Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Lady's Mantle

A small genus of groundcover perennials that are distant relatives of the Roses.
They mostly prefer partial shade and are drought tolerant once fully established but dislike hot afternoon sun which can burn the leaves. Insect pests and diseases are rare, deer also avoid them. If these plants look worn and tired by late summer, remove faded leaves but do not cut the entire plant back until early spring.
The Lady's Mantle is easy to grow but does prefer a moist, fertile, humus-rich, well drained soil. It makes a great container plant for the urban garden.
Propagation is from seed, sown fresh during autumn or spring.
The seedlings should be transplanted while small.

* photo of unknown internet source




Alchemilla alpina ( Alpine Lady's Mantle )
A very attractive compact, mounding perennial, that is native to Eurasia and Greenland. It can eventually form a mat, reaching up to a maximum size of 1 x 3 feet. It can be mass planted for groundcover and looks great mixed with dwarf Hosta.
The showy hexagonal, silvery leaves, up to 3.5 inches across, are smaller than that of Alchemilla mollis.
The greenish-yellow flowers are borne all summer long.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in sun or partial shade on well drained soil.
Drought tolerant and not generally bothered by pests or disease.
Propagation is from seed and it often self seeds.

Alchemilla ellenbeckii ( Creeping Lady's Mantle )
A moderate growing, dwarf species, reaching a maximum size of only 8 inches x 2+ feet. It is excellent for use lining paths as well as in rock gardens.
The tiny, pleated leaves, up to 1.7 inches across, are mid-green.
The greenish-yellow flowers are borne all summer long.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial to full shade on permanently moist, well drained soil.
It is not generally bothered by pests or disease.

Alchemilla erythropoda
A very attractive vigorous perennial, that is native to southeast Europe ( Romania to the Caucasus; south to Yugoslavia to northern Turkey to northern Iran ). It can eventually form a mat, reaching up to a maximum size of 1 x 3 feet. It can be mass planted for groundcover.
The showy hexagonal, blue-green leaves, up to 3.5 inches across, are smaller than that of Alchemilla mollis.
The greenish-yellow flowers are borne during late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in sun or partial shade on very well drained soil.
Drought tolerant and not generally bothered by pests or disease.

Alchemilla faroensis ( Dwarf Lady's Mantle )
A moderate growing, dwarf species, reaching a maximum size of only 3 x 15 inches, that is native to the Faroe Islands.
The leaves, up to 1.7 inches across, are mid-green.
The greenish-yellow flowers are borne during late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on permanently moist, well drained soil.
It is not generally bothered by pests or disease.

Alchemilla glaucescens
Also called Alchemilla pubescens. A mounding perennial, reaching a maximum size of 1 x 2 feet. It can be mass planted for groundcover.
The leaves are rounded and blue-green.
The green flowers are borne during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in sun or partial shade on very well drained soil.
Drought tolerant and not generally bothered by pests or disease.

Alchemilla mollis
A very attractive, vigorous, mounding perennial, that is native from eastern Europe ( Romania to western Russia; south to Greece to the Caucasus & northern Iran ). It is naturalized in the Great Lakes of North America locally around Wiarton and Tobermory, Ontario. It can eventually form a mat up to 2 x 3 or rarely 2.5 x 4 feet in size. It can be mass planted for groundcover.
The showy, scalloped, hexagonal, soft-downy, gray-green leaves are up to 6 x 6 inches in size.
The greenish-yellow, star-shaped flowers are borne all summer long.
They will sometimes rebloom during early autumn if deadheaded.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 in partial shade on cool, deep, fertile, moist, well drained soil.
Very tough and easy to grow, it is very drought tolerant and not generally bothered by pests, disease or deer. The foliage can be cut back during late summer if necessary to produce an flush of new growth during autumn. Plants are typically cut back during late fall once the frosts wither the foliage. Propagation is from seed or division while dormant.

* photo taken on annual Horticultural Society of Maryland Garden Tour


* photos taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

* photos taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON


'Thriller'
Reaches a maximum size of 1.5 x 4 feet with pleated, fuzzy gray-green foliage and clusters of bright yellow flowers borne late spring into early summer.

Alchemilla vulgaris
Deeper lobed leaves up to 6 inches and with smaller greener flowers but otherwise similar to Alchemilla mollis.

Alchemilla xanthochlora
A mounding and spreading perennial, reaching up to 20 inches x 2 feet, that is native to Europe.
The toothed, 9 or 11 lobed, kindney-shaped leaves are smooth above, hairy beneath. The foliage is yellow-green.
The yellowish-green flowers are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial shade.

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