Saturday, February 27, 2010

Bamboos for all Climates

Among my favorite of all plants. The Bamboo family is much more diverse than most people think and many are NOT invasive. Selecting the right Bamboo is extremely important and makes all the difference between having an extremely attractive exotic touch to the landscape or an exotic weed. Hope you enjoy my reseach page on Landscape Bamboos; I will add many more photos this summer. One more think
YES YOU CAN GROW BAMBOO IN THE NORTH - EVEN IN CANADA! Once again select carefully. I added the hardiness limits for all the Bamboos below




* photos taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario


* historical archive photo


ARUNDINARIA

Arundinaria anceps

Reaching up to 20 feet in height and invasive in spread; graceful and arching in habit and forming a dense thicket good for screening. Foliage is bright green up to 4 inches in length.

Arundinaria humilis

An invasive spreading Bamboo reaching up to 10 feet in height with very slender stems and bright green leaves up to 7 inches in length. Hardy north to zone 6 and good for groundcover.

Arundinaria fangiana
Native to China and reaching up to 10 feet in height with canes up to 0.3 inches in diameter. Prefers full sun and is hardy to 10 F

Arundinaria fargesii ( Fargs Bamboo )
Native to China and reaching up to 30 feet in height with canes up to 2 inches in diameter. Preferring full sun and hardy to 0 F; this is a rugged plant with tough robust foliage.

Arundinaria funghomii
A very straight, upright growing Bamboo, reaching up to 30 feet in height with canes up to 1.7 inches in diameter. Foliage is dark green.
Prefers full sun, tolerating as low as 0 F.

Arundinaria gigantea ( Canebreak )
Native to the southeast U.S ( from Missouri to southern Ohio to Maryland & New Jersey; south to the eastern Texas to central Florida ); it can reach up to 33 feet in height with canes up to 1.5 inches in diameter. The Canebreak forms a unique nesting habitat for many birds including the Bachmans Warbler. Centuries ago before reckless destruction, thickets of this Bamboo covered massive acerage in the south with a habit called 'Canebreak'. Single Canebreaks often covered thousands of acres. Density was up to 65 000 canes per acres. They were considered indicators of fertile soil by the settlers, and were usually cleared for agriculture.
The fast growing Canebreak can produce as much as 6 times as much cellulose per acre compared to trees and may become a major future source of paper production.
Bamboo foliage makes an excellent mulch. The plants spread can be controlled by mowing around the grove or stepping on new shoots outside the desired area.
The evergreen foliage is mid green, though turning to bronze during severe cold. The leaves are up to 12 x 1.2 inches in size. The young tender shoots may be eaten as a vegetable.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 ( -10 F ) in sun or part shade on fertile, moist, well drained soil. The Canebreak is tolerant of high PH and wet soil. Propagation is easy from root cuttings or division while dormant. Plants grown commercially should be fertilized frequently however vigorous growing plants will quickly grow back even if entirely cut to the ground.
Seed production is often sparse thus not being a reliable means of reproduction.

* photo taken on Aug 25 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* photos taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.



'Macon'
Strongly upright and hardy & evergreen down to -22 F.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Tecta'
Reaches up to 8 feet in height with stems up to 0.5 inches across.
It produced seed much more heavily, every to 5 years.
Hardy to -10 F

Arundinaria vagans
Growing up to 6.5 feet in height at most; this invasive Bamboo forms dense carpets and can be an good groundcover for wild gardens. It has very narrow stems and narrow leaves to 7 inches in length.

BAMBUSA
A family of attractive ornamental Bamboos that are fast growing once established but not invasive. They grow best on deep, moist fertile soil in full sun with some protection from excessive wind.




* photo taken @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida

* historic archive photo


Bambusa arnhemica ( Australian Bamboo )
Native along water courses and rainforest edges in far northern Australia; this attractive Bamboo forms a clump to 26 x 30 feet in size. The canes are up to 4 inches in diameter, are hollow with thick walls and the upper stems arch over gracefully. The foliage is green, long and narrow. A tropical Bamboo; hardy zones 11 and warmer.

Bambusa arundinacea ( Giant Thorny Bamboo )
A massive very fast growing Bamboo native to India that is popular in Miami. It can reach up to 120 feet in height with stems up to 7 inches in diameter.
The green leaves are up to 8 inches in length.
Hardy to as cold as 27 F

* historic archive photo


Bambusa beecheyana
Very fast and attractive, growing to 60 feet in height with dark green canes up to 5 inches in diameter.
The leaves are up to 7 inches in length.
Hardy north to zone 9 tolerating as low as 15 F

* photo taken on Jan 3 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida


Bambusa blumeana
Native to India and Indonesia and reaching as high as 82 feet with stems up to 8 inches in diameter. Makes an excellent thorny hedge and is hardy to as low as 28 F

Bambusa brandisii

* photo taken on Jan 3 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida


Bambusa burmanica ( Burmese Bamboo )
Native to Burma and reaching as hight as 60 feet with stems up to 4 inches in diameter.
The leaves are large up to 12 x 2 inches.
Prefers full sun and is hardy zones 10 and warmer

Bambusa edulis ( Odashi Bamboo )
Native to Taiwan and reaches up to 65 feet in height with stem diameters up to 3 inches. Prefers full sun and is hardy to 20 F

Bambusa lako ( Timor Black Bamboo )
A giant Bamboo native to Timor and reaching up to 70 feet in height with glossy black green striped canes up to 4 inches in diameter. The young canes are green for a few months before turning dark. A clumper not producing runners, it can still form a huge clump though not invasive. Requires full sun and is hardy to 25 F.

Bambusa malingensis

* photo taken on Jan 3 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida


Bambusa membranacea
Native to the Himalayas; this clump Bamboo grows dense and attractive up to 80 feet in height with olive canes up to 4 inches in diameter. Thought not a runner, this large Bamboo can still reach 40 feet in width at maturity.

Bambusa multiplex ( Hedge Bamboo )
Native to southern China, this Bamboo can reach up to 50 feet in height with deep green stems up to 2 inches in diameter. The clumps of extremely crowded stems do not reach more than 10 feet across the base even after many years. This easy to grow Bamboo is NOT invasive. The foliage is green and thin and reaches up to 6 x 0.7 inches in size. Hardy zones 7 to 11 with reports of success in zone 6 if sheltered.

'Alphonse Karr'
A beautiful clumping Bamboo to 40 feet in height with bright yellow canes striped green to 3 inches in diameter. Arching in habit with dense green foliage. Prefers full sun and hardy to 5 F.

'Fernleaf'
A fine textured plant only reaching up to 20 feet in height with arching canes up to 0.5 inches in diameter. The branch tips weep on this attractive plant.

'Golden Goddess'
Gold stems

'Silverstripe'
Reaching up to 45 feet in height with silver stripes on its leaves and stems.

Bambusa nutens
Native to eastern India and reaching up to 40 feet with stems up to 3 inches in diameter. Hardy north to zone 9.

Bambusa oldhamii ( Timber Bamboo )
A very attractive Bamboo lush and leafy in appearance that is native to southern China and Taiwan. It can reach up to 70 feet in height with "bamboo poles" ( culms ) up to 5 inches in diameter. Neither invasive or running; in 20 years a clump will only be 10 feet across ( eventually up to 40 feet across ) making this an excellent tall Bamboo for confined areas. Can reach up to 20 feet in height in 3 years.
The canes are bright green with a whitish bloom aging to yellowish in color.
The glossy dark green evergreen foliage reaches up to 12 x 2.5 inches in size. Hardy as an evergreen north to zone 9, deciduous cane Bamboo to 15 F and surviving as a dieback perennial to as cold as 0 F. Best grown on its own since its greedy roots tend to steal water and nutrients from surrounding plants. Can be planted as a windbreak where winds aren't dry and too strong.

* photo taken on Jan 3 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida


Bambusa polymorpha
Native to southeast Asia, India & China; this Bamboo grows large to 90 feet in height with canes up to 6 inches in diameter. Hardy to 27 F; it is popular in India but rare in the U.S.

Bambusa sinospinosa ( Chinese Thorny Bamboo )
A thorny clumping Bamboo reaching up to 70 feet in height with canes up to 5 inches in diameter. A great barrier plant tolerating temps as low as 20 F.

Bambusa textilis
Reaches up to 50 feet with stem diameters up to 2 inches. Hardy north to zone 8 tolerating as cold as 10 F

Bambusa tuldoides ( Punting Pole Bamboo )
Native to China and reaching up to 70 feet with attractive bright green canes up to 4 inches in diameter forming a tight clump. Foliage is up to 6 inches in length. Hardy to 27 F. Naturalized in Brazil.

Bambusa ventricosa
A very large Bamboo native to southern China reaching up to 80 feet in height with stems up to 3 inches in diameter and with foliage up to 8 x 1.3 inches.
Very fast growing and clumps can reach up to 20 feet in width. Makes an excellent tall hedge. Hardy north to zone 8

Bambusa vulgaris
Native to the eastern Tropics; this Bamboo is extremely fast growing and can reach up to 80 feet tall with canes up to 10 inches in diameter. Clumps can reach up to 40 feet across. It has been recorded that one single cutting produced 200 stems up to 42 feet tall and 4 inches wide each; in 5 years. The leaves are up to 12 x 2 inches in size. Hardy north to zone 9 and can survive as low as 10 F.

'Vittata'
Shorter stems to 60 feet in height and 4 inches in diameter that are golden yellow with green striping.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Jan 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida



Bashania fargesia
Vigorous in habit, reaching up to 20 feet.
Hardy to -12 F

Bashania qingchengshansis
Vigorous in habit, reaching up to 10 feet.
Hardy to -4 F

BORINDA

Dediduous Bamboos whos culms are usually less than 12 inches apart.

Borinda albocera ( White Wax Borinda )
A graceful, dense Bamboo, reaching a maximum height of 13 feet, with showy, pale blue culms up to 0.8 inches.
The willowy, lance-shaped leaves are up to 6 x 0.4 inches.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 in partial shade on sites protected from excessive wind.
Moderately drought tolerant.

Borinda angustissima
Also called Fargesia angustissima. A fast growing, tight clumping Bamboo, reaching up to 20 feet in height with canes up to 0.5 inches wide. The new shoots are purplish and covered in white bloom. The airy foliage is tiny ( 2 x 0.2 inches ) and the sheaths are deep purple.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 10 F ) partial to full shade, it thrives in coastal Oregon and California. In cold windy areas it is best used in a sheltered location such as a courtyard.


Borinda boldiana

Growing up to 50 feet in height with highly attractive bright blue-green stalks up to 2 inches in diameter that turn reddish-purple with age. Very lush foliage on this large robust Bamboo. This is the largest clumping Bamboo for temperate climates.
A very desirable ornamental native to the mountains of Sichuan Province in China. Hardy down to 10 F and growing best in partial shade.

Borinda fungosa
An attractive ornamental reaching up to 20 feet in height with stalks up to 1 inch in diameter. IT is native to Yunnan & Sichuan Provinces in China.
The leaves are up to 6.5 x 0.7 inches in size.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 in partial shade ( full shade in the Deep South )

Borinda grossa
Reaches up to 33 feet with culms up to 1.3 inches across.
Hardy to -4 F.

Borinda macclureana
A noninvasive, tightly clumping, tall, vigorous Bamboo, reaching up to 23 ( rarely over 18 ) feet in height with culms up to 1.3 inches across.
Hardy zones 6 to 8

Borinda papyrifera
Also called Fargesia papyrifera. An upright, clumping Bamboo, reaching a maximum height of 26 feet, with bright blue culms, up to 0.8 inches across. Noninvasive, it can spread up to 5 feet in 10 years.
The leaves, up to 5 x 1 inches, are gray-green.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 in partial shade, it is native to high altitudes and requires cool summers.

BRACHYSTACHYUM

Similar in appearance to Semi-Arundinaria

Brachystachyum densiflorum
Growing up to 10 feet in height with a stem diameter up to 0.5 inches, this Bamboo is shrub like with foliage up to 7 x 1 inch in size. Hardy to 0 F and best in partial shade.

CHIMONOBAMBUSA

Great for Mediterranean Regions but not cold climates; they typically shoot in fall and winter. Prefers cool summer areas and shade.

Chimonobambusa marmorea ( Marbled Bamboo )
Native to Japan and growing to 8 feet in height with stem diameter up to 0.8 inches. It is an attractive but aggressive, fast growing runner ( up to 8 feet across in 10 years ). New shoots are purple, the culms also turn to red in autumn.
The foliage is dense and bright green. The narrow leaves are up to 4 x 0.4 inches.
Thrives in sun or partial shade, tolerating temperatures as low as -4 F. Heat tolerant.
'Variegata' has white striped leaves

Chimonobambusa quadrangularis ( Square Bamboo )

Reaching up to 25 feet in height and fast spreading with attractive square stalks ( culms ) up to 1.5 inches in diameter. Hardy to 5 F
'Suou' has yellow culms.

Chimonobambusa tumidissinoda
A fast growing to extremely invasive Bamboo, reaching up to 20 feet and spreading up to 33 feet in just 10 years. The vivide green culms are up to 1.2 inches across.
Very attractive with a pendulous canopy of long, thin leaves, up to 4 x 0.4 inches.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in partial shade on fertile, moist soil.

CHUSQUEA ( ANDEAN MOUNTAIN BAMBOO )
These Bamboos are for cool moist summer climates as they like temperate rainforests or tropical alpine habitats. They do not like drought. The Chusqueas do not produce runners so they are not invasive even though they can be fast growing.

Chusquea culeou
Reaching up to 25 feet in height with canes up to 1.5 inches in diameter; it is a dominant understory plant in the southern Andean Roble ( Beech ) forests of its native Chile & Argentina forming dense stands. Very vigorous forming a rapid spreading clump ( up to 30 feet wide ) of arching stems and each cane can live up to 35 years. Has very attractive stems with golden leaf sheaths.
The foliage is dark green and up to 5 x 0.7 inches in size.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 tolerating as low as 0 F. In the wild it is found at high elevations up to the treeline.
Grows very well in Ireland and the Pacific Northwest but not in the extremely hot humid southeastern U.S..
Thrives in sun or partial shade.

* historic archive photo


'Gigantea'
Grows larger to 60 feet in height with canes up to 2.4 inches in diameter.

Chusquea macrostachys
very similar to C. culeou reaching up to 20 feet in height with canes up to 1.5 inches in diameter. Also hardy to 0 F

Chusquea montana

Only reaches 10 feet in height with canes up to 0.5 inches in diamter. Also hardy to 0 F

DENDROCALAMUS

Dendrocalamus asper ( Burmese Timber Bamboo )

Native to southeast Asia and reaching up to 100 feet in height with canes up to 8 inches in diameter. Prefers full sun and is hardy to 15 F and is root hardy to 10 F

* photos taken on Jan 3 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida



Dendrocalamus brandisu
Native to India & southeast Asia; this giant Bamboo can reach up to 100 feet in height with canes up to 8 inches in diameter. Prefers full sun and is hardy to 28 F

Dendrocalamus giganteus
A huge Bamboo native to Java & China. It can reach up to 133 feet tall with stems up to 14 inches in diameter. The leaves are also huge up to 22 x 5 inches.
Very dense and attractive; this is also one of the worlds fastest growing plants - growing at up to 18 inches per day.
Hardy zones 10 to 12 ( killed to ground at 25 F ).

* historic archive photo


Dendrocalamus hamiltonii
A giant Bamboo reaching up to 80 feet in height with canes up to 7 inches in diameter. Best in full sun and hardy to 27 ( killed to ground at 25 ) F

Dendrocalamus lanshuiensis

A large Bamboo reaching up to 60 feet with canes up to 5 inches in diameter. This Bamboo prefers full sun and coming from high elevations in its native habitat - prefers cool summers. Hardy to 27 F

Dendrocalamus latiflorus

Native to China and reaching up to 80 feet in height with canes up to 10 inches in diameter. Its leaves are also large up to 16 x 2 ( rarely over 10 ) inches.
Hardy zones 10 to 12 ( killed to ground at 25 F ) and requires full sun.
'Mei-nung'
Very attractive light green shoots striped dark green. Large leaves have occasional yellow stripe.

Dendrocalamus minor ( Angel Mist Bamboo )
A very attractive, arching Bamboo native to southern China reaching up to 26 feet in height with canes up to 2.2 inches in diameter. Foliage is very dense and drooping.
Requires full sun and is hardy to 28 F, thriving in Florida as far north as Jacksonville along the coast.

Dendrocalamus strictus ( Male Bamboo )
Another huge Bamboo reaching up to 100 feet in height with stems up to 14 inches in diameter. Tolerates drought, low humidity and temperatures between 22 & 116 F but not clay or wet poorly drained soil. Flowers every 35 years.

Dendrocalamus yunnanensis
A large Bamboo native to northern Vietnam and reaching up to 82 feet in height with canes up to 7 inches in diameter. Prefers full sun and tolerates temperatures down to 25 F

FARGESIA

* photo taken on Aug 20 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on Aug 17 2012 in Baltimore Co, MD



Fargesia adpressa
Native to mountains of western Sichuan Province in China and reaching up to 18 feet in height with canes up to 1.3 inches in diameter.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves are up to 6 x 0.6 inches in size.
It is hardy to 0 F and does not shoot until mid summer.

Fargesia angustissima ( Oily Bamboo )
Native to western Sichuan Province in central China, it reaches up to 18 x 4 feet in 2 years or eventually 23 feet in height with canes up to 0.8 inches in diameter. As it matures, it develops an attractive fountain habit. The new shoots are purplish-green, later turning glossy yellow-green.
The narrow leaves are up to 3.5 x 0.2 ( rarely over 2 ) inches.
Hardy to zone 7 ( tolerating 0 F ) in partial shade or also full sun where summers aren't too hot.

Fargesia denudata ( Giant Panda Fodder Bamboo )
A rare wind tolerant clumping Bamboo reaching up to 17 feet in height with canes up to 0.6 inches in diameter. It is native to mountains of central China.
The attractive willow like leaves are up to 4.3 x 0.6 ( rarely over 2.5 ) inches.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 ( tolerating as low as -20 F ) in partial to full shade. It does not enjoy hot humid climates and will not survive south of Kentucky or Virginia.

Fargesia dracocephala ( Dragon Head Bamboo )
A highly attractive, fast growing, ornamental Bamboo reaching up to 8 feet in 3 years, eventually to 16 x 15 feet ( canopy with, not base width ) with canes up to 0.8 inches in diameter. The canes turn red in sun. It is native to mountains of central China.
The lance-shaped leaves are up to 6.5 x 0.5 ( rarely over 5 ) inches in size. The dense foliage is deep green.
Very tolerant of heat and humidity and grows in sun or shade. Hardy zones 5 to 8b ( tolerating -20 F ). Unlike other Fargesias; this one thrives as far south as the Gulf Coast and northern Florida.

* photos taken on June 1 2014 @ Maryland Horticulturalist Society garden tour, Clarksville




Fargesia Jiuzhaigou ( Red Fountain Clumping Bamboo )
An extremely attractive clumping Bamboo with canes reaching up to 14 x 13 feet with canes up to 0.5 inches in diameter. The new shoots are stunning bright red and the small narrow leaves are green.
Hardy zones 5 to 9, tolerating as low as -25 F.

Fargesia murialae ( Umbrella Bamboo )
A rare arching Bamboo forming a great ornamental plant to 15 x 18 feet in height with bright green canes ( later turning blue-green ) canes up to 0.6 inches in diameter. A mature plant may have hundreds of culms but does not run underground. It is native to mountains of Sichuan & Hubei Provinces in central China.
The delicate soft pendulous airy mid green foliage is extremely attractive. The lance-shaped leaves are up to 6 x 1.3 inches in size. The foliage is semi-evergreen.
Hardy to zone 5 to 7 ( tolerating -25 F and no leaf damage at -20 F ), the hardiest of the Fargesia's, it is even known to thrive in protected locations in Calgary, Alberta and survived but weakly in Edmonton. An excellent hedge and looks awesome near water. Thrives in partial to full shade.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier nursery

* historic archive photo


'Jumbo'
Slightly taller and more vigorous, with broader leaves.

'Mary'
Upright in habit, reaching up to 12 feet with blue-green culms.

Fargesia nitida ( Fountain Bamboo )
Also called Semiarundinaria nitida. Native to mountains of central China; this Bamboo reaches up to 13 x 12 feet with very dark red-purple to black canes up to 0.6 inches in diameter. Some records include: 3 years - 5 feet. Called the Fountain Bamboo because of its extremely attractive arching weeping habit. The new culms are often not produced until mid-summer. It is great for screening.
The delicate lance-shaped leaves are up to 4 x 0.3 ( rarely over 2.5 ) inches in length. The foliage is deep green. It is a food plant for the Giant Panda.
Hardy zones 5 to 7a ( tolerating -20 F with no leaf damage and root hardy to -25 F ) with reports of even zone 3, it is one of the worlds hardiest Bamboos and has grown at Trompso, Norway for 30 years at a latitude of 30N. Not well adapted for heat and drought; these Bamboos are excellent for cool partial to deep shade location. This clump Bamboo is not invasive

'Anceps'
Reaches about the same size but is faster growing with longer leaves. It is also more open in habit.
More heat tolerant ( reported to grow well in Alabama ).

'Ems River'
more upright in habit and up to 14 feet in height. Dark purple canes.

'Great Wall'
Reaches a maximum size of 13 x 13 feet.
Hardy to -30 F.

'McClure'
the best variety with longer leaves and branches. Reaching up to 20 feet in height with canes up to 0.7 inches in diameter; it is also very vigorous and develops an attractive weeping habit.

'National Arboretum'
Elegant in habit, reaching up to 10 feet with narrow foliage.

'Nymphenburg'
Reaches up to 15 x 12 feet with weeping habit and long narrow leaves making this an extremely attractive plant.

'Stream Cottage de Belder'
Reaches up to 10 feet with dense deep green foliage.

'Wakehurst'
A rare beautiful clumping Bamboo with intense plum red stems and branchlets.
Reaches up to 12 feet in height with canes up to 0.5 inches in diameter.

Fargesia robusta
A very attractive, very vigorous, evergreen Bamboo, reaching an average of 9 x 10 feet or less commonly 23 feet tall with glossy deep green canes up to 1.3 inches in diameter. Some records include: 5 years - 18 x 12 feet. This Bamboo shoots very early during spring. It is a native of mountains of western Sichuan Province in China.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 9 x 0.8 ( rarely over 5 x 0.7 )inches in size, are deep green. The young shoots are good to eat and this is one of the Bamboos preferred by pandas.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( more recent reports mention - 15 F survival ). Prefers partial shade to shade. Tolerates sun and hot humid climates with a limit since it does seem to suffer south of Tennessee or Virginia.

* photo taken Feb 2009 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photos taken on July 15 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Nov 3 2013 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on June 1 2014 @ Maryland Horticulturalist Society garden tour, Clarksville

* photos taken on Nov 10 2014 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on June 20 2015 in Columbia, MD





* photo taken on Aug 27 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


* photo taken on Dec 20 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Feb 1 2016 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on June 13 2017 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on Oct 9 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Wolong'
More vigorous, with larger broader glossy deep green leaves ( up to 3 times the size of species ) give it a distinct tropical appearance. It can reach up to 9 feet in height in just 4 years.
The sheaths are often tinted orange and red.
Very heat tolerant in the southeast U.S.

Fargesia rufa
A vigorous, upright clumping Bamboo reaching up to 8 feet in height with canes up to 0.5 inches in diameter. Some records include: 6 years - 8 x 8 feet. It is native to mountains of central China.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves are up to 4 x 0.3 inches in size. The beautiful foliage is deep green. The culm sheaths are orange-red.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( tolerating -20 F ) in partial to full shade. Tolerant of sun and winter flooding.
Considered the best Fargesia for Michigan and southern Ontario, Canada.

* photos taken on Mar 23 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


* photo taken on Apr 23 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 18 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 5 2015 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on May 4 2017 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Oct 26 2017 in Columbia, MD



'Green Panda'
Exceptionally vigorous but still never invasive, reaching a maximum size of 12 x 12 feet. It sometimes reaches its mature size in as little as 5 years.
The dense foliage is darker than most Fargesias.

* photos taken on July 7 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Mar 7 2013 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on June 16 2013 in Columbia, MD



* photo taken on Nov 10 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 27 2015 in Columbia, MD




* photo taken on Nov 4 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Feb 1 2016 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on Oct 3 2017 in Columbia, MD





Fargesia scabrida ( Scabrida Bamboo )
A vigorous, upright Bamboo, reaching a maximum size of 16 x 10 feet with culms up to 0.25 inches. It is native to mountains of central China. It is great for screening.
The narrow, hanging leaves, up to 7 x 0.5 ( rarely over 4 ) inches, are glossy blackish-green.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in sun or shade, thriving best in cool maritime climates though tolerating warmer summers if shaded.

Fargesia utilis
Native to mountains of northeast Yunnan Province in China and reaching up to 20 x 15 feet with canes up to 1 inch in diameter. It is an excellent ornamental forming a tight based, arching clump with shoots that turn burgundy red in sun. Planted next to the water it can have the appearance of a Weeping Willow.
The lance-shaped leaves are up to 4 x 0.6 inches.
Hardy zones 7a to 8b ( tolerating to 0 F ), thriving in partial shade. It is more heat and humidity tolerant than most species, thriving south through most of Georgia.

Fargesia yulongshanensis
Reaching up to 23 ( rarely over 15 ) feet in height with culms up to 1 inch wide, this bamboo is native to mountains of northwest Yunnan Province in China.
The lance-shaped leaves are up to 3 x 0.3 inches in size.
Hardy zones 5b to 7 ( tolerating -22 F ) in full sun to partial shade.

GIGANTOCHLOA
Great clumping Bamboos for full sun

Gigantochloa albociliata
Reaching up to 30 feet in height with canes up to 1 inch in diameter. Flowers weakly yearly. Green culms bend easily.
Hardy to 30 F

Gigantochloa apus
An exceptionally strong Bamboo native to Java reaching up to 65 feet in height with canes up to 4 inches in diameter.
The leaves are up to 15 x 2.5 inches in size.
Hardy to 27 F

Gigantochloa atroviolacea
A highly attractive ornamental Bamboo native to Java & Sumatra reaching up to 55 feet in height with canes up to 4 inches in diameter. Canes are dark green at first turning deep purple-black.
Hardy to 28 F

Gigantochloa atter
Native to Indonesia and reaching up to 72 feet in height with canes up to 6 inches in diameter.
Hardy to 28 F

* historic archive photo


Gigantochloa hasskartiana
Native to Java and reaching up to 30 feet in height with canes up to 2.5 inches in diameter. Fast growing rapidly forming a dense clump.

Gigantochloa verticillata
A very attractive Bamboo reaching up to 100 feet with canes up to 5 inches in diameter. Hardy to 28 F

Gigantochloa wray
An attractive Bamboo native to Thailand and reaching up to 34 feet in height with canes up to 3 inches in diameter.
Hardy to 30 F

GUADUA ( AMAZON BAMBOO )

Running Bamboos native to the tropics; covering 47 000 square miles of the Amazon Basin. Prefers full sun.

Guadua amplexifolia

A tropical Bamboo reaching up to 60 feet with canes up to 4 inches in diameter. Some are thornless.
Hardy to 30 F

Guadua angustifolia
A tropical Bamboo reaching up to 100 feet with light green canes up to 9 inches in diameter. Very strong wooded and is insect & rot resistant. Needs precipitation from 80 to 240 inches per year and prefers wet soil.
Hardy to 30 F

'Less Thorny'
Fewer and smaller thorns than species

Guadua chacoensis
A thorny Bamboo native to northern Argentina & Paraguay reaching up to 60 feet in height with canes up to 6 inches in diameter.
Hardy to 30 F

Guadua velutina

A tropical Bamboo native to Mexico from Tamaulipas to Oaxaca; reaching up to 60 feet with canes up to 4 inches in diameter.
Hardy to 28 F

HIBANOBAMBUSA

Hibanobambusa tranquillans 'Shiroshima'

A large, aggressive running Bamboo, reaching up to 20 ( rarely over 15 ) feet in height with canes up to 1.25 inches in diameter. Attractive, long, pointed evergreen foliage to 10 x 2.5 inches is attractively variegated glossy deep green and cream.
Prefers sun to part shade and is hardy to -10 F ( foliage hardy to 0 F ).
Drought tolerant.

* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.



HIMALAYACALAMUS



Himalayacalamus asper ( Himalayan Princess )
A Bamboo, reaching a maximum height of 15 feet with canes up to 1 inch across.
It often sends up new shoots in the fall that do not leaf out until late the following spring. The culms become very red in full sun.
The leaves are up to 5 x 0.5 inches.
Thrives in sun or partial shade, tolerating as low as -5 F.

Himalayacalamus hookerianus
A clumping Bamboo reaching up to 20 feet in height with canes up to 0.7 inches in diameter.
One of the worlds most beautiful bamboos with bluish culms and very dark green foliage. Prefers sun to partial shade and hardy to 5 F.

INDOCALAMUS
Like Sasa, with strongly running habit and preferring part shade.

Indocalamus hamadae
Similar but somewhat less hardy than Indocalamus latifolius, with much larger leaves, up to 24 x 4 inches in size.
Hardy to -4 F.


Indocalamus latifolius ( Chinese Reed Bamboo )

Native to central & eastern China and reaching up to 10 feet with canes up to 0.5 inches in diameter. It forms an attractive landscape bush with leaves up to 15 x 3 inches. The foliage is glossy deep green.
Prefers partial to full shade and is hardy to -4 F.
It makes an excellent screen.

'Solidus'
Vigorous spreading but lower growing, reaching a maximum height of 8 feet with canes up to 0.5 inches in diameter. The leaves are also slightly smaller, up to 10 x 1.5 inches.
It is hardier, tolerating as low as -5 F.

Indocalamus tessellatus
Reaching up to 12 ( rarely over 8 ) feet in height with canes up to 0.5 inches in diameter.
The pointed, large foliage, reaching up to 26 x 4 inches, is the largest of any temperate Bamboo. The foliage is drooping and very glossy green looking tropical in appearance.
Good in sun or shade and is hardy to -10 F with very little foliage damage, root hardy to -15 F. Dramatic textural effect and the wind sounds awesome as it rustles through the leaves.
Tolerant of flooding and is great for erosion control along flood plains. It is tolerant of heat and humidity in the southeastern U.S. to at least as far as zone 8b.

NEOMICROCALAMUS

Neomicrocalamus andro

Reaching up to 40 feet in height with canes up to an inch in diameter; this Bamboo is a spreader with rhizomes up to 6 feet long, forming a very open clump. It is an attractive Bamboo with elegant curtains of shiny foliage cascading from its supports.
Hardy to as cold as 26 F

Otatea acuminata aztecorum ( Mexican Weeping Bamboo )
Fast growing, reaching up to 20 feet in height with canes up to 1.5 inches in diameter.
This clumping Bamboo forms dense masses of finely-cut foliage on arching branches.
One of the worlds most beautiful Bamboos. Prefers partial shade and hardy to 15 F. It thrives in the southeastern U.S. as far north as Savannah.

PHYLLOSTACHYS







* photos of unknown internet source


* photo taken on Oct 14 2015 in Baltimore Co., MD


Phyllostachys atrovaginata ( Incense Bamboo )
A very attractive running bamboo with strongly tapered stiff upright cane. Its culms grow large in diameter relative to its 33 foot height reaching up to 3 inches in width. The foliage is deep green.
This Bamboo is named for the dark green and deep red wine colors of the culm sheaths.
Edible shoots can be harvested in springtime, while the canes can be used split or unsplit for weaving. Formerly called Phyllostachys congesta
This Bamboos grows both in subtropical climates or temperate regions surviving temperatures as cold as -10°F ( roots can tolerate -15 F if mulched ). This is one of the very few Phyllostachys that are very well adapted to swampy wetland sites.

* Photo taken feb 2009 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


Phyllostachys aurea ( Golden Bamboo )
The Golden Bamboo is native to China and widely planted in the U.S. It has golden canes up to 50 ( rarely over 25 ) feet tall and up to 1.7 inches in diameter.
The leaves, up to 5 x 0.7 inches, are mid-green.
It is drought tolorant and also resprouts if cold kills stems. This Bamboo has given all Bamboos a bad reputation. It is often invasive and in the landscape it's roots should be contained. A single clump may reach up to 40 feet in width. It is hardy from zone 7 to 12 and can tolorate as low as - 10 F. This Bamboo should not be used in zone 5 or 6 where much hardier Bamboos exist.

* photos taken on Aug 15 2014 at Maryland Zoo, Baltimore, MD



'AlboVariegata'
Has white striping on the leaves.

'Holochrysa'
Has yellow canes turning orange-red. Very attractive!

'Takemuri'
Has stockier canes up to 2.5 inches across.

Phyllostachys aureosulcata ( Yellow-Groove Bamboo )
A rapid growing spreading Bamboo that is native to Jiangsu & Zhejiang Provinces in eastern China and is excellent for the Midwest U.S. and Ontario, Canada. The canes up to 46 ( rarely over 25 ) feet tall and 3 inches in diameter are yellow with a distinct greenish-yellow groove on the internodes.
The narrow leaves reach up to 7 x 0.6 inches and this Bamboo is still semi-evergreen even at - 20 F. One of the most hardy Bamboos; it grows well in sun or shade from zone 5 to 11 ( tolorating as low as - 22 F and surviving -31 F ). It is even hardy in Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, Vermont and has been grown in zones 3b/4 in Wisconsin as an 8 foot perennial. Plants have reaches up to 12 feet with canes up to 0.75 inches in Denver, Colorado after 12 years. In ideal conditions, the clumps can reach up to 50 feet across unless contained.

'Aureocaulis'
Has all yellow canes.

'Nala'
Slightly taller up to 50 feet.

Phyllostachys bambusoides ( Giant Timber Bamboo )
From China and Japan; this Bamboo reaches up to 102 feet tall with stems up to
8 inches across. Clumps can reach up to 60 feet wide. This Bamboo is used for construction, weaving and erosion control. Very fast growing, one cane was recorded growing 4 feet in a single day!
A single stem can live 20 years; and they flower every 120 years. The large lance shape leaves reach up to 9 x 2 inches. The foliage is luxuriant deep green.
It is hardy from zone 7 to 12 and can tolerate as low as 0 F

* photos taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.




* photos taken on Mar 8 2012 in Columbia, MD




'Allgold'
Has canes that are all bright gold.

'Castillonis'
Bright yellow canes with green stripes, reaching up to 50 feet in height and up to 3 inches in diameter.
The leaves are up to 6 x 1.3 inches.
It is one of the most beautiful of all Bamboos and is hardier surviving as cold as - 10 F.

* photos taken on Feb 8 2014 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC




'White Crookstem'
Zig-zag stems that are glaucous and nearly white

Phyllostachys bissetii ( Bisset's Bamboo )
A fast growing hardy Chinese Bamboo with strongly erect glossy dark green canes that become yellow with age. The canes reach up to 40 feet tall and up to 2.3 inches in diameter. Plants usually reach 20 feet in height in 3 years. It establishes rapidly, is vigorous but not invasive, however may eventually spread up to 40 feet. The new shoots appear early in spring.
The very dense foliage is bright green. It will grow in sun or shade and make a dense screen. Grows well even in northeast Ohio; the plants will reshoot from the ground even it cut back by extreme cold.
It is hardy from zone 5 to 10 and can survive as low as - 25 F if the roots are mulched; it will even hold some green leaves lower than - 10 F. Wind tolerant.

* photo taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Phyllostachys decora
An attractive Bamboo with upright light green canes that become yellowish with age and reach up to 35 feet tall and 2 inches in diameter. This is the most heat tolorant of all the Phyllostachys Bamboos tolerating as hot as 113 F. It is also hardy from zone 6 to 10 or as low as - 15 F. This strong growing Bamboo is very invasive unless contained; it grows in sun or shade and is tolerant of just about any PH, moderate drought and sand. The foliage is attractive and drooping.

* photos taken on Aug 15 2014 at Maryland Zoo, Baltimore, MD



Phyllostachys dulcis ( Chinese Edible Bamboo )
This spreading Bamboo from China has tapered and curved canes up to 40 feet tall and 3.25 inches in diameter ( even in zone 6b ). The clumps can reach up to 60 feet across. It is grown in China for its edible shoots and is fast growing on moist sites.
The lance shape leaves, up to 7 x 1 inches, are luxuriant rich green.
It is hardy from zone 5b to 11

Phyllostachys edulis ( Edible Bamboo )
resembling Phyllostachys bambusoides - this spreading Bamboo is often grown for its edible shoots. The canes are thick and usually mid-green but are sometimes yellow-green and reach up to 100 feet tall and up to a foot in diameter. Clumps may reach up to 100 feet across. With its small 5 inch very dense foliage and broadly arching stems; this is one of the most attractive Bamboos. It is hardy north to zone 7 or - 5 F. It shoots early and late spring frosts may damage it in some areas.

* Photo found on internet


* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photos taken on Aug 15 2014 at Maryland Zoo, Baltimore, MD







'Heteroclada' ( Tortoise Shell Bamboo )
has unique bizarre and highly ornamental twisted green canes to 40 feet tall and 5 inches in diameter.

Phyllostachys elegans
Like P. viridis in appearance this Bamboo grows to 32 feet tall with canes to 2.3 inches across. Hardy to 0 F

Phyllostachys flexuosa ( Zigzag Bamboo )
A large clumping fast growing Bamboo with gracefully arching dark green canes reaching up to 35 feet tall and 2.7 inches in diameter. The clumps can reach up to 20 feet across. With age the canes become almost black with whitish powdering at the nodes.
The dark green lance shape leaves reach up to 6 x 1 inches and will turn golden in full sun. This Bamboo is cold, wind, drought, alkaline and salt tolerant. It is hardy north to zone 5 or - 15 F.

Phyllostachys glauca
Hardy to 0 F; this Bamboo grows to 46 feet tall with blue-green glaucous canes to 3.5 inches across.
It is flood, alkaline and moderate drought tolerant.

* photos taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, DC





Phyllostachys heteroclada ( Purple Bamboo )
Hardy zones 6 b or to as cold as - 5 F ( possibly -20 F as a perennial if roots are mulched ) this Bamboo has very ornamental zigzag canes to 40 feet tall and 2 inches across. It is tolerant of very wet, poorly drained soil.

Phyllostachys humilis
A hedge Bamboo up to 20 feet tall with green culms to 1 inche across. Hardy to as cold as 0 F ( -15 F as a perennial ). Can take pruning well.

Phyllostachys makinoi
Growing to 60 feet in height; this Bamboo has very attractive blue-green canes to 4 inches across. It is native to Taiwan; likes hot summers and is hardy to as cold as 0 F.

Phyllostachys meyeri
A medium size Bamboo hardy north to 0 F and reaching up to 36 feet in height with canes to 2.7 inches across
Hardy zones 6b to 9 in full sun to partial shade.

Phyllostachys nigra ( Black Bamboo )
A spreading Bamboo with green canes which turn shiny purple-black with age and can reach up to 40 feet tall with diameters up to 3 inches. Clumps can reach up to 50 feet across and plants can grow to 21 feet tall in the first year.
The narrow 5 x 0.5 inch leaves are pointed and elegant. It is evergreen north to zone 7.
This Bamboo can become very invasive in milder areas and it's roots should be contained. It is hardy over much of North America from zone 6 to 12 ( 5 in some varieties )

* photos taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore College, PA

* photo taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, Washington, DC

* photos taken on Sep 21 2016 in Columbia, MD





'Bory'
Basically the same on steroids reaching up to 65 feet tall with canes to 5.5 inches across.
The leaves are up to 3.5 x 0.6 inches.
Hardy north to zone 5.

'Henon'
Is basically Phyllostachys nigra on steroids reaching up to 65 feet tall with canes to 4.5 inches across.
The leaves are up to 3.5 x 0.6 inches.
Foliage and stem hardy to -8 F, the roots may tolerate as low as -20 F if mulched.
It is also very heat tolerant, even surviving in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Very tolerant of drought and heavy clay.

'Localis'
to 46 feet tall with canes to 3.5 inches across

* photos taken on Feb 2009 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.




Phyllocstachys nuda
A central China native, reaching up to 50 feet tall with dark purple-brown canes up to 2.8 inches.
It is very hardy north to zone 4 ( - 30 F ) in protected sites and is moderately invasive covering an areas as much as 1200 sq. feet in as little as 11 years. It even thrives in Idaho where it resprouts after -30 F on mulched sites.

Phyllostachys parvifolia
New canes on this Bamboo are dark green turning paler with age and with a white ring appearing under each node. Branches are short and leaves are small. Canes sheath colors of purple-red stripes into light colors of tan or yellow-white further up. The canes reach up to 40 feet tall and 4 inches in diamter. This Bamboo is well adapted for swampy sites. Growing from zone 6 to 10; this Bamboo can tolorate as cold as - 15 F. Native to Zhejiang, China; availability is limited due to difficulties in propagation,

Phyllostachys propingua
A strong growing Bamboo reaching up to 40 feet tall with stems to 2 inches across and forming clumps up to 20 feet wide. The young culms and upper stems are dusty blue-green. The older canes are bright green and slightly arching with small clusters of fine lacy leaves, up to 4.7 x 0.5 inches. The foliage is glossy green above and pale blue-green below.
Hardy zone 6b - 10 and can tolorate as cold as - 10 F

Phyllostachys rubromarginata
A large Bamboo growing to 66 feet tall with canes to 4 inches across. Over 2o feet tall in 4th year. Even though the shooting begins late in the spring - this is a very vigorous Bamboo. The dense foliage makes it a great screen.
It is alkaline soil and wind tolerant ( even cold dry winds ) and takes pruning well. It is very cold hardy down to - 25 F though typically looses it's leaves around 0 F though has been reported to be evergreen to as low as -15 F on sheltered sites. It is somewhat shorter in the midwest, reaching around 35 feet in zone 6.

Phyllostachys viridiglaucescens
This spreading Bamboo from China has erect stems to 50 feet tall and 2.7 inches in diameter with prominent nodes. Very popular in western Europe. It is a hardy species with leaves to 8 x 0.7 inches that are bluish-green below. The young shoots are edible and the stems have a whitish bloom when young.
Hardy zones 7 to 12; tolorates as cold as - 7 F.

Phyllostachys viridis
An attractive Bamboo with gold culms ( stems ) having green stripes. The stems reach to 55 feet in height with a diameter up to 3.7 inches. It spreads slowly where summers are cool.
The leaves are up to 5 inches long.
Hardy zones 6b to 9 in sun to partial shade.
Hardy to 0 F.

Phyllostachys vivax
A very rapid growing timber Bamboo reaching up to 80 feet in height with a trunk up to 7 inches across. It can be extremely invasive. The culms are ornamental, stocky and dark green.
The large, drooping leaves, up to 8 x 1 inches, are deep green.
It is cold hardy to - 15 F.

* photo taken on Jan 11 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Aureocalis'
Similar with yellow canes

PLEIOBLASTUS
A family of Bamboos preferring shade. May be moved to ground in spring for renewal.

Pleioblastus chino 'elegantissimus'
Reaches up to 6.5 feet in height, with culms up to 0.5 inches across ( the regular non-variegated P. chino can reach a maximum height of 17 feet.
The narrow leaves, up to 3.5 x 0.2 inches, are boldly and artistically, longitudinally striped white.
Hardy to 0 F in full sun to partial shade.

Pleioblastus distichus
An excellent groundcover Bamboo, reaching up to 5 ( rarely over 4 ) feet in height. The fanned foliage is bright green. The leaves are up to 3 inches in length.
Grows well in sun or part shade and is an excellent lawn replacement hardy to -5 F.

'Mini'
A miniature groundcover form only reaching 1 foot in height. The smallest of all bamboos. A dwarf groundcover with dense, deep-green foliage to an inch in length.
It looks best when mowed once a year in early spring for fresh new growth.

* photos taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, Washington, DC



Pleioblastus fortunei
Reaching up to 5 ( rarely over 3 ) feet in height with canes up to 0.25 inches in diameter; this Bamboo makes an excellent groundcover. It is native to Japan.
The lance-shaped leaves, up to 6 x 0.6 inches in size, are borne 4 to 7 per culm. The very dark green foliage is strongly white variegated.
Prefers partial shade and is root hardy to -13 F though stems and leaves are killed at around 5 F. No worries, it actually looks better throughtout the growing season when mowed to the ground in late fall then mulched for the winter. Rake back the mulch during spring and watch the new growth explode.

Pleioblastus gramineus
A very graceful, running Bamboo reaching up to 16 ( rarely over 12 ) feet in height with canes up to 0.5 inches in diameter growing well in sun or shade and hardy to -5 F
A tall evergreen groundcover which has long very slender leaves that are lush medium green. A good substitute for large ornamental grasses in the shade.

Pleioblastus hindsii
A fast growing, very upright, dense hedging Bamboo, reaching a maximum height of 16 feet with canes up to 1 inch across.
The leathery, long, taper-pointed leaves, up to 7 x 0.6 inches, are luxuriant mid-green.
The olive-green shoots sprout throughout the season and are good to eat.
Thrives in full sun to partial shade and is hardy to as low as 0 F. Salt and drought tolerant.

Pleioblastus humilis
Native to Japan and reaching up to 7 feet in height with stems up to 0.3 inches in diameter. This Bamboo is rapid spreading and is great for erosion control groundcover. Upright in appearance with deep green foliage.
The attractive lance-shaped leaves are up to 7 x 0.7 inches.
Prefers shade to partial shade and is hardy to -15 F

Pleioblastus linearis
Native to Taiwan. Very dense, vigorous, running Bamboo, reaching up to 18 feet in height with canes up to 1 inch in diameter. The leaves are long and narrow giving a plumed appearance. Prefers full sun and is hardy to 5 F ( root hardy -4 F ). Salt air tolerant.

Pleioblastus pygmaeus
Vigorous but low growing, reaching only to 2 feet in height with canes up to 0.2 inches in diameter; this Bamboo makes an excellent green groundcover for erosion control. A single plant can spread to cover a large area ( up to 13 feet across in just 10 years ).
The narrow leaves, up to 2 x 0.2 inches, are mid-green.
Mow to ground in early spring. Best in shade or part shade and hardy to 5 F as a shrub, zone 5 ( -20 F ) as a perennial.

* photo taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, DC

* photos taken on Nov 27 2015 @ Hickory Run State Park, PA








'Wooster's Dwarf'
Even more dwarf, reaching only 4 inches in height. An excellent choice for the rock garden.


Pleioblastus shibuyanus 'Tsuboi'

Reaching up to 11 ( rarely over 8 ) feet and robust with very aggressive rhizomes ( spreads up to 13 feet in 10 years ). The culms can reach up to 0.5 inches across.
This Bamboo is similar to P. viridistriatus but with narrow leaves.
Hardy to -13 F and grows well in shade to partial shade.


Pleioblastus simonii ( Simon's Bamboo )

Native to China and Japan and reaching up to 20 feet in height with canes up to 1.5 inches in diameter. This Bamboo is dense and upright in habit, making it good for windbreaks and screens. Very old clumps can be up to 50 feet across.
It shoots very late in spring and its leaves are up to 10 x 1 inches in size. It shoots throughout the summer and even into fall.
Hardy to 0 F. Not very attractive or ornamental. Semi clump forming and only slightly invasive. Thrives in sun to partial shade. Tolerant of salt and even moderate drought.

Pleioblastus variegatus ( Fortune Bamboo )
A spreading and thicket forming Bamboo reaching a maximum size of 8 x 7 ( rarely over 3 ) feet in height with leaves up to 8 x 1 inches, that are dark green and strongly striped and broadly-margined white.
The canes are up to 0.25 inches in diameter.
Hardy zones 6 to 10. This attractive Bamboo is hardy -10 F but looses its leaves at 0 F. Prefers shade to partial shade. Cut back to near ground in late winter.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier nursery

* photo taken on Aug 21 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park


* photos taken on Aug 3 2014 @ Natonal Zoo, Washington, DC


* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014



Pleioblastus viridistriatus ( Kamuro Bamboo )
Reaching up to 6 ( rarely over 3 ) x 4 feet with canes up to 0.5 inches in diameter; this Bamboo forms a striking ornamental, dense groundcover. It is native to Japan.
Its leaves, up to 9 x 2 inches in size, are green and intensely striped yellow.
Hardy to -15 F in shade to partial shade. Looks best if cut to ground during early spring.

* photos taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD







PSEUDOSASA

A group of attractive running Bamboos

Pseudosasa amabilis ( Tonkin Cane Bamboo )
A native of southern China having strong canes up to 50 feet in height with canes up to 2.5 inches across. Slow to establish.
Likes heat and is hardy to 10 F.

Pseudosasa cantori

Another native of southern China having strong canes and reaching up to 16 feet in height with canes up to 1.3 inches in diameter.
Hardy to 10 F

Pseudosasa japonica ( Arrow Bamboo )
Vigorous growing and reaching up to 20 x 20 feet with canes up to 1 inch in diameter; this Bamboo is either used as a clump or hedge. Excellent for screening. It may look wild and unkempt without pruning as it can retain dead material.
Arrow Bamboo is native to Japan and South Korea.
Its leaves are large up to 12 and sometimes up to 20 inches in length and 1.5 inches in width. The foliage is deep green.
Hardy north to zone 6b ( tolerating as low as -15 F ) in full sun to partial shade. Tolerant of salt wind.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier nursery

* photos taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, Washington, DC





* photos taken on Nov 11 2014 in Columbia, MD



* historic archive photo


'Akebonosuji'
leaves heavily variegated yellow

'Tsutsumiana' ( Green Onion Bamboo )
Reaches up to 18 inches with canes up to 0.65 inches wide that are swollen at the internodes. The deep green leaves are about the same size.
Hardy zones 6 to 9. Salt tolerant.

Pseudosasa owatarii
Native to southern Japan; this Bamboo forms an extremely attractive dwarf groundcover reaching up to 3 feet in height but often only a few inches. Foliage is lush dark green.

Pseudosasa pleioblastoides
Very similar to P. japonica but more upright and only reaching up to 12 feet in height. The very luxuriant foliage is smaller than P japonica.
Hardy to -10 F.

QUINGHUEA

Qiongzhuea timidi
Endangered in its native China and very rare in cultivation though it grows very well in the British Isles as well as the Pacific Northwest region of North America. This Bamboo wasn't even discovered until 1980. It thrives in the conditions of high rainfall & humidity, part shade and acid soils. It is vigorous and extremely fast running forming dense thickets. A very attractive ornamental Bamboo with intensely lush green canes and smooth very swollen deep purple nodes. Reaching up to 20 feet in height with canes up to 1.3 inches in diameter; it shoots new growth in the spring and is hardy to 5 F

SASA

Forest Bamboos for the shade, preferring moist, well drained soil and light to deep shade.

* photo taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, DC


Sasa borealis
Native to northern Japan and Korea; this Bamboo can reach up to 10 feet in height with stems up to 0.3 inches in diameter.
Hardy to -10 F and prefers full shade.

Sasa kamagama
Reaching up to 6 feet in height with stems up to 0.2 inches in diameter; this Bamboo has very large leaves to 12 x 2.5 inches in size.
Hardy to 0 F

'Yoshinoi'
from Japan; this cultivar only grows to 2 feet tall. A great groundcover; is best mowed to ground in early spring for a fresh clean appearance.
Prefers full shade.

Sasa kirilensis
Native to eastern Russia, Korea as well as cold, wet and snowy Sakhalin Island. This vigorous growing Bamboo grows to 10 feet in height with stems up to 0.8 inches in diameter.
Its foliage is large to 12 x 3 inches.
It is hardy down to -10 F ( root hardy to -22 F ) and hates hot dry sites.
An excellent tall groundcover that is easy to grow on cool shady to partial shady sites.

'Simofuri' ( Frosty Bamboo )
outstanding white leaf variegation
on a plant reaching up to 6.5 feet in height.

Sasa oshidensis
A vigorous shrub Bamboo growing to 6 feet in height with stems up to 0.3 inches in diamether.
It is the most heat tolerant of the Sasa's but is only cold hardy to 0 F

Sasa palmata ( Palmate Bamboo )
A tropical looking but cold hardy evergreen Bamboo can reach 13 feet in height with canes up to 0.5 inches in diameter. A single plant can spread up to 20 feet in just 10 years. Native to mountains of Japan where it covers vast lands.
It has very large leathery leaves up to 15 x 4 inches in size. The foliage is bright green, later turning to deep green. Canes are glaucous blue-green in color. Hardy to zone 5 ( root hardy to -22 F ) and potentially very invasive without root barriers. Thrives in cool shady locations and looks great by the water. Reduce vigor by cutting to ground in March.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Aug 17 2012 in Baltimore Co., MD


* historical archive photos




'Kuma-Zaza'
Lower growing, only reaching a maximum height of 5 feet with stems up to 0.5 inches across. The leaves are green becoming variegated with a white margin as the season progresses.
Hardy to -4 F in partial to full shade.

Sasa quelpartensis
A slow growing groundcover Bamboo, reaching only up to 1 foot in height.
It is hardy to -22 F and very shade tolerant.

Sasa senansis
- is like Sasa palmata but its attractive large 14 inch deep green evergreen ( to -20 F ) leathery leaves are hairy below. It is invasive, tolorates deep shade and grows to 10 feet tall with canes up to 0.7 inches in diameter.
It is hardy north to zone 5 or even zones 3 and 4 if sheltered. Grows well in partial shade to deep shade even under Norway Maples. Excellent for tough sites.

Sasa tesselata
A moderate spreaing Bamboo, reaching up to 6 feet tall with a stem diamter of 0.5 inches, that is native to Japan.
The very large leaves, up to 24 x 4 inches in size, are deep green.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( tolerating as low as 0 F ) in full sun to partial shade.

Sasa tsuboiana
Similar to Sasa palmata but is clumping and not invasive. Reaching up to 6 feet in height with canes up to 0.5 inches in diameter and is not invasive. The handsome dense foliage is deep green. The leaves are up to 10 x 2 inches in size.
Hardy zones 4b to 8 ( tolerating as low as -25 F ) in partial to full shade.

Sasa veitchii ( Kuma Grass Bamboo )
A beautiful but aggressive spreading bamboo reaching up to 32 feet in spread while only up to 6 feet in height. It is native to Japan.
The ovate leaves, up to 10 x 2.5 inches, are glossy dark green boldly edged with white.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( tolerating -20 F ) and prefers cool summers. Reduce vigor by cutting to ground in spring. This extremely invasive Bamboo can produce up to 18 tons of bio mass per acre. It is native to Japan.

* photo taken on Apr 6 2013 in Burtonsville, MD


'Minor'
Only reaches up to 2 feet in height with more narrow leaves to 6 x 1.5 inches.
An excellent shade groundcover hardy to -20 F

SASAELLA

Similar to Sasa Bamboos and also preferring shade.

Sasaella bitchuensis
Native to Japan reaching up to 6 feet with canes up to 0.2 inches in diameter.
Hardy to 0 F and best in full shade.

Sasaella hidaensis
An attractive small leafed green groundcover from Japan that can reach up to 6 feet in height with canes up to 0.2 inches in diameter.
Prefers part shade and is hardy to 0 F.

Sasaella masamuneana
A vigorous spreading Bamboo, reaching up to 7 ( rarely over 6 ) feet with canes up to 0.25 inches across. The thick, glossy deep green leaves are up to 8 x 0.5 inches.
Prefers partial shade ( survives in sun or shade ) and is hardy zones 5 to 9 ( tolerating at least down to -15 F ). A tough and attractive groundcover.

* photo of unknown internet source


* photos taken on Oct 11 2013 in Harford Co., MD



'Albostriata'
An attractive vigorous Bamboo reaching the same size with leathery leaves that are deep green and heavily striped creamy-white.

'Aureostriata'
also very attractive and vigorous with leathery leaves that are heavily golden yellow variegated.

Sasaella ramosa ( Pygmy Sasa )
Also called Sasa pygmaea. At most reaching up to 6.5 feet tall with stems up to 0.3 inches wide; it is often only 1.5 feet tall making it an excellent low groundcover.
It is also useful for erosion control over large areas. In the right climate is can be a very aggressive runner and even be invasive, spreading up to 20 feet in 10 years.
The attractive broad leaves, up to 6 x 0.8 inches, are green with white hairs.
The foliage is dense and luxuriant.
Hardy to -22 F in sun or shade.

Sasa sasakiana
Reaching up to 10 feet in height with stems up to 0.4 inches across.
This Bamboo is best in full sun and is hardy to 0 F.

Sasa shiobarensis
This green groundcover from Japan reaches up to 6 feet in height with stems up to 0.3 inches in diameter but is often lower.
Best in partial shade and hardy to 0 F

SEMIARUNDINARIA

Semiarundinaria fastuosa ( Temple Bamboo )
Native to Japan; this ornamental, columnar Bamboo reaches up to 40 feet in height with stems up to 2.5 inches in diameter. Clumps can spread up to 10 feet in 10 years.
The narrow leaves are up to 10 x 1.5 inches in size. The foliage is glossy deep green.
Its dark green canes eventually turn brick red.
A dense narrow screen can be made by shearing back its branches making it denser. This Bamboo is not aggressive and is tolerant of salt air and alkaline soil.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 ( tolerating as low as -20 F ) in full sun to partial shade.
Tolerant of salty air.

* historical archive photo


'Viridis'
canes up to 2 inches in diameter stay intense emerald green.
Hardy to -15 F

Semiarundinaria fortis
A rare native of Japan reaching up to 26 feet in height with canes up to 1.5 inches in diameter.
Hardy to 0 F

Semiarundinaria kamamiana
Similar to S. fastuosa reaching up to 34 feet in height with upright green aging to purple canes up to 1.5 inches in diameter. Its canes are green later turning to purple.
A very tough, hardy Bamboo, hardy from zones 7a to 10 tolerating as low as -4 F

Semiarundinaria lubrica
A slow spreading, dense, upright Chinese native, reaching a maximum height of 20 feet, with deep green culms. Makes a great specimen or screen.
Hardy to -7 F in sun or partial shade.

Semiarundinaria makinoi
Vigorous in habit, reaching up to 10 feet with upright culms that are green aging to red.
Hardy to -7 F

Semiarundinaria okuboi
Vigorous and upright in habit, reaching up to 14 feet with canes that are green aging to yellow. Great for screening.
Hardy to 0 F.

Semiarundinaria yashadake 'kimmei'
A non-invasive, upright, dense Bamboo, reaching a maximum height of 25 feet, with golden culms up to 1.6 inches across.
The leaves, up to 5.5 x 0.5 inches across, are luxuriant deep green.
Hardy to -8 F in sun or partial shade.

SHIBATAEA

A family of hardy Bamboos that prefers partial shade

Shibataea chinensis
Native to China and reaching up to 2 feet in height with canes of 0.2 inches diameter. It prefers moderately alkaline soil and is hardy to -5 F

Shibataea kumasaca ( Ruscus-Leaf Bamboo )
Native to Japan and reaching up to 8 feet in height with zig zag flattened canes up to 0.3 inches in diameter. It is compact, non invasive and clump forming with leaves up to 4 x 1 inch. The foliage is glossy and very deep green. This Bamboo can be used as a sheared hedge. It looks expecially good when planted under Redwoods.
It is a great groundcover that is attractive and moderate spreading. Needs very acid soil and is hardy to -20 F. Best in shade to partial shade ( tolerates sun ) on a sheltered moist site.

Shibataea lanceolata
Similar to S. kumasaca but with much longer and narrower leaves

Thamnocalamus crassinodus
A clumping Bamboo reaching up to 18 ( rarely over 12 ) feet in height with blue-gray canes up to 0.7 inches in diameter that is native to the high mountains of the Himalayas. The small foliage ( up to 2.5 x 0.2 inches ) is fine in appearance. Best in partial shade to shade and is hardy to -10 F

'Kew Beauty'
Similar but very dense with arching habit.

Thamnocalamus spathiflorus
This slow growing, clumping Bamboo is native to subalpine forests in the high elevations of the Himalayas from northern India & Nepal to Tibet. It reaches up to 18 ( rarely over 12 ) feet in height with culms up to 0.8 inches wide. Some records include: 10 years - 6 feet.
The lance-shaped leaves are up to 3.5 x 0.3 inches in size. The foliage is bright green.
Hardy zones 5 to 7.

Thamnocalamus tessellatus
An upright clumping Bamboo native to mountains of South Africa reaching up to 16 feet in height with canes up to an inch in diameter. Very erect canes that have a light blue hue turning deep green in full sun. It is the only Bamboo native to South Africa.
The leaves are up to 3 x 0.4 inches.
Hardy to -5 F. Prefers full sun or partial shade. It is wind tolerant and more drought tolerant than most Bamboo making for a great windbreak.

Yushania anceps ( Jaunsar Bamboo )
A very vertical, non-invasive, moderate spreading ( spread up to 10 feet in 10 years ) Bamboo, reaching up to 16 feet in height, with culms up to 0.6 inches across. The culms are glaucous green at first, later turning to glossy yellow-green. It is native to very high elevations in the Himalayas.
The attractive willowy, lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 x 0.5 inches, are glossy deep green. The canes are glossy green.
Hardy to 0 F in full sun to partial shade. Tolerant of deeper shade and heavy root competition.

Yushania chungii
An open but not spreading Chinese native Bamboo, reaching up to 8 feet.
Hardy to -4 F

Yushania maculata
A very vertical, non-invasive ( spread up to 8 feet in 10 years ) Bamboo, reaching up to 16 feet in height, with upright culms up to 0.6 inches across. The culms are blue-gray at first, later turning to deep green.
The willowy, lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 x 0.5 inches, are glossy deep green.
Hardy to -4 F in full sun to partial shade.

4 comments:

  1. Oh my goodness - all that choice!
    I'm extending my Japanese garden and am now able to have some larger bamboo, but I had NO idea that there was quite so much variety!

    Thank you for such a fascinating and informative post.

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  2. Welcome! Just added a few more Bamboo entries

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  3. What a great post, your blog is so thorough and indeed fascinating. I'm researching tree fodder options for horses and Bamboo is one of the edible species - although not a tree it is perennial and grows nice and big + providing shade and shelter while also being quite nutritious for horses. :)

    Do you perhaps know which other tree species are good at providing fodder for horses (non-toxic + favoured by horses that have access to grass grazing)? I'm looking specifically for evergreen trees/ large shrubs that grow fast enough to provide more than just a 1 month supplement to horses' diet.

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  4. Thank you! I have not seen much info regarding bamboo as horse fodder online however the general consensus seems to be that it is hard to them to digest.

    ReplyDelete