Friday, March 12, 2010

Campsis - Trumpet Vine

A small genus of deciduous, long lived vines that are part of the larger Bignoniaceae family.
The flowers are followed by seedpods, up to 5 inches in length, that persist through the winter. The Trumpet Vines can be used as a wall cover or screen on a fence, and are excellent for attracting hummingbirds and butterflies. The Trumpet Vines often bloom all summer long.
They are easy to grow in full sun to partial shade on any well drained soil including clay. They are drought tolerant and too much water during summer may encourage excessive growth at expense of flowering. During drought, they should only get an occasional deep watering. The Trumpet Vines are rarely bothered by pests, disease, rabbits or deer. Adding bonemeal to soil during spring will help encourage blooming. Trumpet Vines love hot humid summers, and in cool summer climates such as the British Isles, they must be planted in a warm, sunny site protected from wind to get a worthwhile display of blooms.
Propagation is from seed or with cultivars, from semi-ripe cuttings taken in summer or root cuttings. Cut back to 6 inches in height when planting and plant deep to encourage new growth.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on June 25 2015 in Columbia, MD


Campsis grandiflora ( Chinese Trumpet Vine )
Shorter in stature, reaching a maximum vining height of 50 feet, though rarely exceeding 20 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10 feet.
Very long lived, these vines can exceed 100 years. Native to China and Japan, the Chinese Trumpet Vine is not a self aerial rooter and needs support such as a trellis to climb.
The pinnate leaves, up to 12 inches in length, are composed of 7 to 9 toothed, ovate leaflets. The foliage is deep green.
It has striking orange-red flowers that are much larger ( up to 4 inches across ) than Campsis radicans.
Hardy zone 7 to 9, Korean seed source should be hardy north to zone 6.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


'Morning Calm'
Showy orange-red flowers.
Zones 6 +, of hardy Korean origin.

* photos taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Campsis radicans ( American Trumpet Vine )
A very fast growing, very large vine native to sandy woodlands and floodplains in eastern North America ( from Nebraska to southern Wisconsin to central Michigan to southern Ontario to Pennsylvania & New Jersey; south to central Texas to central Florida ). It is endangered in the wild in Canada, being most abundantly found around Leamington, Point Pelee, Pelee Island and formerly around Chatham. It was also abundant on the Ohio shore during the 1800s and still is fairly abundant there. The American Trumpet Vine climbs with its aerial roots which attach to tree trunks and brick. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10+ feet; largest on record - 153 foot vining height with 6 inch trunk diameter. With average growing conditions; it is generally much smaller and can be pruned to even smaller size.
The pinnate leaves, up to 12 inches in length, are composed of 7 to 11 toothed, ovate leaflets, up to 4 inches in length. The foliage is deep green lightening to yellow or yellow-green during autumn.
The scarlet-red, trumpet-shaped flowers, up to 4 inches in length, are borne early summer. The flowers are borne in terminal clusters of 4 to 12.
They are followed by seedpods, up to 5 inches in length, that persist through the winter.
Hardy zones 4 to 9; in Ontario, it is hardy to far far north as Ottawa. At the northern fringes of its range, a severe winter may cause severe dieback - just cut to near groundlevel in early spring and it most certainly will grow back and FAST!

* photos taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photo taken on July 22 2015 in Belle River, ON

* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

* photo of unknown internet source






* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photos taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken on Sep 18 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* historical archive photo


'Crimson Trumpet'
Very vigorous with deep red flowers.

'Flamenco'
Very vigorous with deep green foliage and large, intense orangish-red ( with orange throat ) flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne during late summer into early autumn.

* photos taken on Aug 3 2012 @ University of Western Ontario, London, ON

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


'Flava'
Rich green foliage that turns attractive golden-yellow during autumn.
The flowers are brilliant bright yellow.

* photo taken on July 26 2015 @ Niagara Parks Bot. Gardens, Niagara Falls, ON


'Gabor'
Very large, deep red flowers, up to 4 inches in length. It is otherwise identical to the species.

'Red Sunset'
Very abundant, very intense red flowers; otherwise similar.

'Summer Snowfall'
Foliage is intensely marbled with white.
The flowers are orangish-red.
Hardy zones 5 to 9.

* photos taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


Campsis x tagliabuana ( Hybrid Trumpet Vine )
The very showy hybrid between Campsis grandiflora & C. radicans; is a very fast growing vine reaching up to 40 feet in height and growing at rates up to 10 feet per year.
The leaves, up to 12 x 6 ( rarely 18 ) inches in length, are similar to that of Campsis radicans. The luxuriant, thick, tropical-looking foliage and profuse scarlet flowers, up to 3 inches in length, make this a spectacular vine for the landscape. The flowers are borne on hanging clusters all summer long.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( 5 on protected sites only )

'Indian Summer'
Abundant, intense orange flowers.
The atractive, deep green foliage is often tinged deep red on the margins.
Hardier, north to zone 4.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


'Madame Galen'
Very large, salmon-red flowers, up to 3 x 3.2 inches in size; otherwise identical.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


'Madame Rose'
Flowers are rosy-red; otherwise identical.

Bignonia capreolata ( Cross Vine )
An attractive, very fast growing, leaf-tendril clinging, evergreen vine, reaching a maximum height of 100 ( average is 33 ) feet, that is native to the southeast U.S. ( Missouri to southern Illinois to Maryland; south to eastern Texas to central Florida ). It is usually found on floodplains and sandy open woodlands in the wild. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 20 feet. It looks great climbing on trellises and fences.
The leaves are divided into 2 oblong leaflets, up to 7.5 x 3 inches in size. The glossy deep green foliage turns to red to reddish-purple in autumn.
The abundant, orange-red, tubular flowers, up to 2 x 1 inches in length, are borne in clusters during late spring.
They are followed by pods, up to 7 inches in length, during autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 ( 5 as a perennial with deep mulch ) in full sun to partial shade on fertile, well drained soil. Cross Vine prefers a site protected from excessive wind but is moderately salt tolerant. It is extremely heat tolerant, even thriving in Phoenix, Arizona. Cut back a few feet during early spring to promote strong flowering shoots. In zone 6 if will usually freeze back to the ground during winter but resprouts during spring if deeply mulched and planted on a protected site. Propagation is from layering during winter or stem cuttings taken during summer or fall.

* photo taken on Aug 30 2012 in Howard Co., MD

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken on May 16 2012 in Howard Co., MD
* photos taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on May 20 2016 in Columbia, MD


var 'atrosanguinea'
Deep red flowers, otherwise identical.

'Tangerine Beauty'
Intense orange flowers.

Distictis buccinatoria ( Mexican Blood Flower )
A fast growing, woody, tendril-climbing, evergreen vine, reaching a maximum size of 50 x 30 feet, that is native to Mexico. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 20 feet.
The pointed, oval leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are smooth mid-green.
The intense deep rose-red, funnel-shaped flowers, up to 4 inches, are borne in clusters from early spring well into summer.
Hardy zones 10 to 11 in full sun on moist, fertile, humus-rich soil. It is stem hardy to 25 F and root hardy to 10 F if heavily mulched.
Cut back hard when first planted. Propagation is from semi-ripe cuttings taken during late summer or softwood cuttings taken during early summer.

Eccremocarpus scaber ( Chilean Glory Bower )
A fast growing, tendril climing, evergreen shrubby vine, reaching up to 17 feet, that is native to the High Andes mountains in Chile. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 16 feet.
The pinnate leaves are composed of toothed, heart-shaped leaflets.
The foliage is mid-green.
The orange-red, tubular flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are borne on racemes from early summer into autumn.
They are followed by inflated pods, up to 1.5 inches in length.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 in full sun on fertile, well drained soil.
If will dieback during winter in zone 8 but will resprout from the roots during spring if the plant is mulched. Deeply mulched plants on a protected site may survive as low as 0 F.
Propagation is from seed sown during spring.

'Coccineus'
Deep orange-red flowers contrasts with deep green foliage.

'Roseus'
Pink flowers.

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