Saturday, February 4, 2012

Vancouveria

Vancouveria

* excellent videos found on youtube


Vancouveria chrysantha
A creeping, evergreen perennial, reaching up to 16 inches in height, that is native to the western U.S. from southwest Oregon to northern California.
The leaves are oomposed of leaflets, up to 1.6 inches long. The foliage is deep green.
The white flower, up to 0.5 inches wide, are borne during early summer.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 in partial shade on a light soil.

Vancouveria hexandra ( Northern Inside-out Flower )
A vigorous, rhizomatous, semi-evergreen perennial, reaching up to 20 inches x 3 + feet, that is native to rich forests from northern Washington State to northwest California.
The leaves, up to 16 inches in length, are divided into up to 27 leaflets, up to 1 x 0.6 inches in size. The foliage is bright green at first, later turning to mid-green.
The nodding white flowers, up to 0.6 inches wide, are borne late spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( possibly 4 on protected sites with deep winter mulch) in partial to full shade on moist, humus-rich soil. It is surprisingly heat tolerant in the southeastern U.S. It is even dry shade tolerant where summers aren't extremely hot. Prune out winter damaged foliage during early spring. Plants should be planted 2 to 3 feet apart in order to form an eventual groundcover. Propagation is from division done during autumn or early spring.

* photo taken by The Wild Garden, www.nwplants.com


Vancouveria planipetala ( Redwood Ivy )
A creeping, evergreen perennial, reaching up to 20 inches in height, that is native to Pacific coastal forests from southwest Oregon to Monterey County, California.
The leaves are composed of 3 ( rarely 5 ), shallowly 3 to 5 lobed leaflets up to 1.5 x 1.5 inches in size. The leathery foliage is glossy deep green.
The 25 to 30, tiny, white to very pale purple flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne on upright clusters during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in partial shade on moist, cool, fertile, humus-rich, well drained soil. In cold climates, it may become deciduous. Propagation is usually done by division during autumn or early spring.

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