Saturday, October 8, 2016

Rush

Scirpus

* photo taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, Ontario

* photos taken on Sep 18 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD


Scirpus americanus
Also called Scirpus pungens. Reaches up to 4 feet in height. It is native to central and eastern North America ( from Saskatchewan to Newfoundland; south to Kansas to Louisiana to south Florida ). It was abundant at Detroit, Michigan during the 1800s.
Thrives in full sun on moist to swampy sites.

Scirpus atrovirens ( Black Bulrush )
A clumping perennial, reaching up to 6 feet. It was abundant at Detroit, Michigan as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
Thrives in full sun on wet to swampy sites.

Scirpus cyperinus ( Woolgrass )
A broad-spreading, clumping perennial, reaching up to 5 feet, that is native to most of central & eastern U.S. from Manitoba to Newfoundland and south. It is a widespread native of North America ( from Vancouver, British Columbia to Grande Cache, Alberta to Lake Athabasca, Saskatchewan to Prince Albert, Sask. to central Manitoba to Moosonee, Ontario to Gaspe region of Quebec to Newfoundland; south to central Oregon to western South Dakota to central Florida ). It is found in freshwater marshes and swamps in the wild where it often forms large colonies.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, thriving in full sun on moist to wet sites.

* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

'Leaf River Selection'

* Photos courtesy of USDA NRCS.

Scirpus tabernaemontana ( Bulrush )
A slow rhizome spreading, clumping perennial, reaching up to 10 x 7.5 ( rarely over 6 ) feet in size, that is native to marshland in most of Eurasia, northern Africa and North America ( from central Alaska to central Yukon to southwest Northwest Territories to Sandy Lake, Ontario to Moosonee, Ontario to Labrador & Newfoundland and south through most of the U.S.).
The very architectural stems are extremely vertical. They are luxuriant mid-green.
The tiny brown flowers are borne during early summer.
Hardy zones 1 to 9 in full sun in acidic to neutral, wet soil to shallow water. It can become invasive on some sites where it is best grown in containers. Propagation is from division during early spring.

* photo taken on Sep 15 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Sep 18 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD


'Albescens'
A vaariegated form, reaching only up to 3.5 feet in height.
It looks great at the edge of ponds.

'Zebrinus' ( Zebra Rush )
A perennial rush, reaching up to 6 ( usually under 3 ) feet with foliage that is deep gray-green and creamy-white banded.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 on moist to wet soil.

Scirpus validus ( Great Bulrush )
Also called S. tabernaemontana & Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani. A fast spreading rush, reaching up to 10 ( rarely over 6 ) x 3 feet and is native to swamps as well as fresh or bracken water marshes in North America ( from British Columbia to Haliburton, Ontario to Quebec to Newfoundland; south to Oklahoma to Louisiana to Georgia ). It can be found in water up to 16 inche deep and can spread rapidly.
The grassy foliage is bright green.
The seeds are of excellent food value for wildlife.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun on wet to swampy sites. Salt tolerant. The roots can be harvested during fall and winter and eaten as a vegetable or made into flour. New shoots can be peeled and eaten raw or boiled.

* photos taken by Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

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