Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Horsetail

Equisetum

* photo taken on Apr 17 2016 in Columbia, MD


Equisetum arvense ( Common Horsetail )
Abundant in the Windsor, Essex County, Lake Erie Islands and Ohio shoreline region before 1900. It was also abundant at Detroit, Michigan during that time. In Alberta, it is found throughout. It is a widespread native of North America ( from northern Alaska to the arctic islands to southern Greenland; south throughout most of the U.S. ).

Equisetum fluviatale ( Water Horsetail )
Deciduous, reaching up to 4 feet in height. Abundant in the Windsor, Essex County and Lake Erie Islands region before 1900. It was also abundant at Detroit, Michigan during that time. It is abundant on the Canadian Prairies. In Alberta; it is found throughout except for the arid southeast. It is a widespread native of North America ( from northern Alaska to far northwest Northwest Territories to Great Slave Lake, N.W.T. to Churchill, Manitoba to the shores of James Bay to Labrador; south through much of the U.S. ).
The nodes are up to 2 inches apart.
A true aquatic plant, this plant is often used in ponds. It prefers deep wet soil.

Equisetum hyemale ( Rough Horsetail )
Also called Scouring Rush. A fast spreading perennial, reaching up to 5 ( rarely 10 feet ) x 8 feet, that is native to Europe ( except southern coast ), Asia and most of North America ( as far north as central Alaska to central Yukon to Great Slave Lake to central Manitoba to Pagwa and Hearst, Ontario to Gaspe to Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia ). Abundant in the Windsor, Essex County and Lake Erie Islands region before 1900. It was especially common in sandy Juniperus virginiana savanna around Point Pelee. In Alberta; it is found throughout.
The stout upright, bamboo-like stems are gray-green with internodes 4 inches apart.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 ( 2 & 3 for most northerly populations ) in partial shade on permanently moist to wet soils. Propagation is from division.

* photos taken on Mar 7 2013 in Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, Washington, DC

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


var affine
Larger growing, up to 7 feet in height.

Equisetum robustum ( Giant Horsetail )
Reaches a maximum height of 8 feet. It was locally abundant on the Lake Erie Islands and Ohio shoreline before 1900; generally absent elsewhere in the Windsor/Essex County region.

Equisetum scirpoides ( Dwarf Scouring Rush )
Evergreen and spreading in habit, reaching up to 8 inches in height. It is a widespread native of North America ( from far northern Alaska to far northwest Northwest Territories to Great Slave Lake, N.W.T. to Churchill, Manitoba to northern Ontario to Newfoundland ). In Alberta; it is found throughout except for the arid southeast.
The thin leaves are deep olive-green. The nodes are up to 1.3 inches apart.

Equisetum sylvaticum ( Wood Horsetail )
Deciduous, reaching up to 2 feet in height. It is a widespread native of North America ( from Kotzebue, Alaska to far northwest Northwest Territories to far southwest Nunavut to northern Quebec and Labrador and south ). Moderately common in the Windsor, Essex County and Lake Erie Islands region before 1900. In Alberta; it is found throughout except for the arid southeast. It is found in wooded swamps in the wild.
The internodes are around 2.5 inches in length.

* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Equisetum telmateia ( Great Horsetail )
Deciduous, reaching up to 6.5 feet in height. It is native to western North America ( from Anchorage, Alaska to southeast British Columbia to northern Idaho; south into northern California ).
The internodes are about 3.5 inches in length.

No comments:

Post a Comment