Thursday, February 2, 2012

Angelica

Angelica

* photo of unknown internet source


Angelica amurensis ( Korean Angelica )
Also called Angelica cincta. A very large perennial, reaching up to 6.5 ( reported to be double that on Sakhalin ) feet in height, that is native to deciduous woodlands in far eastern Russia, northern China, Korea and Japan.
The divided leaves are 16 x 12 inches in size. The toothed ovate leaves are luxuriant mid-green.
The creamy-white flowers appear during mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in partial shade on moist soil.

Angelica archangelica ( Norwegian Angelica )
A spectacular large perennial, reaching a maximum size of 8 x 6 feet, that is native to Greenland, Iceland and northern Europe eastward to central Asia.
The huge bipinnate leaves, up to 3 feet in length, are composed of many toothed leaflets, up to 3 inches in length. The attractive foliage is bright green.
The white flowers are borne on spectacular clusters during mid-summer.
Flowering does not occur until the second year.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on moist, fertile soil. Remove the flower stalks immediately after blooming since if the plant is allowed to set seed it will usually then act as a biennial and die. Propagation is from seed sown immediately upon ripening.

Angelica atropurpurea ( Purple Angelica )
A spectacular large perennial, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 6.6 feet, that is native to riverbanks and moist to swampy woodlands in eastern North America ( from central Minnesota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Sauble Beach and Oliphant, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to central Iowa to central Indiana to Maryland...it also occurs further south in West Virginia and North Carolina in the Appalachian Mountains ). It is endangered in Maryland where it only occurs in Garrett County though likely once also occurs around the northern shores of Chesapeake Bay. It was considered to be abundant on the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It is usually grown as a focal point foliage plant. Be careful not to get the sap on bare skin, blisters can result in sun.
The huge, bipinnate leaves, up to 2 feet across, are deep green at first, later turning to green with red veining. The leaves are composed of toothed, ovate leaflets up to 4 x 3.2 inches in size.
The white flowers are borne on clusters, up to 12 ( rarely over 10 ) inches across, during early to mid summer.
The stems are deep purple. The stalks can be eaten like celery and actually taste similar.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on consistently moist soil. Remove the flower stalks immediately after blooming since if the plant is allowed to set seed it will usually then act as a biennial and die. It is almost never bothered by insect pests or disease.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Angelica dahurica ( Dahurian Angelica )
A short-lived perennial, reaching up to 10 feet, that is native to mountain meadows, riverbanks and woodland edge in northeast Asia ( from Siberia to Kamchatka; south to Mongolia, Manchuria, Korea and Japan ).
The compound leaves are up to 20 x 16 inches in size. The toothed, oblong leaflets are up to 4 x 1.6 inches in size.
The greenish-white flowers appear on huge umbels, up to 12 inches wide, during mid to late summer. It does not bloom until the second or third years. The purplish-green flower stalk can be up to 3 inches thick.
Hardy zones 2 to 6 in partial shade on moist, fertile soil.

Angelica gigas ( Korean Archangel )
A striking short-lived perennial, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 4 ( rarely over 6.5 ) feet, that is native to Manchuria, Korea and Japan.
The stunning, bold bipinnate leaves, up to 16 x 12 inches in size, are borne on dark purple stems. The leaflets are ovate to triangular. The foliage is purplish-green at first, turning to deep green.
The deep purplish-red flowers are borne on large umbels, up to 5 inches across, during late summer, often persisting until autumn frost.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist, fertile soil. Remove the flower stalks immediately after blooming since if the plant is allowed to set seed it will usually then act as a biennial and die. It is usually propagated from seed sown during spring. It is best to grow multiple plants around the garden and allow at least 1 to set seed to keep a continuous supply of this plant.


* photo taken by Milan Havlis ( havlis.cz )

* photos taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


* video found on Youtube


Angelica pachycarpa
A very impressive, long-lived perennial, reaching up to 4 x 3 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, that is native to Portugal and northwest Spain. It has naturalized in the New Zealand Alps.
The attractive, ternate leaves are thick, very leathery and very glossy deep green.
The very fragrant, white flowers are borne on umbels up to 8 inches across.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist soil. Remove the flower stalks immediately after blooming since if the plant is allowed to set seed it will usually then act as a biennial and die.

* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Angelica polymorpha
A short-lived perennial, reaching up to 6 feet, that is native to central China, Manchuria, Korea and Japan. It is found on moist grassland, woodland and streambanks in the wild.
The 2 to 4 pinnate leaves, up to 12 x 10 inches in size, are composed of deeply-toothed, ovate to oblong leaflets, up to 2.5 x 1.5 inches in size. The foliage is blue-green.
The white flowers are borne on umbels, up to 8 inches wide, during early to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 7.

Angelica pubescens ( Pubescent Angelica )
A short-lived perennial, reaching up to 6.5 x 4 feet, that is native to alpine meadows in Japan.
The 2 to 3 pinnate leaves are composed of leaflets up to 6 x 3 inches in size. The foliage is bright green.
The white flowers are borne during late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in full sun or partial shade.
Propagation can be from division or seed.

Angelica sachalinensis ( Sachalin Angelica )
A short-lived perennial, reaching up to 8 feet, that is native to Sakhalin Island and Japan.
The stems are purple.

Angelica sinensis ( Dong Quai )
A biennial or perennial ( if prevented from seeding ), reaching up to 3.3 x 2.7 feet in size, that is native to moist open woodlands in central China.
The 2 to 3 pinnate leaves are up to 12 x 10 inches in size. The toothed, ovate leaflets are up to 1.5 x 1 inch in size.
The white flowers are borne late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 7 to 9.
It is claimed to have many medicinal effects, however whether there is controversy regarding proof and safety of.

Angelica taiwanensis ( Taiwanese Angelica )
A short-lived perennial, reaching up to 6.5 x 3 feet, that is native to Taiwan.
The creamy-white flowers are borne on large heads during summer.
Hardy zone 6 to 9 in full sun or shade on consistently moist soil.
Propagation is from seed.

Angelica ursina ( Bear's Angelica )
A gigantic perennial, reaching up to 13 x 6 feet with a stem diameter up to 3.5 inches, that is native to riverbanks and moist alpine meadows in Kamchatka, Sakhalin, the southern Kuril Islands and northern Japan. It is among the largest and most stately of all perennials for temperate climates.
The huge basal, 3-compound leaves, up to 4.5 feet x 16 inches in size, are composed of finely-toothed, ovate leaflets. The tropical-looking foliage is luxuriant bright green.
The white flowers are borne on gigantic flower heads during mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 ( 4 on protected sites ) in full sun or partial shade on deep, fertile, moist soil.

* historic archive photo


Angelica venenosa ( Hairy Angelica )
A short-lived perennial, reaching up to 6.5 feet, that is native to eastern North America ( from southern Michigan to Massachusetts; south to Arkansas to northern Florida ).

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

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