Thursday, February 2, 2012

Fleabane

Erigeron

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* photos taken on Apr 23 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken by A.H. Carhart @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo of unknown internet source


Erigeron aurantiacus ( Orange Daisy )
A short-lived, clump-forming perennial, reaching a maximum size of 1 x 1 foot, that is native to Turkestan.
The lance-shaped, velvety leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are mid-green.
The orange-yellow flowers, up to 2.3 inch across, are borne all summer long.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil.

Erigeron aureus ( Alpine Yellow Fleabane )
A perennial, reaching a maximum size of 6 x 8 inches, that is native to southern British Columbia, the Rocky Mountains of Alberta and Washington State.
The toothed, narrow-obovate leaves are deep green above, bright green beneath.
The golden-yellow flowers, up to 1 inch across, are borne late spring into summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil.

* historic archive photo


Erigeron compositus ( Alpine Fleabane )
A tufted perennial, reaching a maximum size of just 10 x 10 ( rarely over 4 x 8 ) inches in size, that is native from northern Alaska to the arctic islands to Greenland & Newfoundland; south in the Rocky Mountains to California & northern Arizona in the western U.S..
It is great for rock garden.
The deeply-cut foliage is woolly, silvery-green.
The white to lavender flowers, up to 0.8 inches across, are borne late spring into summer.
Hardy zones 1 to 6 in full sun on sandy, well drained soil. Very drought tolerant.
Propagation is from seed and it often self seeds.

Erigeron glaucous ( Beach Aster )
A handsome, succulent, sprawling, mat-forming perennial, reaching up to 1.5 x 3 ( rarely over 1 ) feet, that is native to the western U.S. throughout much of coastal Oregon and California. It has naturalized in much of coastal Europe.
The broadly-oval leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are blue-green or deep green. The basal foliage is evergreen in mild climates.
The large, violet-blue ( with golden-yellow center ) daisies, up to 2.3 inches wide, are borne late spring into early summer. Im mild climates such as coastal California, they may bloom nearly all year if regularly deadheaded. The flowers are magnets for hummingbirds and butterflies.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun to partial shade ( partial shade where summers are extremely hot ) on just about any well drained soil. Very tough and easy to grow, they are tolerant of salt air, drought and are rarely bothered by deer. It grows best along the seashore and does not enjoy extreme heat without partial shade and will not grow in the hot humid southeast. Deadhead throughout the blooming season then cut back hard during late fall.

'Albus'
White flowers, otherwise identical.

'Rose Purple'
Pinkish-purple daisies.

'Sea Breeze'
Compact and dense, reaching a maximum size of 2.5 x 3 feet.
The foliage is gray-green.
The large daisies are bright pink with yellow centers.

* photos taken on Oct 1 2014 in Howard Co., MD


'Wayne Roderick'
Reaches up to 10 inches in height, with lavender flowers, borne mid spring through autumn frosts.

Erigeron x hybrida
Hybrids usually including Erigeron speciosus, that usually reach a maximum size of 32 inches x 2 feet, and have abundant showy flowers, up to 2.4 inches across, borne all summer long. The lance-shaped leaves are mid-green.
They are great for the landscape border.
Most are hardy zones 2 to 7 in full sun on well drained soil.

'Adria'
Blue-violet flowers, otherwise identical.

'Double Beauty'
Double blue-violet flowers, otherwise identical.

'Foerster's Liebling'
Deep pink, semi-double flowers, otherwise identical.

'Gaiety'
Bright pink, single flowers, otherwise identical.

'Prosperity'
A perennial, reaching up to 32 inches x 2 feet, with large, single to semi-double, light-blue daisies, up to 1.5 inches across, borne early summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.

'Rotes Meer'
Red semi-double flowers, otherwise identical.

Erigeron karvinskianus ( Santa Barbara Daisy )
A fast growing to invasive, spreading, woody-based, groundcover perennial, reaching a maximum size of 2.5 x 6 ( rarely over 2 x 5 ) feet, that is native to mountains of southern Mexico and Central America to Venezuela. It has naturalized in much of southern Europe. Can be used in hanging baskets.
The small, toothed ( or often 3-lobed ), elliptical leaves are deep green. The foliage is evergreen to 15 F.
The abundant, white to bright pink ( yellow centered ) daisies, up to 0.8 inches wide, are borne spring through fall ( or all year in mild climates )
Hardy zones 8 to 11 ( reports of 6 & 7 ) in full sun on sandy, well drained soil. Cut back hard occasionally to maintain vigor. Propagation is from seed and it often self seeds.

'Bleutenmeer'
Flowers open white, later deepening to purple.

'Profusion'
White flowers.

Erigeron peregrinus ( Subalpine Fleabane )
A perennial, reaching up to 2 feet, that is native to western North America ( from Bethel, Alaska to Fairbanks, Alaska to southwest Yukon to Fort Nelson, British Columbia to Jasper National Park, Alberta; south to central California to northern New Mexico )
The flowers are blue.
Hardy zones 2 to 7.

* historical archive photo


Erigeron philadephus ( Philadelphia Fleabane )
A fibrous-rooted, short-lived perennial, reaching up to 2.6 x 2 feet, that is native to grasslands ( occasionally open woods ) over most of Canada and the northern U.S. ( with scattered distribution further south ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was uncommon around Point Pelee and the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s. It was abundant on the Ohio shore during that time.
The obobvate leaves, up to 6 x 1.2 ( rarely over 3 x 0.6 ) inches in size, are hairy, mid-green.
The abundant flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are lilac-pink ( rarely white ) with a yellow disc. They are borne during early summer, often repeating during autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 in full sun on moist, well drained soil. Cut back to basal rosette as soon as the seed is dispersed.

* photo taken by Patrick J. Alexander @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on May 9 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 26 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


Erigeron pulchellus ( Robin's Plantain )
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 2 feet high, that is native to meadows and open woodlands in eastern North America ( from northern Minnesota to central Wisconsin to central Michigan to southeast Quebec & northern Maine; south to eastern Texas to South Carolina ). It can be used as groundcover. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was common around Windsor as well as on the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The ovate leaves, up to 4.8 x 2 inches in size, are hairy bright green.
The fragrant flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, are lavender, soft pink or white. They are borne late spring to early autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade on dry to moderately moist, well drained soil.

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken on Jul 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON


Erigeron scopulorum ( Rock Fleabane )
A low, compact, mat-forming groundcover perennial, reaching up to 1 x 15 inches, that is native to southeast Arizona and southwestern New Mexico. It can be used for filling in spaces between stepping stones.
The foliage is silvery.
The pink daisies are borne during late spring to early summer. Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil. It is very drought tolerant.

Erigeron speciosus ( Rock Fleabane )
A taprooted perennial, reaching up to 2.5 x 2 feet, that is native to western North America ( from Vancouver Island to Prince George, British Columbia to Drumheller, Alberta to extreme southwest Saskatchewan to western South Dakota; south to Oregon to Arizona & New Mexico.
The foliage is deep green.
The abundant, blue ( with yellow center ) daisies, up to 1.5 inches wide, are borne during early to mid summer.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on just about any well drained soil. Cut back flower stems after first flush of blooming to encourage repeat bloom. Propagation is from division during early spring or seed.

'Azure Fairy'
Reaches up to 32 x 32 inches, bearing lavender-blue, semi-double flowers all summer long.

'Blue Beauty'

'Darkest of All'
Violet blue flowers.

'Rose Jewel'
Also called 'Pink Jewel'. Reaches up to 32 inches x 2 feet, with bright pink daisies borne late spring to early summer. Hardy zones 3 to 9

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


'Sincerity'
Lavender single flowers.

Erigeron tweedyi ( Tweedy's Fleabane )
A low, rosette forming perennial, that is native to the Rocky Mountains ( from Idaho to southwest Montana; south to northwest Wyoming ).
The leaves are narrowly oval.
The pale lavender daisies, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne during late spring.

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