Friday, December 30, 2011

Incarvillea

Incarvillea

A genus of perennials that are part of the larger Bignoniaceae family.
Transplanting is difficult due to deep taproot. Bare root plants should be planted with the crown 3 or 4 inches below the soil surface.

* excellent video found on Youtube


Incarvillea arguta
A woody-based perennial, reaching up to 3 x 1 feet, that is native to dry valleys in the Himalayan mountains from northwest India to southwest China. It often flowers during the first year from seed, unlike most other species which take up to 3 years.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 5 to 9 toothed, lance-shaped leaflets, up to 2 inches in length. The leathery foliage is deep green.
The hanging, pale pink flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, are borne up to 20 per raceme during early to mid-summer.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in full sun or partial shade on fertile, very well drained soil. Propagation is from seed sown during autumn or spring.

Incarvillea compacta ( Hardy Gloxinia )
A perennial that is native to high mountains in Tibet and west central China.
The wrinkled pinnate compound leaves form rosettes. The leaflets are ovate. The foliage is glossy deep green.
The deep pink to red-purple flowers are borne on dense racemes up to 12 inches in length, during late spring.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on humus-rich, well drained soil. It prefers a cool maritime climate. Mulch is recommended where winters are cold. Propagation from seed is easy and flowering occurs in 3 years.

Incarvillea delavayi ( Hardy Gloxinia )
A deep rooted perennial, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 5 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, is native from Yunnan Province in southwest China.
The clump of bold foliage is glossy deep green. The pinnate leaves, up to 12 inches in length, are composed of toothed, lance-shaped leaflets. .
The large, trumpet-shaped flowers, up to 3 inches in length, are rosy-purple. They are borne up to 10 per raceme from late spring to mid-summer if deadheaded.
The flowers are borne late spring to mid-summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 ( use on protected site with mulch in zone 5 and 6 ) in full sun or partial shade.
It requires deep, fertile, light, well drained soil and soils that are heavy or wet during winter may contribute to root rot. In colder climates it can also be used in containers that are brought into a cool garage during winter. This fleshy rooted plant does not enjoy root disturbance.

* historical archive photo


'Bee's Pink'
Pink flowers that are throated white.

'Snowtop'
White flowers.

Incarvillea emodi
A woody-based perennial, reaching up to 20 inches tall, that is native to the Himalayas from Afghanistan to western Nepal.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 9 or 11 ovate leaflets, up to 1.6 inches in length. The blue-green foliage resembles that of Robinia pseudoacacia.
The bright pink flowers, up to 2.3 inches in length, are borne during early to mid spring.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in full sun on dry, very well drained soil.

Incarvillea olgae
A woody-based perennial, reaching up to 5 ( rarely over 4 ) feet; is native to central Asia in Turkestan and Afghanistan.
The leaves are divided into elliptical leaflets. The foliage is deep green.
The purplish-pink, tubular flowers are borne all summer long.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( 5 on protected sites ) in full sun to partial shade ( shaded during hottest part of day where summers are hot ) on moist, fertile, well drained soil that is dry mulched ( ex. pine needles ) during winter. It is drought tolerant once fully established. Propagation is from division during early spring before growth begins or sowing the seed during late autumn.

RELATED PLANTS

Niedzwedzkia semiretschenskia
Closely related to Incarvillea, this very attractive, woody-based perennial, reaching up to 16 inches in height, is native to the Tien Shan mountains in Kazakhstan. It is critically endangered in the wild.
The deeply-cut leaves are linear-lobed.
The orangish-pink to violet-purple flowers, up to 2.3 x 1.6 inches in size, are borne during a period lasting up to 3 months, during late spring to late summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 ( 5 on protected sites ); it is easy to grow on dry, very well drained soil.

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