Friday, December 30, 2011

Washingtonia Palms

Washingtonia
A genus 2 species of Fan Palms that are native to the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico. They are very easy to grow in dry or mediterranean climates and are tolerant of heat, drought, wind and salt. They are not prone to lethal yellowing.
They are often used for lining streets and highways. The Washingtonias do not enjoy climates with year round high humidity.

* historic archive photo


Washingtonia filifera ( Washingtonia Palm )
A moderate growing, stout, large palm, that is native to the southern California and Nevada as well as neighboring northwest Mexico. It is frequently planted in the Meditteranean region of Europe. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - 130 x 40 ( rarely over 80 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 4.5 feet. It is very long-lived with trees as old as 260 years being known.
The fan-shaped, palmate leaves, up to 5 feet across, are borne on spiny leafstalks up to 6.5 feet in length. Each leaf may have up to 50 leaflets. The foliage is bright green to gray-green. The old leaves usually persist on the trees but are often pruned off for appearance and fire prevention.
The creamy-white flowers are borne on panicles, up to 16.5 ( rarely over 10 ) feet in length.
They are followed by small, blackish-brown, hard drupes. The prolific fruits are produced mid to late summer in clusters up to 10+ pounds.
The thick trunk is gray.
They prefer full sun on moderately moist, fertile soil.
Propagation is easy from seed.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 in full sun. Fully established trees are very tolerant of drought.

* photos of unknown internet source







* historical archive photos

* videos found on Youtube



'Truth or Consequences'
Hardier, reported to even tolerate temporary exposure to as low as 0 F.

Washingtonia robusta ( Mexican Fan Palm )
A fast growing, slender but very tall palm, that is native to far northwestern Mexico though it is very commonly planted in southern California. Some records include: 7 years - 50 feet ( usually half that ); largest on record - 140 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet. It is shorter lived than Washingtonia filifera, living up to 100 years or rarely more.
The fan-shaped, palmate leaves, up to feet across, are borne on spiny, reddish-brown leafstalks. The foliage is bright green.
The creamy-pink flowers are borne on panicles, up to feet in length, during summer.
They are followed by dark brown drupes.
They prefer full sun on moderately moist, fertile soil.
Propagation is easy from seed.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 ( defoliation occurs at 12 F ).

* photos of unknown internet source



* historic archive photo

No comments:

Post a Comment