Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Jacaranda

Jacaranda
A genus of close to 50 species of both deciduous and evergreen, fast growing trees that are part of the larger Bignonia family. Most have bipinnate foliage but some are simple or pinnate. They can be either shallow or deep rooted but may be greedy feeders causing nearby plants to suffer from root competition.
The attractive, bell-shaped flowers are borne either during spring or summer.
The Jacarandas are mostly found in warm temperate, subtropical or tropical climates.
They require full sun on rich, well drained soil on a site protected from excessive wind. Jacarandas do not enjoy wet clay soils. They are very frost tender during the first few years ( covering with a blanket during the coldest clear nights may help when young ) though become somewhat hardier as they grow.
Transplanting is recommended during late winter while they are dormant.
Propagation is from seed that is soaked in water for 24 hours before sowing during late winter or early spring. They can also be grown from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer which should be shaded until they root. The Jacaranda usually blooms in 5 to 7 years if grown from seed.

* photo of unknown internet source


Jacaranda acutifolia
A small tree, reaching up to 40 + x 40 feet. Some records include: 8 years - 20 x 13 feet.
The leaves are up to 18 inches in length.
Hardy zones 9a to 11.

Jacaranda caroba
A small to medium-sized, evergreen tree that is native to Central America and northern South America. Some records include: largest on record - 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are divided into up to 12 small leaflets, up to 1.5 inches in length. The leaves are used as a sedative in Guyana.
The violet, tubular flowers are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 10 to 11.

Jacaranda chelonia
A medium-sized, semi-evergreen tree that is native to Argentina. Some records include: largest on record - 100 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The bipinnate leaves are divided into very numerous, tiny leaflets, up to 0.7 inches in length.
The purplish-blue flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne on clusters, up to 12 inches in length. They are borne during early spring, before J. mimosifolia comes into bloom.
The wood is used for cabinetry.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating 20 F ).

Jacaranda copaia
A very tall tree, reaching up to 150 ( averaging 100 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet.
The huge, bipinnate leaves are the largest of the Jacaranda, reaching up to 66 x 28 inches in size. The leaves are divided into very numerous leaflets, up to 1 inch in length.
Hardy zones 11 to 12.

Jacaranda cuspidifolia
A small tree that is native to northern and central South America ( from Bolivia to Brazil; south to Paraguay and Argentina.
Some records include: largest on record - 40 x 30 feet.
The large, bipinnate leaves, up to 28 inches in length, are divided into leaflets, up to 2 inches in length. The ferny foliage is luxuriant mid-green.
The large, light blue flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne in larger clusters than those of Jacaranda mimosifolia.
They are followed by rounded, pale brown fruits.
Hardy zones 10 to 11

Jacaranda jasminoides
A medium-sized tree, reaching a maximum height of 60 feet.
This Jacaranda has no dormant period and may bloom throughout the year.
Hardy zones 10 to 12.

Jacaranda mimosifolia
A fast growing, wide-spreading, rounded, deciduous large tree, that is native to Brazil and northwest Argentina. Some records include: 2 years - 10 feet; 9 years - 35 feet; largest on record - 170 x 75 ( rarely over 70 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 6.3 feet. It is among the most beautiful of all tropical trees for streets and parks. The Mimosa Jacaranda is long-lived, exceeding 140 years. A very common tree, planted in many warmer regions around the globe including south Florida. It is among the most common trees in Pretoria, South Africa.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 24 x 9 inches, are divided into very numerous, tiny leaflets, up to 0.5 inches in length.
The fine-textured, mid-green foliage is deciduous during late winter after turning deep yellow.
The abundant, hanging, lavender, bell-shaped flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne on showy, terminal clusters, up to 12 inches in length. They are borne on the bare branches during spring before the new foliage emerges.
They are followed by reddish-brown seed-pods.
The furrowed bark is light gray.
The wood is sometimes used for timber.
Hardy zones 10 to 11 ( tolerating as low as 25 F and killed at temperatures of 20 or colder ) in full sun on light, well drained soil where yearly rainfall exceeds 36 inches. It is very drought tolerant, thriving in places such as central Chile, southern California, southern Italy, Greece and Isreal. It is also extremely heat tolerant, even thriving at Lake Havasu, Arizona with irrigation. Watering during early spring may cause the tree to leafout early thus hiding the blooms.
It thrives on soil of any PH up to 7.5, but is not salt tolerant.

* photo taken on Jan 11 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida

* photo of unknown internet source

* historic archive photos

* video found on Youtube




'White Christmas'
White flowers, otherwise identical. Can be planted in combination with the lavender flowered species.

Jacaranda obtusifolia
A broad-spreading, small tree that is native to tropical regions of South America.
Some records include: 3 years - 17 feet; largest on record - 60 feet.
The bipinnate leaves, up to 20 inches in length, are divided into very numerous, tiny leaflets, up to 0.6 inches in length. The feathery foliage is glossy green.
The blue-lavender, bell-shaped flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne on large heads during late spring.
Hardy zones 10 to 11.

Jacaranda semiserrata
A large tree, reaching up to 70 feet in height or sometimes more.
The very large bipinnate leaves are divided into small, ovate leaves.
The foliage is very luxuriant bright green.
The red-purple, tubular flowers are borne on large clusters during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 10 to 11.

7 comments:

  1. This is my favorite tree and one of my most sacred. I am hoping this year for the beautiful lavender blooms:)

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  2. Wow! Jacandra is really a beautiful tree. I am amazed on its lavender blooms. It is really breath taking. Great post!


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  3. Thank you! I have always wondered about the possibility of extending the Jacaranda's range northward into zone 8 by finding and experimenting with seed originating from higher elevations in their native range. So far I don't know of anyone that has tried this.

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