; 3 years - 15 feet; 10 years - 22 feet.
The double pinnate leaves are up to 2 inches in length.
The stems are armed with deep brown thorns, up to 0.25 inches in length.
The bark is greenish-gray on young trees, later turning rough and brownish.
The wood is hard and durable.
Hardy zones 9 to 10. Thrives in Tucson

Acacia mollifera ( Velvet Acacia )
A multi-stemmed, pendulous, small to medium size, evergreen tree native to Australia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 40 feet.
The double-pinnate leaves, up to 2.5 inches in length, are silvery-gray.
Up to 42 golden-yellow puffball flowers may be borne in a cluster.
The stems are densely tomentose.
The brown to grayish-black bark is smooth except for becoming fissured near the base on older trees.

Acacia montana ( Mallee Wattle )
A multi-stemmed, large shrub, reaching a maximum size of 13 x 20 feet, that is native to southeastern Australia. Some records include: 6 years - 5.5 feet.
The narrow oblong leaves are up to 1.6 x 0.3 inches in size.
The golden-yellow puffball flowers, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne from the leaf axils.
The stems are either sparsely thorned or have no thorns at all.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( fully hardy to 16 F ). Hardy in Tucson

Acacia montigena
A vining rainforest Acacia, reaching a maximum height of 100 feet, that is a widespread native to Africa.
The double-pinnate leaflets are composed of linear leaflets.
The young branched are dark brown to black.
Hardy zones 10 to 12

Acacia mosambique
Some records include: largest on record - 100 x 85 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.

Acacia mucronata
Similar to Acacia longifolia but is slightly hardier and with very narrow phyllode leaves up to 8 x 0.3 inches. It is taller growing but more narrow in habit, reaching a maximum height of 50 feet.
It is native to southeastern Australia including Tasmania.

Acacia muelleriana ( Mueller's Wattle )
An attractive,bushy, multi-stemmed, spreading small tree native to eucalyptus forests in Queensland & New South Wales in Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 13 feet; largest on record - 27 x 20 feet.
The double-pinnate leaves are deep green. The leaflets are linear, up to 1.5 inches in length.
The creamy-yellow flowers are borne in heads during spring and summer.
They are followed by narrow seed pods up to 6 inches in length.
The smooth bark is yellow-brown to gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 11

Acacia murrayana ( Murray's Wattle )
A fast growing, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 27 x 27 feet with a trunk diameter up to 8 inches. It is native to central Australia where it often forms suckering colonies in the wild. Some records include: 3 years - 5 feet.
The oblanceolate leaves, up to 7 x 0.5 inches, are bright green to blue-green.
The showy, golden-yellow flowerballs are borne on clusters up to 2.5 inches in length.
Hardy zones 9b to 11 in dry climates.

Acacia myrtifolia ( Myrtle Wattle )
A fast growing, bushy, low to medium size shrub reaching a maximum size of 10 x 10 feet that is native to southern Australia.
The erect, lance-shaped to narrow-elliptic, phyllode leaves, up to 6 x 1.3 inches, are reddish at first, turning to deep green.
The fluffy, creamy-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.5 inches across, are borne in short racemes, up to 4.5 inches, over a long season during winter and spring.
The stems are red. The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 in full sun to partial shade. Prune lightly after flowering to promote new growth.

* photo of unknown internet source



Acacia nebrownii ( Water Acacia )
A moderate growing, dense, semi-evergreen large shrub to small tree reaching a maximum size of 23 x 20 ( rarely over 17 ) feet, that is native to dry parts of southern Africa.
Some records include: 2 years - 8 feet; 3 years - 12 feet; 5 years - 14 feet.
The double-pinnate leaves, up to 1.3 x 0.8 inches, are green.
The showy flowers are golden-yellow.
The yellow to orangish stems are armed with white thorns, up to 2.3 inches in length.
The bark is smooth and reddish.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( tolerating as low as 18 F ) in full sun. It will freeze to the base at 16 F but will regrow rapidly the following spring.
It is tolerant of both flooding and temporary drought.

Acacia neovernicosa ( Varnish Acacia )
Also called Chihuahuan Whitethorn. An upright shrub, reaching a maximum size of 13 x 8 feet, that is native from Arizona and southern New Mexico into Mexico. Some records include: 2 years - 7 feet; 4 years - 10 feet; 7 years - 13 feet.
The leaves are double-pinnate.
The puffball flowers are bright yellow.
Hardy zones 7a to 11 in full sun. Tolerant of severe drought and alkaline soil.

Acacia neriifolia ( Oleander Wattle )
A fast growing, open, erect, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 50 x 30 ( rarely over 30 ) feet, that is native to eastern Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 7 feet.
The linear to narrow-elliptic, willowy, phyllode leaves, up to 8.5 ( rarely over 6 ) inches in length, are downy white at first turning to blue-green.
The abundant, showy, golden-yellow flower puffballs, up to 0.3 inches, are borne on long narrow axilliary racemes up to 4 inches in length during late spring into early summer.
The gray bark becomes fissured on older trunks.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 in full sun on well drained soil. It prefers a climate with 20 to 28 inches of average yearly rainfall. The seeds require 1 minute immersion in boiling water to break dormancy.

Acacia nigrescens
A shapely, rounded, large tree, that is native to Africa. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet with a trunk diameter increase of 1.3 inches; largest on record - 80 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
Long lived, this tree can exceed 300 years in age.
It makes an excellent shade tree where it is adapted.
The bipinnate leaves are composed of leaflets up to an inch in length.
The very showy, creamy-white flower spikes are borne before the new foliage emerges.
The bark is dark brown to black. The trunk is characteristically covered in thorn tipped knobs.
Hardy zones 9a to 11 in full sun on well drained soil It can thrives where average rainfall is anywhere between 15 and 90 inches in a year though preferring a dry season. Drought tolerant.

Acacia nilotica ( Egyptian Acacia )
A rapid growing, dense, rounded, large tree native to drier parts of tropical Africa as well as from Saudi Arabia to India. Some records include: 1 year - 6 feet; 2 years - 12 feet; 3 years - 18 feet; 4 years - 23 feet; 6 years - 25 feet; 10 years - 30 feet; largest on record - 82 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet. It should not be planted in Australia where it can spread into the wild and become an invasive weed. A very attractive landscape tree resembling the Honey Locust in appearance.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 6 ( rarely over 3 ) inches in length, are composed of 0.3 inch leaflets. The deep green foliage can either be deciduous or evergreen depending upon moisture conditions.
The flower puffballs are golden-yellow.
The stems are armed with paired, straight spines up to 3 inches in length.
The deeply fissured bark is dark brown.
Hardy north to zone 9b tolerating as low as 26 F and as well as hot as 120 F. It is both tolerant of flooding, saline soil and also drought, surviving in climates with as low as 14 inches of rainfall per year. It is recommended to direct seed it into its permanent position since transplanting is difficult due to its deep taproot.
Pharmacology: leaf contains DMT

* photo of unknown internet source


Acacia notabilis ( Notable Wattle )
Also called Flinder's Wattle. A moderate growing, bushy, spreeading shrub, reaching a maximum height of 17 feet, that is native to southeastern Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 5 feet.
The oblanceolate leaves, up to 5 x 1 inches, are blue-green.
The bright yellow flower puffballs, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne on clusters up to 2.5 inches in length.
The twigs are deep reddish-brown. The bark is smooth and red to gray-brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( fully hardy to 17 F )

Acacia obtecta
A very attractive, slow growing, bushy, rounded shrub,, reaching a maximum size of 13 x 13 feet, that is native to southwestern Australia. Some records include: 8 years - 6 feet; 11 years - 7.5 feet. It is great for soil stabilization where it is adapted.
The linear to oblanceolate leaves, up to 4.5 x 0.3 inches, are dull green.
The showy, bright yellow, flower puffballs, up to 0.4 inches, are borne 2 to 4 on axilliary clusters.
The bark is smooth and pale gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( foliage damage only at 16 F ) on sand or clay, preferring a Mediterranean climate.
To propagate, boil the seed for 5 minutes to break dormancy.

Acacia occidentalis ( Sonoran Catclaw )
A thorny deciduous tree native to the Sonoran Desert in Mexico that is basically a larger version of Acacia greggii reaching a maximum size of 40 x 40 feet.
Some records include: 2 years - 6 feet; 5 years - 10 feet; 10 years - 20 feet.
The deciduous, compound foliage is gray-green. It casts dense shade.
The creamy ball shaped flowers are borne during spring.
The twisted branches are covered in sharp spines.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( fully hardy to 15 F ). Extremely heat and drought tolerant.
Very hardy in Tucson

Acacia odoratissima ( Black Siris )
Correctly called Albizzia odoratissima. Some records include: 2 years - 10 feet; 5 years - 17 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 inches; largest on record - 133 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are composed of leaflets up to 1.5 x 0.5 inches in size. The foliage is deep green.
The fragrant, creamy-white flowers are borne 10 to 12 on terminal panicles up to 8 inches in length.

Acacia oxycedrus ( Spike Wattle )
A stiff prickly large shrub or small tree reaching a maximum size of 33 x 7 feet, that is native to far southeastern Australia.
The sharp pointed, flat, rigid, lance-shaped phyllode leaves, up to 1.6 x 0.2 inches , are whorled around the stens.
The very showy, dense, light yellow flower spikes, up to 2 inches in length, appear during winter and spring.
The stems are prickly making this an excellent barrier hedge.
The gray-brown bark is smooth, becoming lightly fissured on older plants.
Hardy zones 8 to 10

Acacia pachyacra ( Casuarina Acacia )
A bushy shrub, reaching a maximum size of 17 feet, that is native to desert areas of west central Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 6.5 feet; 3 years - 9 feet; 4 years - 12 feet. It resembled the Casuarina in appearance.
The very linear leaves, up to 8 x 0.04 inches, are bright green to gray-green.
The tiny, golden-yellow flowerballs are borne on clusters, up to 1.3 inches in length.
The branches are reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 10 to 11 ( est )

Acacia papyrocarpa ( Western Myall )
A slow growing, very dense, rounded to spreading, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 33 feet, that is native to southwestern and south central Australia.
Some records include: 3 years - 7 feet; longest lived - 1000 years.
The very linear leaves, up to 5 x 0.1 inches, are silvery.
The golden-yellow flowerballs are borne on clusters up to 2.5 inches in length.
The bark is gray and fissured.
Hardy zones 9 to 10, ( fully hardy to 16 F ). Very drought tolerant.

Acacia paradoxa ( Kangaroo Thorn )
Also called Acacia armata. A very ornamental, dense, , twiggy, spiny, large shrub to small tree reaching a maximum size of 25 x 25 ( rarely over 17 x 13 ) feet that is a widespread native to southeastern Australia as well as Australia's extreme southwest. It makes an excellent barrier hedge. It should not be planted in California where it may become an invasive noxious weed.
The wavy edged, narrow-oblong phyllode leaves, up to 1.6 x 0.3 inches, are deep green.
The profuse large, golden-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.5 inches, are borne singly or paired along the stems during late winter and spring.
The stems are armed with needle-like spines.
The finely fissured bark is gray-brown.
Hardy zones 8 to 11, tolerant of extended drought.
It can be pruned lightly one a year to shape.

* photo of unknown internet source


Acacia pataczekii ( Pataczek's Acacia )
A vigorous, handsome, suckering, small tree, that is native to Tasmania. Some records include: 30 years - 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 inches.
The narrow-oblong leaves, up to 2.4 x 0.8 inches, are blue-green.
The bright yellow flowerballs are borne on clusters up to 4 inches in length.
The branchlets are dark reddish.
Thrives in milder parts of England.

Acacia patagiata
A rounded to spreading shrub, reaching a maximum size of 8 feet, that is native to far southestern Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 3 x 6 feet; 6 years - 6 feet.
The erect, narrow-oblong phyllode leaves, up to 2.2 x 0.3 inches, are luxuriant blue-green.
The showy, bright yellow flowerballs, up to 0.2 inches across, are borne from the leaf axils.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( hardy with foliage damage only 16 F ) in full sun thriving on well drained sand or clay. Prefers a mediterranean climate.

Acacia pendula ( Weeping Myall )
A stunning, slow growing, dense, gracefully weeping tree that is a widespread native to dry regions of eastern Australia.
Some records include: 3 years - 6 feet; largest on record - 48 x 44 feet with a trunk diameter of 25 inches. Long lived, it makes an excellent street tree or windbreak.
The narrow-elliptic phyllode leaves, up to 5.5 x 0.5 inches, are silvery or bluish.
The small, light yellow flowerballs, up to 0.2 inches, are borne 2 to 7 on axilliary racemes, up to 0.6 inches in length. The flowers are borne randomly throughout the year and are not very showy.
The fissured bark is gray or dark brown.
The close grained timber is hard and aromatic.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 15 F, thriving in climates with 18 + inches of rainfall per year.
Thrives on well drained soil with infrequent deep watering.
Tolerant of salty soil, drought, temporary flooding and clay. Deer resistant.

Acacia pennatula
A fast growing, dense, very tropical looking tree reaching a maximum size of 50 x 50 feet, that is native to Mexico. Some records include: 2 years - 7 feet; 4 years - 12 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 inches; 5 years - 14 feet; 7 years - 20 feet.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 7 x 1.5 inches, have large feathery pinnae.
The foliage is mid-green.
The bright yellow flower puffballs are borne during spring.
The stems are armed with small paired thorns from the leaf axils.
The fissured bark is brownish-gray.
Hardy zones 10 to 11 in full sun on well drained soil.
Tolerates extreme and reflected heat, even in Yuma, Arizona.
Pharmacology: may contain anticancerous properties.

Acacia penninervis
An erect to spreading, small tree, reaching a maximum height of 27 feet, that is native to the central part of Australia's east coast.
The narrow-elliptic leaves, up to 6.5 x 1.6 inches, are green to blue-green.
The creamy-white flowerballs, up to 0.4 inches across, are borne 15 to 30 on clusters up to 5 inches in length.
The finely to deeply fissured bark is dark gray.
Hardy zones 10 ( est )

Acacia permixta ( Hairy Acacia )
A shrub that is native to southern Africa. Some records include: 3 years - 7 feet.
The bipinnate leaves are similar to that of the Honeylocust in appearance.
The flower puffballs are bright yellow.
The stems are armed with sharp white thorns.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( slight damage only at 16 F )

Acacia peuce
A pendulous, medium size tree, reaching a maximum size of 50 x 40 feet, that is native to the Simpson Desert in central Australia.
The extremely narrow leaves are up to 16 x 0.04 ( rarely over 6 ) inches. The foliage is similar in appearance to that of the Casuarina.
The wood is extremely hard.
Hardy zones 8a to 10. Has extreme tolerance of both heat and drought and can survive in climates with as little as 5 to 8 inches of yearly rainfall.

Acacia podalyriifolia ( Pearl Acacia )
A very fast growing, highly ornamental, evergreen, slender to spreading, small tree reaching a maximum size of 27 x 27 feet that is native to coastal regions of southern Queensland Australia.
it is typically short lived due to disease and borers.
It is popular as a landscape/street tree for its attractive, silvery, oblong or elliptic, phyllode leaves, up to 2 x 1 inches.
The abundant, very fragrant, golden-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.3 inches, are borne 15 to 30 on dense clusters up to 6 inches in length from early winter into spring.
The stems are downy at first, later turning silvery-gray and smooth. Older trees develop a very attractive blue-green trunk that is finely fissured.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F and average yearly rainfall as low as 18 inches. Very clay tolerant. Can be pruned hard after flowering.
Pharmacology: fresh bark contains 0.5% to 2% DMT.

Acacia polyacantha ( White Thorn )
A fast growing, layered and flat crowned, semi-deciduous, large tree native to central Africa. Some records include: 1 year - 10 feet; 2 years - 16 feet; 3 years - 20 feet; 5 years - 28 feet; 10 years - 30 feet; largest on record - 82 x 60 feet.
The ferny bipinnate leaves are composed of 11 to 27 pairs of pinnae. The foliage
is luxuriant mid-green.
The narrow, long flower-spikes are creamy-white.
The stems are armed with hooked thorns that often persist on older stems.
The bark is yellow-brown.
Hardy north to zone 9a
Pharmacology: leaf contains DMT

Acacia pravissima ( Ovens Wattle )
An extremely fast growing, pendulous, spreading, small evergreen tree native to hill country of southeast Australia.
Some records include: 2 years - 4 feet; 4 years - 6 feet; 20 years - 30 feet; largest on record - 42 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The spine-tipped, triangular, phyllode leaves, up to 0.8 x 0.6 inches, are gray to olive green.
The profuse, golden-yellow, ball-shaped flowers are borne in long racemes up to 4 inches in length during late winter to early spring.
The gray bark is smooth becoming finely-fissured on older trees.
Hardy zone 8 to 10 ( tolerating as low as 8 F ) in full sun ( tolerates partial shade ) on humus-rich, well drained soil on a site protected from excessive wind. Thrives on the west coast north to Seattle as well as in England as long as it is planted on a warm sheltered site.
Ovens Wattle prefers consistent moisture but can tolerate the occasional drought. Deer resistant. Prune after flowering.

* photos taken on Aug 15 2014 @ Rawlings Conservatory, Baltimore, MD


'Golden Carpet'
A groundcover form that is low growing, reaching a maximum size of 16 inches x 20 feet.
The tringular leaves are up to 0.4 x 0.3 inches. The profuse yellow flowerballs are up to 0.2 inches across.

Acacia prominens ( Gossford Wattle )
An attractive, dense, long lived tree reaching a maximum size of 82 x 45 feet, that is native to a very tiny area near Gossford in southeastern Australia.
It makes a spectacular lawn tree.
The narrow-oblong, blue-green, phyllode leaves are up to 2.5 x 0.5 inches, are blue-green.
The profuse, showy, sweetly fragrant, light yellow flowerballs, up to 0.2 inches, are borne in dense clusters, up to 2.3 inches in length, during late winter and early spring.
The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F. Prefers a shaded sheltered position and moist soil.

Acacia pruinocarpa ( Black Gidge )
A fast growing, thornless, small evergreen tree reaching a maximum size of 40 x 30 feet that is native to central and western ( not southwestern ) Australia.
The linear to narrow-elliptic, thick, leathery leaves, up to 7 x 1.3 inches, are gray-green.
The bright yellow flowerballs, up to 0.3 inches, are borne on racemes up to 6 inches in length, during spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating 18 F but defoliates at 22 f ).

Acacia pruinosa ( Frosty Acacia )
A medium size tree native to southeast Australia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 25 years - 50 feet; largest on record - 60 x 40 feet.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 4 inches in length, have pinnae in 5 pairs. The narrow oblong leaflets are up to 0.7 x 0.25 inches. The foliage is bronze at first, turning to blue-green.
The golden-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.4 inches across, are borne on racemes up to 6 inches in length.
The branches are glossy and reddish. The bark is smooth and reddish-purple.
Hardy north to zone 9

Acacia pubescens ( Downy Wattle )
A showy, fast growing, pendulous branched, spreading shrub native to coastal South Wales, Australia where it is endangered due to habitat destruction in its tiny natural range around Sydney. Some records include: 3 years - 8 feet; largest on record - 20 x 10 feet.
The deciduous, bipinnate leaves, up to 3 x 2 inches, are composed of leaflets, up to 0.2 inches in length. The foliage is silvery at first, turning to bright green.
The profuse bright yellow flowerballs, up to 0.25 inches, are borne 8 to 16 on dense drooping sprays, up to 4.3 inches in length, during late winter and spring.
The branches are soft, downy and dark reddish-brown. The bark is smooth and brownish-gray.
Hardy zone 9 to 11

Acacia pulchella ( Prickly Moses )
A spiny, broad spreading, semi-evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 5 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, that is native to southwestern Australia.
The bipinnate leaves are divided into up to 11 pairs of tiny, narrow oblong leaflets, up to 0.25 inches. The foliage is luxuriant mid-green.
The tiny, deep yellow flowers are borne in dense, rounded heads during spring.
The stems are armed with 1 to 2 axilliary spines, up to 0.8 inches in length, per node.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 in full sun on fertile, sandy soil. It prefers a mediterranean climate.

Acacia pustula
A small tree closely related to Acacia nerifolia that is native to semi-dry regions of southern Queensland in Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 50 feet.
The drooping, linear phyllode leaves are up to 6 x 0.5 inches.
The main ornamental feature is the masses of late winter light golden-yellow flowers.
The stems are dark reddish.
Hardy zones 9 to 11

Acacia pycnantha ( Golden Wattle )
A fast growing, open branched, pendulous tree native to Eucalyptus forest on sandy soils in southern temperate regions of Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 13 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 inches; 4 years - 15 x 7 feet; 25 years - 35 feet; largest on record - 76 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet. It can sucker freely from the base. Golden Wattle is the floral emblem of Australia. It has also escaped into the wild and become a weed in South Africa. It is not a long lived tree, lasting an average of 30 years.
The pendulous, thick, leathery, oblanceolate phyllode leaves, up to 8 x 1.5 inches, are glossy rich green.
The profuse, sweetly fragrant, large, golden-yellow, ball-shaped flowers, up to 0.4 inches, are borne in long racemes up to 12 inches in length during late winter and spring.
They are followed by seed pods up to 4.7 inches in length.
The brown bark is smooth becoming finely fissured on older trees.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 thriving in climates with 14 to 40 inches of rainfall per year.
It prefers hot summers with low humidity. Young trees are not as frost hardy as older more established trees.

Acacia pyrifolia ( Kanji Bush )
A shrub, reaching a maximum size of 15 ( rarely over 10 ) feet, that is native to northwestern Australia.
The round leaves, up to 2.3 x 1.6 inches, are blue-gray.
The yellow flowerballs are borne on clusters up to 7 inches in length.
The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy zones 10 to 11 ( severe dieback at 21 F but resprouts vigorously ) in semi-arid climates.

Acacia redolens ( Prostrate Acacia )
An attractive, very fast growing, wide spreading, evergreen shrub that can be used for groundcover. It is native to far southwestern Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 2.5 x 8 feet; 7 years - 4 x 10 feet; largest on record - 6 x 28 ( rarely over 5 x 12 ) feet.
The lance-shape to spathulate, gray to mid-green leaves are up to 3 x 0.5 inches.
The bright yellow flowerballs are up to 0.2 inches across.
Hardy zones 8a+ in full sun preferring a mediterranean climate. Tolerates drought and ocean salt winds.

'Desert Carpet'
A low groundcover form, reaching up to 2 x 15 feet.

Acacia rehmanniana ( Silky Acacia )
A low, dome shaped to flat crowned tree native to southeastern Africa that can reach a maximum height of 30 feet.
The downy bipinnate leaves are bright golden-green at first, later turning to deep green. The foliage is deciduous during drought.
The sweetly fragrant, white, ball shaped flowers are borne in small clusters during summer.
The orangish-brown stems are armed with straight paired thorns.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( diesback to base at 20 F but resprouts vigorously ). Very drought tolerant.

Acacia retinodes ( Swamp Wattle )
A semi-pendulous, rounded small tree, that is native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; first year - 5 feet; largest on record - 36 x 36 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
It is generally short-lived, lasting around 40 years.
The narrow, oblanceolate leaves, up to 8 x 0.6 inches, are blue-green to green.
The creamy-yellow flowerballs are borne on clusters up to 1.6 inches in length.
The bark is smooth and gray on young trees, on older trees becoming rough and blackish-brown.
Hardy north to zone 8b tolerating as low as 15 F. Thrives in England.^

Acacia rhetinocarpa
A spreading, dome-shaped, resinous, attractive shrub reaching a maximum height of 6.6 feet that is native to south central Australia where it is endangered.
The thick, curved, resinous, obovate phyllode leaves, up to 0.2 x 0.14 inches, are blue-green.
The profuse, bright-yellow, ball-shape flowers are borne singly in the leaf axils during late winter and spring.
Hardy zone 8 to 10. Tolerant of alkaline soil.

Acacia riceana ( Rice's Wattle )
A pendulous small tree that is native to Tasmania. Some records include: 20 years - 27 x 20 feet; 23 years - 37 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; largest on record - 37 x 30 feet
The rigid, pointed, linear to narrow-oblanceolate phyllode leaves, up to 2.2 x 0.1 inches, are deep green.
The creamy-white, ball-shaped flowers are borne in drooping spikes up to 1.5 inches in length.
Hardy north to zone 8 tolerating as low as 5 F. Heavy shade tolerant.

Acacia rigens ( Needle Wattle )
Also called Acacia chordophylla & Acacia loderi. A fast growing, dense, rounded shrub to small tree, rarely exceeding 20 feet, that is widely native to dry regions of southern Australia. Some records include: largest on record - 32 x 23 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot. It is long lived and can survive as long as 100 years.
The sharp pointed, stiff, narrow phyllode leaves are up to 5.5 x 0.1 inches, is similar to that of the Casuarina in appearance. The foliage is gray-green.
The profuse, golden flowerballs, up to 0.3 inches, are borne in small clusters during winter and spring.
The dark gray bark is finely fissured.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 in sun to partial shade. An excellent ornamental plant for arid and semi-arid climates.

Acacia rigidula ( Blackbrush Acacia )
An extremely thorny, moderate growing, small tree native to south Texan and northern Mexican Chihuahuan desert. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 4 years - 6 feet; 7 years - 9 feet; largest on record - 27 x 31 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot. An excellent lawn tree.
The foliage is deep green.
The stems are extremely thorny.
The attractive bark is pale gray.
Hardy north to zone 8 tolerating as low as 15 F. Requires full sun and is heat and very drought tolerant.
Pharmacology: contains Mescaline & DMT


* photo of unknown internet source



Acacia rivularis
A bushy rounded shrub, reaching a maximum height of 17 feet, that is native to south central Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 8 feet; 4 years - 13 feet; 8 years - 16 feet. It is generally short-lived, lasting around 20 years.
The linear leaves, up to 5.5 x 0.2 inches, are mid-green.
The bright yellow flowerballs, up to 0.2 inches, are borne on clusters up to 1.6 inches in length.
The bark is gray and finely fissured.
Hardy zones 9b to 11 ( est ) in semi-arid climates.

Acacia robusta 'Ussumb'
A large tree with a massive deeply ridged trunk. Some records include: largest on record - 75 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The leaves are up to 5 inches in length.
The spines are up to 4 inches or more in length.
Hardy north to zone 9b

Acacia roemeriana
A small evergreen tree native to Texas.
Some records include: 2 years - 6 feet; 7 years - 13 feet; largest on record - 25 x 25 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.6 feet.
The very fragrant flowers are white.
Hardy north to zone 7, it is fully hardy at Tucson.
Requires a deep well drained soil and is very heat tolerant as well as drought tolerant. It is not known to grow in the humid eastern U.S.

Acacia rostellifera
A fast growing, dense, spreading tree reaching a maximum size of 40 x 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet, that is native to southwestern Australia.
The narrow, oblanceolate leaves, up to 4.5 x 0.7 inches, are green to blue-green.
The golden-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne on clusters, up to 1.3 inches in length.
The bark is fissured and dark gray.
Tolerates as low as 20 F, prererring a mediterranean climate. Thrives in Phoenix, Arizona.

Acacia rubida ( Red-Stemmed Wattle )
A fast growing, small bushy tree native to much of southeastern Australia. Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; largest on record - 45 x 20 feet.
The leathery, narrow, oblanceolate to narrow-elliptic phyllode leaves, up to 8 x 1 inches, are medium green during summer turning reddish during winter.
The profuse, bright yellow flowerballs, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne 10 to 20 on clusters up to 4 inches in length. The flowers are borne during late winter and spring.
The angular stems are deep red. The finely fissured bark is brown.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 tolerating as low as 8 F. Prefers full sun to partial shade and is flood tolerant as well as tolerant of drought.

Acacia salicina ( Broughton Willow )
A medium size, evergreen tree native to tropical central and eastern Australia that is similar in habit to the Weeping Willow.
Some records include: 2 years - 10 feet; 4 years - 16 feet; 5 years - 20 feet; 10 years - 20 feet; largest on record - 90 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
It is long-lived, lasting for over 50 years in age.
It is a handsome foliage plant with narrow elliptical, blue-green leaves up to 8 x 1.3 inches.
The pale-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne in clusters up to 2.5 inches in length.
The branchlets are dark gray-brown.
The bark is fissured and gray-brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( fully hardy to 16 F though foliage is damaged at 18 F ) on deep well drained soil in climates with 15+ inches of yearly rainfall. It is tolerant of flooding, saline soils and pure sand making it an excellent choice for rehabilitating sand dunes but is also good on clay. On dry, sandy soils, the roots can reach up to 50 feet or more in depth, on wet poorly drained soils this tree will be much more shallow roots and also much more prone to uprooting in high winds.

Acacia saligna ( Blueleaf Acacia )
Also called Acacia cyanophylla or Orange Wattle. It is a fast growing, dense, bushy, pendulous small tree native to far southwestern Australia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 1 year - 7 feet; 2 years - 14 x 7 feet; 3.5 years - 21 feet; 4 years - 27 x 27 feet; largest on record - 33 x 33 feet. It has invasive potential in some climates and has become a weed in South Africa.
It typically only lives about 20 years.
The drooping, gray-green, lance-shaped phyllode leaves are up to 12 x 3 inches.
The profuse, large, fluffy, yellow flowerballs, up to 0.5 inches, are borne in racemes up to 3 inches in length during late winter and early spring.
The brownish-gray bark is smooth becoming finely fissured on older trees.
Hardy zones 9 to 11. Minor leaf burn at 19 F, stem damaged at 15 F. Drought tolerant, growing in regions with 8 to 40 inches of rainfall per year, making a great windbreak for northern Africa and the Middle East.
Prefers mediterranean winter rainfall climates.

Acacia schaffneri ( Twisted Acacia )
An attractive, moderate growing, twisted, deciduous to evergreen, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 25 x 30 feet, that is native to the southwest U.S. ( southeastern New Mexico & Texas ), south to Oaxaca Mexico.
Some records include: 2 years - 8 feet; 4 years - 11 feet; 7 years - 14 feet; largest trunk diameter - 8 inches.
The finely-divided, ferny, bipinnate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are gray-green.
The very fragrant, bright yellow flowerballs are up to 0.4 inches across.
The stems are viciously armed with long, 1 inch, paired, white thorns that originate from the leaf axils.
The bark is grayish-brown.
Hardy zones 8b to 10 ( fully hardy at 15 F ) in full sun on well drained soil.
It makes a great landscape tree in Arizona as well as in its native range.
Pharmacology: Contains mescaline & Amphetamine

Acacia schottii
A deciduous small shrub, reaching a maximum size of 6 x 5 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, that is native to Texas and Chihuahua Mexico. Some records include: 3 years - 4 feet; 7 years - 6 feet.
The lacy bipinnate leaves are composed of linear leaflets. The foliage is bright green.
The showy, golden-yellow flowerballs are borne spring through summer.
The stems are armed with white spines up to 0.7 inches in length.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 ( tolerating 10 F ) in full sun on well drained soil.
Very tolerant of heat, drought, clay soil and lime.

Acacia sclerosperma ( Limestone Wattle )
A dense, rounded, shrub or small tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 13 feet, that is native to western Australia. Some records include: 4 years - 9 feet.
The thick, linear to narrow-elliptic leaves, up to 5.5 x 0.7 inches, are blue-green.
The flowers are yellow.
The bark on the stems and branches is smooth and light gray.
Hardy zones 9b to 11 ( est )

Acacia senegal ( Senegal Gum Arabic )
A flat-topped, medium-sized, deciduous tree that is a widespread native to the plains of subsaharan Africa as well as Oman, Pakistan and northwest India. Some records include: largest on record - 66 x 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.3 feet.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are gray-green.
The fragrant white to pale yellow flowers borne in long spikes, up to 4 inches in length, appear autumn and winter.
At the base of each leaf are 3 fierce small pricles, one curves downward, the other 2 curve upward.
The attractive, gray-brown bark is pale and flaky.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 in full sun, thriving in climates with 10 to 15 inches of rainfall in an average year. It can survive droughts lasting up to 11 months and prefers a climate with a dry season lasting at least 5 months.

'leiorachis'
Some records include: 2 years - 6.5 feet; 4 years - 10 feet; 5 years - 16 feet; 9 years - 19 feet.

'rostrata'
Some records include: 2 years - 7 feet; 4 years - 10 feet; eventually up to 16 feet.

Acacia siculiformis ( Dagger Myrtle )
A shrub, reaching up to 10 x 6 feet, that is native to far southeastern Australia including Tasmania.
The narrow lance-shaped to narrow-elliptic leaves, up to 1.5 x 0.2 inches, are green.
Thr bright yellow flowerballs, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne from the leaf axils.
The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 9, thriving on well drained soil.

Acacia sieberiana ( Paperbark Thorn )
A very fast growing, flat-crownded, medium to large, deciduous tree native to southern Africa. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; 2 years - 14 feet; 3 years - 20 feet; 6 years - 28 feet; 7 years - 30 feet; 10 years - 40 feet; largest on record - 82 x 51 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet.
It makes an excellent street tree for dry climates such as in southern Arizona.
The feathery, bipinnate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are deep green, turning to yellow in fall. The leaves are composed of leaflets, up to 0.12 inches in length.
The profuse fragrant flowerballs are creamy-white.
The stems are armed with paired white thorns, up to 3 inches in length.
The yellowish-brown, flaky, papery bark peels off in flat strips.
Hardy zones 9 to 11. Very drought tolerant, it also tolerates flooding, sand and clay.
A healthy attractive shade tree even in the extreme heat of Yuma.
Pharmacology: leaf contains DMT

'woodii'
A perennial in Tucson, dying back to the ground at 15 F

Acacia simplex
A climbing tree reaching up to 40 feet that is native to both Argentina and islands in the western Pacific Ocean.
The cupped, rounded leaves are bright green.
Pharmacology: bark, stem bark and leafy stems contain high levels of DMT.
This plant has been used in fishing. Products of this plant are harmless to humans but stun fish.

Acacia smallii ( Small's Acacia )
May be the same as Acacia farnesiana and is in fact nearly biologically similar. This tree represents trees of southwestern U.S. origion and are much hardier ( to 15 F ).
Whether or not it is a separate species or just a regional variant of Acacia farnesiana is a subject of botanical debate.
The bipinnate leaves are composed of tiny leaflets, up to 0.1 inches in length.
Hardy zones 8b to 10

Acacia sophorae ( Coastal Wattle )
A dense spreading shrub that is a widespread native of eastern Australia and Tasmania, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 33 feet.
An excellent choice for use in preventing beach erosion. On exposed coastal sites, it is often prostrate in habit.
The broad, oblong phyllode leaves are up to 5 x 1.5 inches.
The golden-yellow bottlebrush-like flower spikes, up to 2 inches in length, are borne during spring.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 in full sun to partial shade, very tolerant of salt laden winds.
Pharmacology: contains Tryptamine

Acacia spectabilis ( Mudgee Wattle )
Also called Pilliga Wattle. An open, pendulous, tall slender shrub native to the inland slopes of eastern Australia that reaches a maximum size of 20 x 15 feet. Some records include: 3 years - 7 feet; 5 years - 17 + feet. It can also be used as a screen.
The soft, blue-green, bipinnate leaves, up to 4 inches in length are composed of leaflets up to 0.7 x 0.25 inches.
The spectacular, golden-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.4 inches, are borne on long, dense sprays, up to 8.5 inches, during late winter and spring.
The smooth bark is whitish to blue-gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F. Drought tolerant.
Prune lightly after flowering to maintain shape.

Acacia stenophylla ( Shoestring Acacia )
A beautiful fast growing, pendulous tree, that is native to central and eastern Australia. Some records include: 16 months - 13 feet; largest on record - 66 x 30 feet. It is similar to Acacia salicina and makes an excellent landscape tree in the southwestern U.S.
The very long narrow leaves are up to 20 x 1 inches.
The pale yellow flowerballs, up to 0.5 inches across, are borne from the leaf axils.
The fibrous to fissured bark is dark gray-brown.
Hardy zones 8b to 11 ( tolerating as low as 15 F ) in full sun on well drained soil.
Tolerates clay, alkaline soil, drought and flooding. Very tolerant of saline soils.
Seed should be soaked in boiling water for 1 minute before sowing.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Aug 15 2014 @ Rawlings Conservatory, Baltimore, MD


Acacia suaveolens ( Sweet Wattle )
A shrub, reaching a maximum height of 10 feet, that is native to coastal eastern Australia and Tasmania.
The linear to oblanceolate, phyllode leaves, up to 6 x 0.4 inches, are green.
The pale yellow flowerballs, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne on axilliary racemes up to 1.3 inches in length.
The bark is smooth and purplish.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( est ). Tolerates pure sand.

Acacia subporosa ( Narrow-Leaf Bower Wattle )
A semi-pendulous, small tree, reaching a maximum height of 40 feet, that is native to far southeastern Australia. Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet.
The narrow-elliptical phyllode leaves are up to 5 x 0.4 inches.
The pale yellow flowerballs are up to 0.4 inches across.
The smooth bark is gray or brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( est )

Acacia terminalis ( Cedar Wattle )
Also called Sunshine Wattle. A medium size tree reaching a maximum size of 66 ( rarely over 20 ) feet, native to southeastern Australia.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 4.5 inches in length, are composed of oblong leaflets, up to 0.8 x 0.2 inches. The foliage is reddish at first, turning to glossy deep green.
The golden-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.5 inches, are borne on panicles.
The gray or brown bark is smooth, becoming finely fissured on older trees.
Hardy zones 9 to 10

Acacia tetragonophylla ( Kurara )
An attractive, dense, semi-pendulous, rounded, shrub or small tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 20 ( rarely over 10 ) feet, that is a widespread native to western and central Australia. Some records include: 2 years - 6 feet.
The prickly, needle-like, linear leaves, up to 2 x 0.12 inches, are bright green.
The bright yellow flowerballs, up to 0.4 inches, are borne from the leaf axils.
The gray bark is finely fissured.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( fully hardy to 16 F with foliage damage only ). Extremely drought tolerant.

Acacia tindaleae ( Golden-Top Wattle )
A dense small shrub reaching a maximum height of 6.5 feet that is native to eastern Australia.
The very hairy, small, linear phyllode leaves are densely crowded along the stems.
The profuse, golden-yellow flower balls are borne winter and spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 thriving in both subtropical and dry climates.
Prune to shape after flowering.

Acacia tortilis ( Umbrella Thorn )
A medium size, attractive, umbrella crowned tree native to most of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula
Some records include: 2 years - 8 x 10 feet; 2.5 years - 16 feet; 11 years - 22 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 inches; largest on record - 70 x 60 feet.
There is a combination of short, recurved and long, narrow spines with all being very sharp.
The very small, bipinnate leaves have very small leaflets.
The foliage is typically evergreen.
The fragrant, white to light yellow, rounded flowers are borne in small clusters in mid summer with the foliage.
They are followed by spirally twisted, light brown pods borne in clusters.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 18 F. It is extremely drought tolerant due to its roots which can extend as deep as 170 feet. It is also very heat tolerant, to as high as 122 F.^

'heteracentha'
A subspecies that ranges widely in southern Africa.
Some records include: 1.5 years - 5 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 inches

Acacia tortuosa ( Twisted Acacia )
A rounded to wide spreading, semi-evergeen to evergreen small tree native from central Texas, south into Mexico.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 31 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet.
The bipinnate leaves, are composed of 3 to 4 pairs of pinnae, each having 10 to 15 pairs of very narrow, pointed leaflets.
The foliage is light-green.
The fragrant, bright-yellow ball-shaped flowers, up to an inch wide are borne in pairs of 3s from the leaf axils.
They are followed by long narrow, slightly compressed pods, up to 5 x 0.3 inches. that constrict between the seeds.
The branches are armed with slender spines up to an inch in length.
The bark is dark brown and furrowed.
Hardy zones 8 to 10, very tolerant of drought as well as being heat and alkaline soil tolerant.

Acacia trachycarpa ( Minniritchi )
A moderately fast growing, thornless tree reaching a maximum size of 20 x 25 feet, that is native to northwestern Australia.
Some records include: 1.5 years - 9 feet.
The linear leaves are up to 4 x 0.1 inches in size.
The golden-yellow flower spikes are up to 0.8 inches in length.
The bark is reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 9b to 10 ( tolerating 25 F ).

Acacia trineura ( Three Nerved Wattle )
A rounded, evergreen large shrub, reaching a maximum height of 17 feet, that is native to southeastern Australia.
Some records include: 2 years - 9 feet; 3 years - 11 feet
The narrow, oblong leaves, up to 3.2 x 0.5 inches, are deep green.
The golden-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.2 inches across, are golden-yellow.
3 to 8 flowerballs may be contained in a raceme.
The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( fully hardy to 15 F ).

Acacia triptera ( Spurwing Wattle )
A very dense, spreading, large shrub native to semi-arid regions of eastern Australia. Some records include: 3 years - 28 inches; largest on record - 15 x 23 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 inches. It makes an excellent barrier hedge.
The stiff, curved, pointed, narrow-triangular phyllode leaves, up to 2.2 x 0.3 inches, are purplish at first, turning to mid-green.
The profuse, very showy, bright yellow, bottlebrush-like flower spikes, up to 1.3 inches in length, are borne late winter and spring.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating as low as 19 F ) in full sun on well drained soil. Extremely drought tolerant.

Acacia truncata
A dense, domed large shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 5 feet, is native to far southwestern Australia.
The tiny leaves ( shaped like upside-down triangles ) are only up to 1 x 0.5 inches.
The creamy, ball-shaped flowers are up to 0.5 inches.
Hardy north to zone 9, tolerating as low as 19 F
Requires full sun. Salt tolerant.

Acacia uncinata ( Wavy-Leaf Wattle )
An attractive, spreading to erect shrub with long pendulous branches that is native to New South Wales in eastern Australia.
Some records include: 5 years - 6 feet; largest on record - 10 feet.
The stem clasping, rounded, wavy, hook-pointed phylloides, up to 1.8 x 0.8 inches, are gray-green.
The large bright yellow flowerballs, up to 0.35 inches across, are borne single or in pairs during spring and summer and also on and off at other times of the year.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F. Drought tolerant.

Acacia verticillata ( Star Acacia )
Also called Prickly Moses. A attractive, prickly, fast growing, arching shrub to small tree ( if trained ) that is native to Tasmania and southeast Australia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 + feet; 10 years - 20 x 20 feet; largest on record - 33 x 33 feet; largest in England - 30 feet. Excellent for use in hedging.
The whorled, rigid, very sharp, linear, needle-like leaves, up to 1 x 0.3 inches, are arranged in whorls.
The bright yellow flowers spikes, up to 1.8 inches in length, are borne either single or in small groups during late winter and spring.
Hardy zones 8b to 11 tolerating as low as 19 F.
It thrives in milder parts of the British Isles.

Acacia vestitia ( Hairy Wattle )
Also called Weeping Boree. A bushy, small weeping tree reaching a maximum size of 27 x 20 ( rarely over 13 ) feet, that is native to far southeastern Australia.
The triangular leaves, up to 0.8 x 0.3 inches, are gray-green.
The showy, golden-yellow flowerballs are borne on long racemes, up to 2.3 inches in length.
The bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy north to zone 9, tolerating as low as 19 F. It can be sheared.

Acacia victoriae ( Bramble Wattle )
A moderate growing, spreading, small tree native to inland parts of Australia.
Some records include: 1 year - 5 feet; 3 years - 9 feet; 5 years - 14 feet; 8 years - 18 feet; largest on record - 40 x 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 inches.
It can be used for hedging and windbreaks as well. Short lived in many regions, lasting around 15 years. It may sucker readily.
The lance-shaped, gray-green leaves, up to 3.5 x 1 inches in size, have a strong, paired spines at the base.
The fragrant, creamy-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.3 inches across, are borne on racemes up to 4 inches in length, during late winter into early summer.
The bark is smooth and dark gray.
Hardy zones 8 to 11. Fully hardy at 15 F at Tucson. Very drought tolerant due to its deep root system which may penetrate as much as 66 feet or more into the earth.
Moderately salt tolerant.

Acacia villosa
A small thornless tree, reaching a maximum size of 23 feet, that is native to Jamaica where it is threatened. Some records include: 2 years - 8 feet; 4 years - 12 feet.
Hardy zones 10 to 12 ( freezes to base at 25 F but may reach as much as 9 feet during the following summer ).

Acacia viscidula ( Sticky Wattle )
A small tree, reaching a maximum height of 20 feet, that is native to the central part of Australia's east coast. Some records include: 4 years - 7.5 feet; 6 years - 10 feet.
The linear leaves, up to 4.3 x 0.1 inches, are glossy mid-green.
The pale yellow flowerballs are up to 0.3 inches across.
The smooth bark is gray-brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 10 ( fully hardy to 16 F )

Acacia visco
An attractive, moderate growing, rounded, medium-sized, deciduous to semi-evergreen tree, reaching a maximum size of 40 x 40 feet, that is native to Argentina.
Some records include: 2 years - 5 feet; 3 years - 9 feet; 8 years - 16 feet; 15 years - 22 feet.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 7 x 3.5 inches, are composed of linear leaflets.
The foliage is bright green at first, turning to deep green.
The showy, creamy-white flowerballs, up to 0.5 inches across, are borne during spring through summer.
Hardy zones 8b or 9 to 11. Fully hardy at 15 F at Tucson but defoliates at temperatures in the mid 20s.

Acacia wilhelmiana ( Wilhelm's Wattle )
A compact, dense, spreading, medium sized, evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 10 feet, that is native to semi-arid regions in southeast Australia.
The narrow, linear leaves, up to 1.3 x 0.16 inches, are green.
The masses of single or paired, golden-yellow flowerballs, up to 0.25 inches, are borne late winter and spring.
Hardy zone 8 to 10. Drought tolerant.

Acacia willardiana ( Palo Blanco )
A very attractive, evergreen, weeping tree, reaching a maximum size of 33 x 20 feet, that is native to the Sonoran Desert of Mexico. Some records include: 1 year - 5 feet; 2 years - 13 feet; 3 years - 17 feet; 7 years - 20 feet; 10 years - 25 feet. An excellent landscape tree in hot desert climates, it looks like a cross between a Casuarina and a Weeping Willow from a distance.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are composed of linear leaflets, up to 0.2 inches in length.
The creamy-yellow flowers are borne on bottlebrush-like spikes, up to 2.5 inches in length.
The attractive bark is white and peeling.
Hardy zones 9b to 11 tolerating as low as 25 F. Very heat tolerant, preferring a hot south facing wall north of zone 10. During extended droughts, a deep watering once a month is recommended.
Pest and disease resistant.

Acacia wrightii ( Wright Acacia )
A densely crowned, small evergreen tree reaching up to 20 x 20 feet, that is native to most of central and western Texas, south into eastern Mexico.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 3 years - 7 feet; 4 years - 11 x 4+ feet; 10 years - 15 feet; 13 years - 17 feet; largest on record - 40 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are composed of 1 to 3 pairs of pinnae, each having 3 to 5 pairs of oval leaflets, each up to 0.8 inches in length.
The somewhat hairy foliage is bright-green.
The small, fragrant, light-yellow flowers are borne in cylindrical spikes up to 1.5 inches in length.
They are followed by often curved, flattened pods, up to 6 x 1.5 inches. The pods contain narrowly oval seeds up to 0.3 inches in length. The ripened seed pods are not persistant, falling early in autumn.
The branches are sparsely armed with thick, curved brown spines.
The bark is dark brown, scaly and furrowed.
Hardy zones 7 to 10. Fully hardy at 15 F at Tucson. Very tolerant of both heat and drought. It is not known to grow in the humid eastern U.S.
Seeds germinate much better if soaked in sulfuric acid for 20 minutes before sowing to loosen the seed shells.

Acacia xanthophloea ( Fever Tree )
A handsome, widespreading, fast growing, large deciduous tree native to southeastern Africa.
Some records include: 2 years - 14 feet; 3 years - 22 feet; 4 years - 25 feet; 5 years - 30 feet; 30 years - 50 x 40 feet; largest on record - 100 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet.
The bipinnate leaves are up to 4 inches in length. The foliage is yellow-green.
The fragrant, rounded, golden-yellow flowers are borne in small clusters with the leaves during spring.
The paired, white thorns, up to 3 inches, are straight and sharp.
The bark is mature trees is smooth, powdery and yellow-green. This is among the few trees in the world that can produce photosynthesis from the bark.
Hardy zones 9 to 11. Flood tolerant. It even thrives in the extreme summer heat of Yuma, Arizona, it also thrives in Phoenix and warmer parts of Tucson.

* photo of unknown internet source

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