Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Milkweed and Butterflyweed

Asclepias
A genus of perennials, famous for attracting butterflies, particularly the Monarch.
Milkweed is also known for its milky white sap.
Propagation is by division or seed. Soak seed in hot water for 24 hours before sowing. Seeds do need cold treatment before germinating. They can be planted outdoors during autumn or kept in an envelope in the freezer from late summer until mid-spring then sow immediately. They can be grown in containers however those containers need to be deep to accomodate the root system. Milkweed are generally deer resistant.

* photo taken by Paul C. Lemon @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Asclepias cordifolia ( Heartleaf Milkweed )
A deeply-rooted, woody-based, sprawling, herbaceous perennial, reaching up to 4 x 2.8 ( rarely over 2.5 ) feet in size. It is native to open brushland and pine forests from Oregon to central California; east to western Nevada.
The oppositely-arranged, stem-clasping, cordate-ovate leaves, up to 7 inches in length, are glossy deep green, often tinged purple.
The deep reddish-purple ( deep purple in bud ) flowers, up to 0.7 inches wide, are borne on clusters during mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun on warm, dry, light, well drained soil. Drought tolerant.

Asclepias curassavica ( Blood-Flower )
A very fast growing, woody based perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6.5 x 4 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, that is native from the southern U.S. to South America. In the U.S., it is native to California, southern and coastal Texas, Louisiana and Florida south of Gainesville.
The leaves, up to 8 ( rarely over 5 ) inches in length, are glossy deep green. The foliage resembles that of Asclepias incarnata.
The deep red and orange flowers are borne in clusters up to 6 inches across.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 ( 7 on heavily mulched and protected sites ). Without a heavy winter mulch, it will not survive below 10 F.

* photos taken on Sep 22 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 7 2017 in Columbia, MD


Ascelpias curtissii ( Curtis Milkweed )
A long-lived, herbaceous perennial, reaching up to 4 x 3 feet in size, that is native to white sand dunes and sandy pinelands in most of the Florida peninsula.
The wavy-edged, elliptical or oblong leaves, up to 2 inches in length, are deep green.
The white to greenish-white flowers are borne up to 30 on terminal clusters during early summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 8b to 10 in full sun on deep, very well drained soil.

* photo taken by Mark A. Garland @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Asclepias eriocarpa ( Indian Milkweed )
A herbaceous perennial, reaching up to 4 feet in height, that is native to most of California.
The very attractive, broad obovate foliage is densely covered in white hairs. The leaves, up to 5 inches in length, can either be paired or oppositely-arranged.
The creamy-white ( rarely pinkish-white ) flowers are borne on clusters up to 5 inches wide.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun on very well drained soil. It requires a mediterranean climate and is very drought tolerant.

Asclepias exaltata ( White Woodland Milkweed )
Also called Poke Milkweed. A perennial, reaching a maximum height of 6 feet, that is native to rich woods and forest edges in eastern North America ( from central Minnesota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Grand Bend, Ontario to southeast Quebec & Maine; south to Iowa to Tennessee to northern Georgia to central Virginia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant around Point Pelee and uncommon throughout the remainder of Essex County, the Lake Erie islands and the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It also occurred sporadically in Detroit during that time.
The paired, ovate to broad-elliptical leaves, up to 12 x 4 inches, are deep green.
The nodding, white flowers are borne in large umbels during early to mid summer.
They are followed by upright pods.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Asclepias fascicularis ( Narrowleaf Milkweed )
A fast spreadind, deeply-rooted, bushy perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4.5 x 3 feet, that is native from Washington State to northern Idaho; south to southern California to Nevada to Utah.
The oppositely-arranged to often whorled, lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 x 0.7 inches in size, are bright green.
The greenish-white to lavender flowers, up to 0.2 inches wide, are borne up to 20 on clusters up to 5 inches across. They appear during early summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 in full sun on very well drained soil. Drought, heat, clay and salt tolerant.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Asclepias hallii ( Hall's Milkweed )
A rhizomatous, upright, large perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4.5 x 3 feet, that is native to the Rocky Mountains ( from northern Nevada to southern Wyoming; south to northern Arizona and New Mexico ).
The oval leaves are blue-green.
The lavener-pink to purplish-pink flowers are borne on axilliary umbels of up to 60. They appear mid to late summer, sometimes into early autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil. Very drought tolerant.

Asclepias hirtella ( Tall Green Milkweed )
A deeply-rooted perennial, reaching a maximum height of 4.5 feet, that is native to upland prairies in the Midwest ( from southern Minnesota to central Michigan to Windsor, Ontario to Delaware; south to central Oklahoma to eastern Texas to northern Georgia ). It is endangered in Minnesota, Michigan, Ontario, West Virginia, Virginia and North Carolina. In Ontario, the last remaining population has been reduced to a single plant which is under protection at the Ojibway Prairie in Windsor...an oasis in the middle of urban sprawl and commercial agriculture. It is extinct in the wild in Maryland and Delaware.
The oppositely-arranged, smooth-edged, linear to lance-shaped leaves are up to 6 x 0.5 inches in size. The attractive foliage is blue-green to mid-green.
The greenish-white flowers, up to 0.3 inches in length, are borne on rounded, axilliary clusters, up to 3 inches wide, during mid to late summer. Each flower cluster may contain 30 to 100 flowers.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on light, well drained soil. Drought tolerant.

Asclepias humistrata ( Sandhill Milkweed )
Also called Pinewoods Milkweed.

* historic archive photo


Asclepias incarnata ( Swamp Milkweed )
An upright perennial, reaching up to 7 x 3.5 ( rarely over 5 ) feet, that is native to swampland in North America ( from Montana to Manitoba to Wawa, Ontario to Tobermory, Ontario to Haliburton, Ontario to Nova Scotia; south to central Nevada to central Texas to southern Florida ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant throughout the region as well as the Lake Erie islands, the Ohio shore as well as at Detroit during the 1800s. It is sturdy in habit and does not need staking.
The oppositely arranged, narrow, lance-shaped leaves, up to 8 x 1.6 inches in size, are deep green.
The lightly vanilla-scented, deep rosy-red flowers are borne on flat-topped panicles mid-summer into early autumn.
The flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
They are followed by attractive, narrow, hanging, seed pods up to 3 inches in length.
Hardy zones 2 to 9 in full sun to partial shade, requiring moist to wet soil. Deer resistant.

* photos taken on July 17 2012 in Baltimore, MD

* video found on Youtube

* photos taken on Aug 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on Sep 18 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photo taken by Doug Goldman @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Ice Ballet'
Reaches a maximum size of 5 x 3.5 ( rarely over 3 ) feet with pure white flowers borne during summer, lasting over a longer period than regular A. incarnata.

'Soulmate'
Deep rosy-pink flowers borne on large clusters; otherwise identical to species.

* photo taken on Aug 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario


Asclepias lanceolata ( Fewflower Milkweed )

* historic archive photo


Asclepias latifolia ( Broad Leaved Milkweed )
A deep-rooted perennial, reaching a maximum height of 40 inches, that is native to prairies in the central U.S. ( from southeast Utah to far northeast Nebraska; south to southern California to Arizona to central Texas ).
The very attractive foliage is intensely blue-gray with deep red veins and midrib. The oppositely-arranged, stem-clasping, rounded leaves, up to 6 x 5 inches in size, densely clothe the stem.
The creamy-yellow flowers are borne mid to late summer, sometimes even to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 ( depending on seed source ) in full sun on just about any well drained soil.

Asclepias linearis ( Pineleaf Milkweed )
A shrubby perennial, reaching up to 5 x 4 ( rarely over 3 x 3 ) feet, that is native to desert regions of California and Arizona; south into northwest Mexico and the Baja Peninsula.
The whorled ( 3 to 6 ), fine, needle-like leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are mid-green.
The small, white flowers are borne in clusters up to 2 inches across, over a long season from early summer to late autumn.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 in full sun.

Asclepias meadii ( Mead's Milkweed )
A perennial, reaching up to 16 inches, that is originally native to tallgrass prairie in the midwestern U.S. ( from southwest Iowa to central Wisconsin to northwestern Indiana; south to eastern Kansas to southern Missouri to southern Illinois ). It became extinct in Wisconsin and Indiana before being reintroduced.
The oppositely-arranged, broadly-ovate leaves are up to 3 x 2 inches in size.
The greenish-white flowers appear in an umbel containing 6 to 15 on the top of the stem during early summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in full sun on well drained soil.

Asclepias ovalifolia ( Oval-Leaved Milkweed )
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 20 inches tall, that is native to sandy oak savannas and prairies in central North America ( from southeast British Columbia to Edmonton, Alberta to Saskatchewan to Kenora, Ontario to International Falls, Minnesota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula; south to northeast Wyoming to central Iowa to northern Illinois. It is endangered in Alberta, Ontario, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois and Montana. It is not invasive and makes a great plant for small gardens.
The oval leaves, up to 3 x 1.5 inches in size, are oppositely-arranged. The foliage is mid-green above, downy bright green below.
The very fragrant, greenish-white flowers are borne in rounded clusters, up to 2 inches wide, during early to mid summer. The bloom season usually last up to 3 weeks.
Hardy zones 3 to 5 in full sun to partial shade on sandy, well drained soil.

Asclepias purpurascens ( Purple Milkweed )
A perennial, reaching a maximum height of 5.5 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, that is native to eastern North America ( from South Dakota to southeast Minnesota to central Wisconsin to central Michigan to southern Ontario to north-central Pennsylvania to New Hampshire; south to eastern Oklahoma to northern Louisiana to northern Georgia to eastern North Carolina ). It is endangered in Nebraska, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ontario, New York State, Massachusetts, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Mississippi and Louisiana. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was locally abundant along the Detroit River as well as along the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit at that time. It is similar to A. syriaca but less aggressive and shade tolerant.
The broad-oval leaves, up to 8 x 4 inches, are deep green.
The deep purplish-pink flowers are borne over a period lasting up to 4 weeks during late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. Tolerant of dry shade.

* photo taken by William C. Taylor @ USDA SCS. 1989. Midwest wetland flora

* photos taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON

* photos taken on Sep 18 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD


Asclepias quadrifolia ( Four-Leaved Milkweed )
A perennial, reaching up to 32 inches in height, that is native to open woods in eastern North America ( from eastern Kansas to southeast Iowa to central Illinois to northern Ohio to Niagara Falls to northern Vermont to southern New Hampshire; south to eastern Oklahoma to northern Alabama to northern Georgia to central Virginia...with a separate population in southern Ontario and between Belleville and Kingston in eastern Ontario ). It is endangered in Canada and is absent from Michigan though likely once occurred there. It is now extinct in the Niagara region of Ontario. It is also endangered in Kansas, Vermont, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, New Jersey and Delaware. It occurred sporadically on the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The lance-shaped to ovate leaves, up to 6 x 2 inches in size, are borne on whorls along the stems. The foliage is bright green to mid-green.
The white to very pale pink flowers are borne on rounded clusters during early summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in partial shade.

* historic archive photo


Asclepias rubra ( Red Milkweed )
A perennial, reaching a maximum height of 5.5 feet, that is native to marshes, bogs and moist pine barrens in the southeastern U.S. ( from Arkansas to New York City; south to southeast Texas to far northern Florida. It is extremely rare and widely scattered over most of its range. Red Milkweed is endangered in Alabama and now extinct in Georgia.
The oppositely-arranged, lance-shaped leaves, up to 8 x 2.5 inches in size, are luxuriant glossy mid-green.
The pink to reddish-pink flowers are borne during early to mid-summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on moist to wet acidic soil. It is heat but not drought tolerant.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on July 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 2 2016 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken on July 7 2017 in Columbia, MD


Asclepias speciosa ( Showy Milkweed )
A fast growing to invasive, rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6 x 3.3 ( rarely over 4 ) feet, that is native to Central North America ( from south-central British Columbia to Calgary, Alberta to Brooks, Alberta to Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask. to Dauphin, Manitoba to Wisconsin; south to central California to northern Texas to Chicago ILL ). It is endangered in Alberta and Iowa. Showy Milkweed forms large clumps when grown on ideal sites. It is usually found on moist prairie in the wild.
The oppositely-arranged, oblong leaves, up to 8 x 3 inches in size, are densely white-felted beneath.
The fragrant, purplish-pink flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are borne on rounded clusters, up to 3 inches wide, during late summer.
Has potential for future commercial cultivation for biofuels, yielding up to 400 gallons of methanol and 250 gallons of ethanol per acre. After removing these chemicals, the remains of the plant can be used as livestock feed and are nutritionally equal to Alfalfa.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on just about any moist to wet soil.

* photo taken by Doug Goldman @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Asclepias subulata ( Rush Milkweed )
A moderate growing, evergreen perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 4 feet. It is a desert native to southern California, southern Nevada and Arizona as well as the Baja Peninsula and northwestern Mexico. When not in bloom, it looks much more like a Rush than a Milkweed, with stiffly upright gray-green stems. It is a stunning plant to combine with Mediterranean architecture or to use around pools, along pathways and in court yards.
The leaves, up to 2 x 0.1 inches, are gray-green. They typically only appear on the plant briefly during periods of rainfall.
The pale yellow flowers, up to 0.6 inches in length, are borne 8 to 15 per terminal cluster during spring to autumn.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating 18 F ) in full sun to partial shade on sandy, very well drained soil. It is extremely drought and heat tolerant. Cut back old clumps to base to force fresh new growth.

Asclepias sullivantii ( Prairie Milkweed )
A deeply-taprooted perennial, reaching a maximum height of 40 inches, that is native to moist prairies and floodplains in the Midwest ( from southeast North Dakota to central Minnesota to southern Wisconsin to Saginaw, Michigan to far southern Ontario; south to central Oklahoma to soutern Illinois to central Ohio ). It is extinct in North Dakota and endangered in the wild. It occurred at the Ojibway Prairie in Windsor, Ontario and sporadically on the Ohio shore during the 1800s but has declined considerably since. Unlike similar looking Asclepias syriacus, it does not invasively spread, making it a great garden plant.
The stem-clasping, thick, broadly-oblong leaves, up to 8 x 3 inches in size. The foliage is mid-green with a bold pinkish-red midrib that distinguishes it from Asclepias syriacus.
The fragrant, showy, pinkish-red flowers, up to 0.7 x 0.5 inches, are borne 15 to 25 per rounded cluster, up to 3.5 inches wide, during early to mid-summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun on moist to wet soil.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Asclepias syriaca ( Milkweed )
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 7 x 5 feet, that is native to dry grasslands in North America ( from Saskatchewan to Manitoba to Sault Ste Marie to Timmins, Ontario to Haliburton, Ontario to New Brunswick; south to western Kansas to northern Georgia ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant throughout the region, the Lake Erie island, the Ohio shore as well as at Detroit during the 1800s.
The paired, broad oblong leaves, up to 12 x 7 inches, are bright green above, gray woolly beneath.
The fragrant flowers, up to 0.25 inches wide, are borne on dense umbels, up to 4 inches across, during early to late summer.
Hummingbirds and honey bees love the nectar rich flowers.
Few insects feed on Milkweed other than the Monarch Butterfly which is dependent on it.
The milky sap was used as an antiseptic wound dressing by the natives.
Hardy zones 2 to 9 in full sun on well drained soil.

* photos taken on June 24 2011 in Columbia, MD





* photo of unknown internet source


* photo taken on July 10 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos of unknown internet source

* photo taken on May 4 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 21 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 30 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 1 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 16 2016 in Bayfield, ON

* photos taken on July 7 2017 in Columbia, MD

* historical archive photo


Asclepias tomentosa ( Velvet Leaf Milkweed )

* historic archive photo


Asclepias tuberosa ( Butterflyweed )
A long-lived, clumping, bushy, woody-based perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5o inches x 4 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, that is native to prairies and open woods in central and eastern North America ( from far eastern North Dakota to northern Michigan to Stoke's Bay, Ontario to Niagara Falls to New Hampshire and Maine; south to Arizona to Florida ). It is endangered in most northeastern states it resides in. It has also become extinct in the wild in Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine and Bruce County in Ontario. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was sporadic at the Ojibway Prairie in Windsor, Point Pelee, the Ohio shore as well as at Detroit during the 1800s. It was abundant on the Lake Erie islands during that time. Butterfly Weed is late to emerge during spring and planting with bulbs such as Crocus's is recommended for a longer season of color.
The alternatively-arranged, oblanceolate leaves, up to 6 x 1 ( rarely over 4 ) inches in size, are mid-green.
The showy, bright orange flowers are borne in clusters, up to 5 inches across, all summer long. It is a repeat bloomer unlike most other Milkweeds.
The flowers attract butterflies and birds.
They are followed by seed pods up to 6 inches in length, that are green.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on deep, sandy, well drained soil with added organic matter. Tolerant of heat and drought and actually prefers to be somewhat dry once established. It is also tolerant of excessive wind and even fire and is not eaten by deer. Difficult to transplant due to deep taproot. Year old seedlings are often killed during the first winter by frost heaving if not protected by mulch. Deadheading will extend the bloom season.

* photos taken on Jun 14 2011 in Baltimore County, MD


* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken on June 20 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on Aug 3 2012 in London, Ontario

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC

* photos taken on June 26 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 29 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 18 2016 in Grand Bend, ON

* photo taken on May 28 2017 in Howard Co., MD

* historic archive photo

* photos taken on June 25 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Clay'
A form that thrives on heavy clay ( unusual for A. tuberosa ) and in fact originated on a heavy clay prairie.

'Gay Butterflies'
Reaches up to 3 feet, with a mixture of yellow, orange and red flowers.

'Hello Yellow'
Similar except for intense bright yellow flowers. Looks stunning when massed, great for commerical landscape projects.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


'Western Gold Mix'
Vigorous with luxuriant dense deep green foliage and deep golden-orange flowers borne on large, dense heads.
Hardy zones 4 to 8, tolerating alkaline soil.

Asclepias variegata ( White Milkweed )
A sturdy, upright perennial, reaching up to 3.3 feet in height, that is native to sandy meadows and dry upland woods in the eastern U.S. ( from eastern Oklahoma to southeast Missouri to southern Indiana to central Ohio to eastern Pennsylvania to Connecticut; south to eastern Texas to northern Florida ). It is also native from Hamilton, Ontario to Buffalo, New York; however it has been extinct in Ontario since the late 1800s.
The thick, oblong leaves, up to 6 x 3 inches in size, are deep green.
The white to very pale pink flowers are borne on rounded clusters during early to mid summer. Up to 4 flower clusters may be borne along the upper part of the stem.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun.

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


Asclepias verticillata ( Horsetail Milkweed )
A deep-rooted, rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 3 feet, that is native to prairies and open woodlands in North America ( from Saskatchewan to Manitoba to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Sarnia, Ontario to Niagara Falls to Vermont; south to New Mexico to southern Florida ). It is extinct in Vermont and Delaware; endangered in Maryland, New Jersey, New York and Massachusetts. It was locally common along the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It also occurred at the Ojibway Prairie in Windsor but has not been seen there since 1925. On ideal sites, it can be aggressive and form large, dense colonies.
The whorled ( 3 to 6 ) leaves are linear or needle-like, up to 4 x 0.1 inches in size. The dense foliage is luxuriant mid-green, turning to golden-yellow during autumn.
The sweetly fragrant, white flowers are borne during mid-summer, rarely persisting into early autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 10 in full sun on moist, fertile soil. Deer resistant.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Asclepias vestita ( Woolly Milkweed )
A vigorous perennial, reaching a maximum height of 5 x 3 feet, that is native to central and southern California.
The attractive, thick, lance-shaped to oval leaves, up to 6.7 inches in length, are hairy gray-green.
The yellowish flowers are borne up to 10 per rounded cluster during mid-spring to early summer.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 in full sun on very well drained soil, requiring a Mediterranean climate.

Asclepias vestita
A perennial, reaching a maximum height of 5 feet, that is native to central and southern California.

Asclepias viridiflora ( Green Comet Milkweed )
A perennial, reaching a maximum height of 32 inches, that is native to dry sandy grasslands, sand dunes and open upland woods in North America ( from British Columbia to southern Manitoba to central Wisconsin to Manitoulin Island, Ontario & New York State; south to Arizona to Texas to Georgia ). It is endangered in Ontario, New York State, Connecticut and Delaware. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant on the beaches at Point Pelee as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It also occurred in the Ojibway Prairie in Windsor but has not been seen there since 1925.
The very thick, lance-shaped to oblong leaves are up to 5 x 2 inches in size.
The yellowish-green flowers are borne all summer long.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil. It is very drought tolerant.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Asclepias wrightii ( Mojave Milkweed )
Also called Asclepias wrightii. A perennial, reaching up to 2 x 1.5 feet in size, that is native from southern California to southern Nevada, Arizona ( most of state ) and New Mexico.
The oppositely-arranged, thick, wavy-edged, ovate leaves are blue-gray to deep green.
The pale green ( tinted pink ) flowers are borne on dense rounded clusters up to 3 inches wide. It is valuable for attracting butterflies.

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

1 comment:

  1. Asclepias tuberosa ( Butterflyweed ) is used on the new race street pier in philadelphia. Looks great.

    ReplyDelete