Saturday, February 4, 2012

Leopardbane

Doronicum

Doronicum austriacum ( Leopardbane )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 4 feet, that is native to central Europe. The cordate-triangular leaves are deep green. The foliage dies down during summer if severe heat or drought occurs.
The yellow, daisy-like flowers, up to 2.4 inches across, are borne during spring.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on moist soil. It does not enjoy hot summers. Divide every 2 or 3 years during autumn or early spring to maintain vigor.

Doeonicum carpetanum
A perennial, reaching up to 2.7 feet, that is native to alpine meadows in southwestern Europe ( from the Pyrenees Mountains to northern Spain ).
The cordate-ovate leaves are deep green.
The showy, yellow flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are borne late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in partial shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil.

Doronicum orientale ( Caucasian Leopardbane )
Also called Doronicum caucasicum and D. cordatum. It forms a slow-spreading, rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 2 x 2 ( possibly much wider with great age ) feet, that is native to woodlands in Eurasia ( Hungary to the Caucasus; south to Sicily to Lebanon to Turkey ). The toothed, cordate-triangular leaves are up to 3.2 inches in length. The foliage is deep green. The foliage dies down during summer if severe heat or drought occurs.
The golden-yellow, daisy-like flowers, up to 3 ( rarely over 2 ) inches across, are borne during mid to late spring. The flowers look great combined with Red Tulips.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on moist, well drained soil. It thrives in open woodlands. It does not enjoy hot summers and will go dormant if too hot and dry ( a habit enabling it to survive in Mediterranean climates ). Divide every 2 or 3 years during autumn or early spring to maintain vigor.

* video found on Youtube


'Leonardo Compact'
Moderate growing and compact in habit, reaching a maximum size of 1 x 1 foot, making it a great plant for edging and containers. It looks great mixed with blue creeping phlox.

* photo taken on Apr 6 2013 in Columbia, MD


'Little Leo'
A moderate growing, compact perennial, reaching a maximum size of 16 x 18 inches.
The semi-double, bright yellow flowers, up to 3.2 inches across, are borne during very early spring.

* photo taken on Mar 21 2012 in Columbia, MD


'Magnificum'
Fast growing, reaching up to 2.5 x 3 ++ feet, forming wide patches via underground rhizomes.
The large yellow daisies, up to 3.2 inches across, are borne mid to late spring.

'Spring Beauty'
The flowers are very double.

Doronicum pardalianches ( Great Leopardbane )
A fast growing to invasive, rhizomatous perennial, forming a dense clump up to 6 x 3.5 ( rarely over 4 x 3 ) feet, that is native to western and central Europe ( England to Germany; south to Spain to Italy ).
The toothed, cordate-triangular leaves are deep green. The foliage dies down during summer if severe heat or drought occurs.
The yellow, daisy-like flowers, up to 2.4 inches across, are borne on branched stems during spring ( sometimes with a few persisting into mid-summer ).
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on moist soil. It does not enjoy hot summers. Divide every 2 or 3 years during autumn or early spring to maintain vigor.

'Gold Bunch'
More compact and clumping, only reaching 32 inches in height at most.
The foliage is more persistent during summer heat.

Doronicum plantagineum ( Leopardbane )
A vigorous, rhizomatous perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 4 feet, that is native to western Europe ( France to western Italy; south to the Mediterranean; also found wild in the British Isles ). The cordate-triangular leaves are hairy and bright green. The foliage dies down during summer if severe heat or drought occurs.
The yellow, daisy-like flowers, up to 2.4 inches across, are borne on branched stems during mid to late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on moist soil. It does not enjoy hot summers. Divide every 2 or 3 years during autumn or early spring to maintain vigor.

'Excelsum'
Vigorous, reaching up to 5 feet in height and forming extensive colonies.
The large flowers, up to 5 inches across, are borne 3 to 4 per stem.

* historical archive photo

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