Friday, June 17, 2011

Turtleheads

Chelone

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Chelone glabra ( Swamp Turtlehead )
Also called White Turtlehead. A fast spreading perennial, reaching a maximum height of 7 x 3 ( averaging 4 ) feet, that is native to swampy woodlands in North America ( from Manitoba to Batchewana, Ontario to Moosonee, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to northwest Arkansas to central Alabama to central South Carolina ). The stout rootsystem forms large patches. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was noted as widespread and uncommon on the Ohio shore, likely it also grew in the Great Swamp in northern Essex County and went unnoticed during the 1800s.
The attractive, ovate leaves, up to 8 x 1.6 ( rarely over 6 ) inches in size, are glossy deep green.
The pale pinkish-white, snapdragon-like flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are borne in clusters up to 2 inches, mid-summer into early autumn. The flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on deep, fertile, acidic, moist to boggy soil. It is not tolerant of dry soils. May be prone to powdery mildew on sites without good air circulation. Deer resistant. Propagation is from seed or division.

* photos of unknown internet source


* photos taken on Sep 5 2012 in Harford Co., MD

* photo taken on Sep 26 2013 in Baltimore Co., MD

* historic archive photo


'Black Ace'
Rapid growing with blackish-green foliage and blackish stems contrasting with white flowers. It is otherwise very similar to the species.

Chelone lyonii ( Pink Turtlehead )
A fast spreading, upright perennial, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 4 feet, that is native to the Blue Ridge Mountains ( in Tennessee, far northwest Georgia and the Carolinas ). It is endangered in Georgia.
The leaves, up to 7 inches in length, are glossy green.
The rose-pink ( with yellow beard ) flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are borne during summer, peaking during August, lasting well into autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on deep, moist to boggy soil.
Excellent for planting on wooded floodplains.

* photos taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum @ Swarthmore College, PA




* photo taken on Aug 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario


'Hot Lips'
Reaches a maximum size of 4 x 4 feet, with foliage that is bronzy-green, turning to glossy deep green.
The rose-pink flowers are borne late summer into early autumn.

* photo taken on Sep 23 2013 in Burtonsville, MD

* photo taken on June 1 2014 @ Maryland Horticulturalist Society garden tour, Ellicott City

* photos taken on June 24 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photo taken on July 15 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 8 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 8 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 21 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Pink Temptation'
Compact in habit, reaching up to 16 inches, with deep green foliage and bright pink flowers borne mid summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in partial to full shade.

Chelone obliqua ( Pink Turtlehead )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6 x 4 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, that is native to wet woods in eastern North America ( from Iowa to southeast Michigan to Maryland; south to northeast Arkansas to northern Alabama to South Carolina ). It is not known in the wild in Ohio and West Virginia and is very rare and localized throughout its natural range. Some records include: 5 years - 4 feet across. Looks great in a border and by the water.
The toothed, lance-shaped leaves, up to 8 x 1.6 inches in size, are glossy, very deep green.
The rosy-pink, turtlehead-like flowers are borne on stiff spikes, up to 1.3 inches long, during late summer into mid-autumn. The flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on deep, fertile, moist to boggy soils.
Deer resistant.

'Alba'
Same with white flowers borne on sturdy stems from early to mid autumn.

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