Friday, December 30, 2011

Waldsteinia

Waldsteinia ( Barren Strawberry )
A small genus of 6 species of groundcover perennials for partial to full shade.
They are distant relatives of the Roses.

* photo taken on Aug 29 2013 in Clarksville, MD

* photos taken on Apr 27 2015 in Columbia, MD


Waldsteinia fragaroides ( Barren Strawberry )
A moderately fast growing, low, evergreen, groundcover perennial, reaching up to 1 ( rarely over 0.5 ) x 3.3+ feet, that is native to open upland woods in eastern North America ( from northern Minnesota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Tobermory, Ontario to Haliburton, Ontario to southeast Quebec to New Brunswick; south to northern Arkansas to northern Alabama to northern Georgia to central North Carolina ). It is endangered in Minnesota, Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, New Jersey, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine. It is extinct in Connecticut. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant around Windsor during the 1800s.
The trifoliate, compound leaves, up to 5 inches in length, are composed of 3 toothed, pointed-oval leaflets, up to 3 x 2.5 inches in size. The somewhat hairy foliage is glossy deep green, turning to bronze during winter. The foliage is somewhat similar to that of the groundcover potentillas or strawberries.
The yellow, 5-petalled flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne on sprays late spring to early summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on moist, well drained soil.
Drought and clay tolerant. This groundcover does tolerate moderate foot traffic.

Waldsteinia geoides ( Golden Strawberry )
A perennial, reaching up to 10 inches x 1.5 feet, forming compact foliage mounds.
It is non-stoloniferous and is great for edging.
The deeply-toothed, 3 lobed, palmate Maple-like leaves are luxuriant deep green.
The profuse, bright yellow, 5-petalled flowers are borne mid spring to early summer.

Waldsteinia ternata ( Siberian Waldsteinia )
A very fast growing to invasive, semi-evergreen, carpet-forming, groundcover perennial, reaching up to 1 ( rarely over 0.5 ) x 3.3 + feet, that is native to mountain forests from central Europe, eastwards through Siberia into Sakhalin, northern China, Korea and Japan.
The Siberian Waldsteinia spreads by stolons.
The trifoliate, compound leaves, up to 5 inches in length, are composed of 3 toothed, pointed-oval leaflets, up to 3 inches in length. The somewhat hairy foliage is glossy deep green. The foliage is somewhat similar to that of the groundcover potentillas or strawberries.
The yellow, 5-petalled flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne on sprays mid to late spring. The bloom season lasts over a 5 week period.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil.
Drought tolerant. This groundcover does tolerate moderate foot traffic.

* photos taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, Washington, DC


Fragaria

Fragaria chiloensis
A fast growing, groundcover perennial, reaching up to 8 inches x 2 feet in size, that is native form coastal Alaska to California.
The trifoliate leaves are composed of 3 leaflets. The foliage is glossy deep green, turning reddish during winter.
The fragrant, white flowers are 1.5 inches wide.
They are followed by edible, red berries up to 0.5 inches wide.
Thrives in full sun to partial shade on moist, acidic to neutral, well drained soil. Tolerates pure sand.

Fragaria 'Lipstick'
A semi-evergreen, groundcover perennial, reaching up to 6 inches in height. It is great for window boxes and trailing over the sides of planters.
The leaves are composed of 3 toothed, oval to rounded leaflets. The foliage is glossy bright green.
The reddish-pink flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are borne late spring to late autumn.
They are sometimes followed by small, red fruits.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun on moist, fertile, well drained soil. Propagation is by the trailing runners.

Fragaria 'Pink Panda'
A semi-evergreen, groundcover perennial, reaching up to 1 ( usually half that ) foot in height. It is great for window boxes and trailing over the sides of planters. It is the hybrid of Fragaris grandiflora & Potentilla palustris.
The leaves are composed of 3 toothed, oval to rounded leaflets. The foliage is glossy bright green.
The pink flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are borne late spring to late autumn.
They are sometimes followed by small, red fruits.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun on moist, fertile, well drained soil. Propagation is by the trailing runners.

Fragaria vesca ( European Strawberry )
Also called Woodland Strawberry. A perennial, reaching up to 8 inches in height, that is native to the European Alps and North America ( from British Columbia to Northwest Territories to Newfoundland; south to California to New Mexico mountains to central Nebraska to northeast Missouri to central Indiana to southern West Virginia to central Maryland ). It is found in rich open woods in the wild. It can be used for edging. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant around Point Pelee, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It has become extinct in Indiana.
The leaves are composed of 3 toothed, ovate or oval leaflets. The foliage is bright green.
The white flowers are borne on small cymes. They are followed by edible, red berries borne early summer through autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on just about any moist, fertile, well drained soil. Propagation is from transplanting the runners.

'Albomarginata'
The leaves are edged creamy-white.

Fragaria virginiana ( Virginia Strawberry )
A groundcover perennial that is a widespread North American native ( from Alaska to Newfoundland; south to California to Oklahoma to central Georgia ). It is found in fields, hedgerows and open woods in the wild. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant in the Canard River Valley, around Point Pelee, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit during that time.
The leaves are composed of 3 toothed, elliptical leaflets, up to 4 inches in length. The leaves can be used to make a Vitamin C rich tea.
The white flowers are up to 1 inch wide. They are followed by tasty, edible, red berries, up to 0.8 inches wide.
Thrives in full sun to partial shade on sandy, well drained soil.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

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