Thursday, August 12, 2010

Tamarisk

Tamarix

* photo taken by E.R. Mosher @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photo


Tamarix africana ( African Tamarix )
European populations are sometimes referred to as Tamarix dalmatica. A rounded, small tree, reaching a maximum height of 27 feet, that is native to coastal marshes & streamsides in southwestern Europe & northern Africa.
The tiny leaves are up to 0.2 inches in length.
The pink flowers are borne during spring.
The bark is dark brown.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 in full sun. It is tolerant of seashore conditions.

Tamarix anglica ( English Tamarisk )
A moderate growing, large shrub to small tree, reaching a maximum size of 17 x 17 feet, that is native from the British Isles to western France; south to Portugal and northwestern Spain. It is closely related to Tamarix gallica and is considered a subspecies by some.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in full sun. It thrives in and actually prefers coastal sites by the ocean.

* historic archive photo


Tamarix aphylla ( Athel Tree )
A very fast growing tree native to western Asia and northeastern Africa. Some records include: 2 years - 16 x 13 feet; 12 years - trunk diameter of 1 foot; largest on record - 65 x 72 feet with a trunk diameter of 5.5 feet.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 ( tolerating as high as 120 F ) on deep, sandy, well drained soil. It requires 4 ( on deep soil ) to 20 inches of average yearly precip. the Athel Tree is very salt tolerant.

* historical archive photo


Tamarix canariensis ( Canary Island Tamarix )
A small, spreading tree, that is native to the Canary Islands and southern Europe. Some records include: 2 years - 13 feet; largest on record - 33 x 23 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 inches.
The blue-green leaves are narrow and small ( up to 0.1 inches long )
The pink flowers are similar to that of Tamarix ramoissima.
The bark is reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 9 to 10.

Tamarix chinensis ( Salt Cedar )
Also called Tamarix juniperina. It is considered by some to be only a subspecies of Tamarix ramoissima. A moderate growing, dense, large shrub to small tree that is native to eastern China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 45 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.5 feet ( in Albuquerque NM ).
The wispy foliage is gray-green.
The bright pink flowers appear mid to late spring, often repeating late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 ( 5 for seed source from Liaoning Province in China ).

* photo taken by Joe F. Duft @ USDA NRCS. 1992. Western wetland flora


Tamarix gallica ( French Tamarisk )
A moderate growing, rounded, small tree native to coastal northwestern France and the Mediterranean region. Some records include: 20 years - 17 feet; largest on record - 35 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.8 feet.
The blue-green leaves are narrow and small ( up to 0.2 inches long ).
The bright pink flowers are borne on cylindrical panicles on current years growth during late spring into early summer.
The scaly, fissured bark is brown.
Hardy zones 5 to 10, it thrives on pure sand and is sometimes used for shoreline stabilization in the British Isles. It is very tolerant of wind and salt.

* historic archive photo

* video found on internet


Tamarix hispida
A deciduous, large shrub or small tree, reaching up to 20 feet, that is native to Afghanistan, southeast Mongolia, northwest & north-central China.
The very linear leaves are up to 0.9 inches long. The foliage is gray-green.
The pale-yellow flowers are borne on racemes, up to 7 inches long, during mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 2 to 6 in full sun on well drained soil. It is extremely drought tolerant as much of its natural range includes desert climates.

* historical archive photo


Tamarix parviflora ( Early Tamarisk )
Typically a pyramidal to rounded, large shrub or small tree that is native to southeastern Europe ( from the Balkans to Greece ). Some records include: largest on record - 44 x 36 feet with a trunk diameter of 5.6 ( over 2 is rare ) feet.
The leaves are narrow and pointed, up to 0.2 inches long.
The bright pink flowers are borne in late spring on panicles produced on older wood.
The purple branches are slightly arching. The bark on older plants is reddish to dark brown and smooth.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 though stem tip dieback is possible on exposed locations north of zone 6. It is very drought tolerant due to its deep taproot. Prune plants immediately after after blooming. They can be grown from 10 inch long hardwood cuttings taken during autumn.

* photo of unknown internet source


Tamarix ramoissima ( Late Tamarix )
Also called Tamarix pentandra. A fast growing, upright, arching large shrub to small tree around 20 feet. It is native from eastern Europe to western & southern Mongolia; south to Iran to Afghanistan to north-central China. Some records include: 5 years - 8 x 8 feet; largest on record - 38 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet. The Late Tamarix can live up to 100 years.
The narrow, pointed, lance-shaped leaves are blue-green.
The small, pink flowers are borne in dense racemes from late summer into late autumn.
The bark on older trees is dark gray.
Hardy zones 2b to 8 ( protected sites in zone 4 and north or it may behave more like a perennial...Mongolian seed source may be wood hardy to zone 2a though further testing is needed ) in full sun on deep, well drained soils; it grows well in the harsh climates of the Great Plains, even in Alberta. They are very sand, salt and wind tolerant, and are excellent for the seaside. It is often pruned back hard during early spring by cutting back branches by half. It can be propagated either from seed sown immediately after ripening where protected from frost or from either hardened cuttings in winter or half hardened cuttings taken in summer. It is considered a noxious weed in Colorado. The seed is not viable for more than a few weeks. For the first 4 weeks the seedlings cannot survive for more than 2 days if not kept moist.

* photos taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario



'Pink Cascade'
Very fast growing with dark pink flowers

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photo taken on June 12 2014 in Clarksville, MD

* photo taken on July 16 2016 in Bayfield, ON

'Rubra'
Magenta red flowers

'Summer Glow'
Reaches up to 15 x 15 feet with silver-blue feathery foliage and intense rosy-pink flowers borne all summer long.

Tamarix smyrnensis ( Smyrna Tamarisk )
Also called Tamarisk hohenackeri. A large shrub to small tree, reaching a maximum size of 17 x 17 feet, that is native from Romania to southern Ukraine & southern Russia; south to Greece to Turkey to Iraq to Afghanistan & Pakistan. It is found in salt marshes and along mountain streams in the wild.
The blue-green leaves are up to 0.2 inches in length.
The pink flowers are borne on racemes up to 3 inches in length, during summer.
The bark is reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 4 to 7. It is both extremely heat and drought tolerant.

* excellent photo link
http://www.nhmc.uoc.gr/en/museum/photo-archive/selection/images/nhmc.image.59837

Tamarix taklamakanensis
A rounded, deciduous, large shrub to small tree native to desert sand dunes in Xinjiang Province in northwestern China where it is endangered. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3.5 feet; largest on record - 23 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 inches; longest lived - 60 years
The tiny, triangular foliage is gray-green at first, turning to yellow-green.
The flowers appear on racemes up to 6 inces long, during mid-summer to early autumn. The flowers are deep pink at first, fading to pale pink.
The bark is black-purple.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 in full sun on very well drained, sandy soil. It is extremely drought tolerant.

Tamarix tetrandra
Very similar to Tamarix parviflora; however its natural habitat is different; being mountains instead of river banks. It is native to southeastern Europe ( from Bulgaria and Ukraine; south to Greece, Turkey and Syria ).
It is typically a pyramidal to rounded, large shrub or small tree. Some records include: largest on record - 44 x 36 feet.
The leaves are narrow and pointed, up to 0.2 inches long.
The bright pink flowers are borne in late spring on panicles produced on older wood.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 ( possibly 6 for Bulgarian seed source ).

* photo of unknown internet source

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