Saturday, February 20, 2010

Spiderwort

Tradescantia

A small genus of summer flowering perennial plants with broad grassy foliage that are native to North America. They can be propagated from seed, division, and even cuttings. Dividing is recommended during early to mid autumn and replanted at same depth with bone meal dusted in the well prepared planting hole to aid rapid establishment.
Spidorworts grow very fast and make great low maintenance landscape plants with exception of very favorable sites where it may become a pest.

* photos taken on June 1 2010 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


Tradescantia occidentalis ( Western Spiderwort )
A perennial, native central North America from southeast Alberta to near Saskatoon, Saskatchewan to southwestern Manitoba; south to Arizona to Louisiana. It is critically endangered in Canada due to land conversion to agriculture. It is usually found on sand dunes in the wild.
The linear leaves, up to 11 inches in length, are bright blue-green.
The deep purple ( rarely pink or white ) flowers, up to 1.2 inches wide, appear during early summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil.

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Tradescantia ohioensis ( Ohio Spiderwport )
A very tough, vigorous perennial, forming a clump up to 4 x 4 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, that is native to rich acidic oak-savanna and prairies in eastern North America ( from western Kansas to central Nebraska to central Minnesota to central Michigan to southern Ontario to Massachussetts and southern New Hampshire; south to central Texas to southern Florida ). It is endangered in New Hampshire and Ontario where it still occurs at the Ojibway Prairie in Windsor. It generally goes dormant during late summer if dry.
The narrow lance-shaped, semi-evergreen leaves, up to 20 x 2 inches, are blue-green, turning to deep burgundy-red during winter.
The white and blue flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne in clusters from mid-spring to early autumn.
Its rhizomes are very tough and may even grow into blacktop.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on fertile, moist soil. Tolerant of heat, drought and tree root competition.
Can be cut to ground after blooming, to encourage fresh clump of foliage. Not eaten by deer.

* photo taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore



* photo taken on May 8 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 14 2013 in Howard Co., MD


'Mrs Loewer'
Reaches up to 2.5 feet with glossy green foliage and purple flowers.

Tradescantia pinetorium
Full text description coming soon.

Tradescantia virginiana ( Virginia Spiderwort )
A very tough, vigorous to invasive spreading perennial, forming a grassy upright clump up to 3.2 x 5 feet, that is native to rich woods in the southeast U.S. ( from central Iowa to central Wisconsin to central Michigan to Vermont; south to Missouri to northwest Georgia ). It is endangered in Canada, Wisconsin, Michigan, Delaware, the Carolinas, Arkansas and Louisiana; extinct in Iowa. During the 1800s; it was considered abundant on the Ohio shore but absent from Windsor/Essex County, Ontario.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves, up to 18 x 1.5 inches in size, are deep green.
The leaves are edible and can be eaten as a potherb.
The purple flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne in clusters during the late spring to late summer ( though often taking a rest from blooming during summer heat/drought ).
Its rhizomes are very tough and may even grow into blacktop.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist, well drained soil. Flood tolerant.
Can be cut to 4 inches from the ground after blooming, to encourage fresh clump of foliage and often even repeat autumn bloom. Not eaten by deer.

* photo taken on May 15 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 1 2014 in Columbia, MD


Cultivars and hybrids ( often known as Tradescantia x andersoniana )

'Barbel'
Reaches up to 2 x 4 feet with blue flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, borne from late spring to mid summer.

'Bilberry Ice'
Forms a compact clump, up to 20 inches x 2 feet, with luxuriant blue-green foliage and white flowers splashed lavender. The flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne early summer to early autumn.
Drought tolerant.

* photo taken on May 7 2014 in Elkridge, MD

* photo taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA

* photos taken on May 28 2017 in Howard Co., MD


'Charlotte'
Flowers are clear pink.

'Concord Grape'
Forms a compact, vigorous, long lived clump, up to 2 x 3 feet with attractive blue-green foliage.
The deep purple flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne over a long season and often reblooming during autumn.


* photo taken on May 14 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 14 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 15 2013 in Howard Co., MD


'Hawaiian Punch'
Forms a vigorous, dense clump, up to 2 x 4 feet, with attractive green foliage and reddish-purple flowers borne over a long season.

* photo taken on May 28 2017 in Howard Co., MD


'Innocence'
White flowers, up to 2 inches across, and bright green foliage; otherwise similar to species.

'Isis'
The flowers, up to 3 inches across, are white with violet-blue flushing in the center. They are borne early summer to early autumn on a plant reaching up to 2 feet in height.
Foliage is mid-green.

'Little Doll'
Forms a vigorous low compact clump, up to 20 inches x 4 feet. Excellent for use as edging. The narrow foliage is bright green.
The light blue flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, are borne during late spring then sporadically into autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, it is unfortunately much more prone to leaf spot than most species.

'Purple Dome'
Deep purple flowers and green foliage; otherwise similar to species.

'Red Grape'
A compact form, forming a clump up to 2 x 3 feet, with luxuriant blue-green foliage. The abundant bright reddish-violet flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are borne over a long season beginning during early summer.
Drought tolerant.

* photo of unknown internet source


'Rubra'
The flowers. up to 1.5 inches wide, are deep red to violet-red, otherwise similar to species.

'Snowcap'
Forms a clump, up to 2 x 2.7 feet with thick green foliage and large, pure white flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, borne early to mid summer.

* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on May 14 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 28 2017 in Howard Co., MD

* historic archive photo


'Sweet Kate'
Forms a very attractive, vigorous clump, up to 2 x 4 feet, composed of clear yellow leaves, up to 12 x 1 inches in size.
The deep bluish-purple flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne early summer until autumn frost.
An excellent plant for brightening up a shady spot.

* photo taken on May 16 2011 in Washington, D.C.

* photo taken on May 17 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 14 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 20 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario

* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photos taken on May 10 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 3 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


'Zwanenburg Blue'
Forms a clump up to 2.5 x 4 feet. The flowers, up to 3 inches across, are cleaner deep blue and much larger than that of the species.
The foliage is mid-green.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

* photo taken on June 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

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