Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Rudbeckia

A genus of perennials native to North America that are part of the larger Daisy family.
Rudbeckias attract hummingbirds and butterflies and are NOT eaten by deer.Rudbeckia's mostly prefer full sun.
Pinching plants during early summer will encourage shorter denser growth.
Deadheading from the beginning of the flowering season will encourage continuous bloom. Perennial species can be divided during autumn.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


Rudbeckia auriculata ( Eared Black Eye Susan )
A perennial, reaching up to 10 x 4 + ( rarely over 6 ) feet, that is native to the southeastern U.S. ( from southeastern Alabama to southern Georgia; south to northern Florida ). It is nearly extinct in the wild, the use of this plant in horticulture is important to its continuing survival.
The large, elliptical leaves, up to 26 x 8 inches, are green.
The golden-orange flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne on clusters during late summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 ( possibly 6 ) in full sun on moist, well drained soil.

Rudbeckia fulgida ( Black Eyed Susan )
A fast growing, long lived, rhizomatous perennial, forming a clump up to 4 x 5 feet, that is native to moist prairies, open woodlands and swamps in the eastern U.S. ( from southeast Wisconsin to southern Michigan to Essex County, Ontario to Connecticut; south to eastern Texas to far northern Florida ). A disjunct population is known from Red Bay on the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario. The Black Eyed Susan is popular in landscaping and is the state flower of Maryland. It is endangered in Canada.
The ovate leaves, up to 8 x 3 inches in size, are glossy deep green.
The golden-yellow flowers ( with dark brown eye ), up to 3.2 inches across, are borne mid-summer until mid-autumn if old blooms are removed to prolong blooming season. The flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. Very clay tolerant and also drought tolerant once established..


* photos of unknown internet source


* photos taken on July 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON


'Deamii'
Vigorous growing, reaching the same size as the species with toothed, oblong, hairy, mid-green foliage and golden-yellow flowers ( with dark eyes ), up to 4 inches across.

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Early Bird Gold'
An upright, sturdy perennial, reaching up to 2 x 3.4 feet in size, that was discovered in a field of 'Goldsturm at Dupont Nursery in Louisiana. Shorter in stature, it more readily spreads than 'Goldsturm'.
The golden-yellow flowers appear on average 2 months earlier than 'Goldsturm' and this flowering machine continues 2 months later in autumn as well.

* photo taken on Aug 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario


var sullivantii 'Goldsturm'
A very fast growing perennial, reaching up to 4 x 4 feet ( very rarely 5 feet ), with rhizomes forming large clumps in as little as 2 years on loose soil. Looks great with ornamental grasses, Black Lace Elderberry, Globe Thistle, Blue Salvias, Joe Pye Weed and Blue Veronicas.
The narrow-petalled, golden-yellow flowers ( with black eyes ), up to 5 inches across, are borne mid summer into early autumn. It unfortunately has a shorter bloom season than Rudbeckia fulgida var fulgida. Cut back after flowering to prevent fungal problems.

* photos taken on July 15 2010 in Columbia, MD




* photos taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario



* photo taken on July 17 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photos taken on Aug 4 2012 in Goderich, Ontario

* photos taken on Aug 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 23 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Jul 12 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

* photo taken on Aug 11 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 14 2016 in Columbia, MD


'Pot of Gold'
Similar to 'Goldsturm' but dwarf ( supposedly though has been known to reach 3 x 3.5 feet - rarely over 2 x 2 feet ).

* photo taken on July 13 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 19 2016 in Howard Co., MD


'Speciosa'
Reaches up to 5 feet ( typically closer to 3 feet ) with orange flowers ( with black eyes ), up to 4 inches across, borne early summer to mid-autumn. Tolerates moist shady sites.

'Viette's Little Suzy'
Compact in habit, reaching up to 16 inches x 3 feet, making it ideal for the small urban garden. It is also great for containers. It is a selection originating from Andre Viette Farm & Nursery.
The very abundant flowers are borne mid-summer to mid-autumn.
The foliage often turns to deep mahogany-red during autumn.

Rudbeckia grandiflora ( Rough Coneflower )
An upright perennial, reaching up to 5 x 3 feet, that is native to grasslands of central North America ( from central Oklahoma to eastern Kansas to southern Ontario; south to eastern Texas to Louisiana to northern Mississippi to Louisville, Kentucky ). It is endangered in Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Ontario, Ohio, Kentucky and Mississippi. It is not documented in the wild in Indiana however was most likely native to the tallgrass prairie pre 1900 before the prairie was tilled. It often forms colonies in the wild.
The leaves are elliptical in shape and deep green in color. The basal leaves are up to 14 x 4.5 inches and the stem leaves are up to 6 x 3 inches.
The flowers, up to 6.5 ( rarely over 4 ) inches across, consist of a large black cone that is surrounded by drooping bright yellow petals. The flowers are borne from mid summer to mid autumn or sometimes even later. The flowers attract butterflies.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun on just about any well drained soil. It is very drought tolerant.

'Sundance'
Reaches up to 4 x 3 feet, with flowers consisting of a large dark brown cone surrounded by drooping, bright yellow petals.

Rudbeckia hirta ( Annual Black Eyed Susan )
A biennial to short lived perennial, reaching up to 4 feet x 20 inches, that is native to sandy open woods in North America ( from southwestern British Columbia to central B.C. to Dauphin, Manitoba to Dryden, Ontario to Kakabeka Falls, Ontario to Newfoundland, south to California to Florida ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was considered abundant in southern Essex County as well as the Lake Erie islands and Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit, Michigan during presettlement era.
The toothed leaves are oblong to elliptical, up to 7 x 3 inches. The foliage is mid-green.
The narrow-petalled, bright yellow flowers ( with black center ), up to 6 inches across, are borne early summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil, very drought tolerant. Sow seed outdoors into permanent site during autumn or early spring.

* photos taken on July 13 2011 in Columbia, MD




* photos taken on July 1 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Autumn Color'
Vigorous in habit, reaching up to 2 feet in height. The huge flowers, up to 7 inches across, are deep red on the inside and rich golden-yellow towards the petal tips.
A self seeding biennial.

* photos taken on July 13 2011 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on Aug 2 2011 @ Hyde Park, NY



'Cherry Brandy'
Reaches up to 20 inches in height, with intense deep red flowers, up to 4 inches wide, borne all summer long.

'Double Gold'
Also called 'Double Gloriosa'. Reaches up to 3 feet with very showy, double, golden-yellow flowers, up to 4.3 inches across.

'Golden Jubilee'

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.


'Indian Summer'
Reaches up to 44 inches in height with large golden-yellow flowers with dark brown eyes borne mid summer into early autumn.

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario


'Irish Eyes'
Reaches up to 3 feet with single golden-yellow flowers, up to 5 inches wide, with green eyes.

* photo taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario


'Tiger Eye'
Compact and dense with sturdy stems, reaching up to 2 x 2 feet.
The deep brown eye is surrounded by deep golden-yellow petals. The flowers are up to 3 inches across.
A biennial that self seeds, it is more mildew resistant than most Rudbeckia hirta cultivars.

* photos taken on July 13 2011 in Columbia, MD




Rudbeckia laciniata ( Cut-leaf Coneflower )
A tall upright perennial, reaching up to 12 x 7 feet ( usually under 8 feet ), that can spread quickly underground. Cutleaf Coneflower is native to moist to wet woodlands in North America ( from western Montana to Manitoba to Chapleau, Ontario to Quebec to Nova Scotia; south to Arizona to northern Florida ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was locally common along the Detroit River, the Canard River valley as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The deeply-divided pinnate leaves, up to 16 inches in length, are composed of 7 leaflets. The foliage is bright green, turning to deep green. In mild climates, the basal leaves are evergreen.
The yellow flowers ( with green cone ), up to 6 inches across, are borne mid summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil. Wet soil tolerant. Prone to powdery mildew in some areas.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Aug 20 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


* photo taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC

* photo taken on Oct 23 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken by Douglas Ladd @ USDA SCS. 1989. Midwest wetland flora

* historic archive photo

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Golden Glow'
Reaching up to 8.5 ( rarely over 7 ) feet in height, forming a huge spreading patch in just a few years.
The double pompom flowers are bright yellow.
Prone to getting knocked over by high winds.

* photo taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario


'Goldquelle'
A perennial, forming a fast spreading clump reaching a maximum size of 7 x 7 feet, with double yellow flowers from mid summer into early autumn. It is long lived to over 10 years, and can be quite invasive on ideal sites.

* photos taken on August 4 2010 in Stratford, Ontario




Rudbeckia maxima ( Giant Coneflower )
An erect, rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 10 x 4 ( rarely over 8 ) feet, that is native to the southeastern U.S. ( from Oklahoma to most of Arkansas; south to Texas to Louisiana and also South Carolina ). It is endangered in Arkansas.
The large bold basal leaves, up to 36 x 12 inches ( usually under 24 x 10 inches ), are silvery-blue. Even if this plant never bloomed at all, the showy clump of basal leaves is an ornamental feature in itself.
The deep yellow flowers, up to 6 inches across, with very large brown cones, are borne mid summer into early autumn. The flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun on deep, fertile, moist, acidic soil. Drought tolerant. It is far hardier than most would expect considering its native range. Deer resistant.

* photo taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Sep 26 2013 in Baltimore Co., MD

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA

* photo taken by Carl Hunter @ USDA SCS. 1991. Southern wetland flora

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Rudbeckia mohrii ( Grassy Coneflower )
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 4.5 ( rarely over 3.5 ) feet in height, that is native to wet pine savannah and shallow marshland in Georgia and northern Florida where it is rare.
The entire, leathery, linear to narrow lance-shaped leaves, up to 16 x 0.6 inches, are blue-green.
The yellow flowers are borne during summer and fall.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on moist, sandy soil.

Rudbeckia nitida ( Shiny Coneflower )
A long lived, upright perennial, forming a massive clump reaching up to 7 x 4 feet. It is native to wet pine savanna in the southeastern U.S. ( from eastern Texas to central Georgia; south to central Florida ). It is endangered with extinction in the wild. It is extinct from Texas and Mississippi.
The very deeply-lobed, ovate leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are luxuriant deep green.
The yellow flowers, up to 4 inches across, are borne during mid to late summer. They are excellent for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds.
Hardy zones 2 to 9 on average to moist, fertile, well drained soil. It is very heat tolerant and also deer resistant.

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken by Mark A. Garland @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Herbstsonne' ( Autumn Sun Coneflower )
A huge, upright, vigorous, clump forming perennial, reaching up to 8 x 5 feet with sturdy stems bearing leaves, up to 10 x 2 inches. It looks great with tall ornamental grasses.
The single, golden-yellow "daisies" with drooping petals, are up to 5 inches across.
The huge flowers are borne from mid-summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun on fertile soil. Cutting back by half in early summer, plants will be more sturdy and about 2 feet shorter at bloom time.

Rudbeckia occidentalis ( Western Coneflower )
A perennial reaching up to 7 x 4 ( rarely over 5 ) feet, that is native to open woodlands in the western U.S. ( from Washington to Montana to central Wyoming, south to California to central Colorado ).
The toothed, pointed, oval leaves, up to 12 x 4 inches, are dull mid-green.
Unlike the other Coneflowers, this species has only a brown cone surrounded by a few green petals.
The flower heads are up to 5 ( rarely over 3 ) inches across.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Black Beauty'
A moderate growing, tall perennial, reaching up to 6 x 4 feet. The foliage is lush attractive gray-green and the flowers are golden-yellow with a tall black cone.
Hardy zones 2b to 8

Rudbeckia subtomentosa ( Sweet Coneflower )
A stiff stemmed, rhizomatous perennial reaching a maximum size of 6.5 x 3.3 ( rarely over 5 ) feet, that is native to open woods or moist to wet prairie in midwestern U.S. ( from eastern Kansas to southwest Iowa to southern Wisconsin to central Michigan; south to southwest Oklahoma to eastern Texas to Louisiana to northern Mississippi ). It is endangered in Michigan, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi and Texas.
The aromatic, ovate leaves are up to 12 x 4 inches in size. The foliage is luxuriant deep green.
The abundant, anise-scented flowers, up to 3.2 inches across, borne during late summer into mid-autumn, are clear yellow with blackish-brown centers. The flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 on average to moist soil. Very heat and humidity tolerant but will need a weekly deep watering if drought occurs. Deer resistant.

* photos taken on Aug 20 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD



* photo taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC


'Henry Eilers'
Vigorous in habit, reaching up to 5 x 4 feet; it is grown for it's unique quilled ( abundant very narrow petals ) flowers, up to 2 inches across. The abundant light yellow flowers are borne late summer into early autumn.
This cultivar was discovered in the wild on a prairie in Illinois by Henry Eilers.

* photo taken on Aug 20 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore, PA

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Rudbeckia triloba ( Brown-Eyed Susan )
A short-lived, rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 6.5 x 4 ( rarely over 5 ) feet, that is native to open woods ( from Nebraska to Minnesota to Wiarton, Ontario to southeast Quebec & Vermont; south to eastern Texas to northwest Florida to central North Carolina ). It is very rare and scattered in the Deep South. It is also endangered in Minnesota and Maryland. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was only known across Lake Erie on the Ohio shore ( especially at Port Clinton ) during the 1800s. It typically only lives 3 years but self sows.
The leaves, up to 12 x 3 ( rarely over 5 ) inches in length, are green.
The orange-yellow ( with black cones ) flowers, up to 3 inches across, are borne mid summer to late autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. Very soil tolerant as well as tolerant of heat and drought. Deer resistant.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* photo taken on Oct 1 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Sep 16 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD


'Prairie Flow'
Very vigorous, reaching up to 5 x 3 feet with profuse, orange to orange-red flowers, up to 2.5 inches across, with bright yellow petal tips. The flowers appear mid summer and the blooming season lasts over 3 months.
The stems are deep red.

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