Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Bursera

Bursera

Bursera fagaroides ( Fragrant Bursera )
An attractive, rounded, deciduous, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 33 x 26 ( rarely half that ) feet, that is native from southern Arizona and the Baja Peninsula; south through the mountains into southern Mexico. Some records include: largest trunk diameter - 1 foot.
The pinnately-compound leaves, up to 2.5 inches in length, are composed of up to 11 leaflets, up to 1.6 inches in length. The foliage is deep green.
Hardy zones 10 to 11 ( est ) in full sun on well drained soil. It is extremely heat and drought tolerant.
* recommended link
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/159609-Bursera-fagaroides

Bursera microphylla ( Elephant Tree )
A small tree, rarely exceeding 13 x 16 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 inches. Some records include: largest on record - 50 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet; fastest growth rate - 2 feet. It is native from far southern California into Arizona; south to into the Baja Peninsula and northwestern Mexico. It is endangered in the wild.
The pinnately-compound leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are composed of 13 to 33 leaflets, up to 0.5 inches in length. The leaves are clustered near the stem tips. The foliage is glossy bright green.
The whitish flowers are borne in clusters.
They are followed by fruits up to 0.2 inches wide.
The papery bark is whitish in color. The thick twigs are red.
Hardy zones 9 to 12 in full sun on light or gravelly, very well drained soil. It is extremely drought tolerant.

* photos taken on Aug 23 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC


Bursera simaruba ( Gumbo Limbo )
A fast growing, semi-evergreen to evergreen, rounded, large tree, native to south Florida, the Caribbean and Central America. The maximum potential size is 160 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 5.2 feet. Most trees nowadays don't even approach half that size but it is gaining value as an urban shade and street tree. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 8 feet. It is often found very near to the coast in the wild but not on sites that regularly flood.
The pinnately-compound leaves, up to 12 inches in length, are composed of 5 or 7 leaflets up to 5.5 x 3 ( rarely over 5 x 2 ) inches in size.
The greenish-white flowers are borne during early summer.
They are followed by deep red, 3-angled fruits up to 0.3 inches in length.
The very attractive bark is papery and orange-red.
Hardy zones 9 to 12, it is very tolerant of drought and salt. Gumbo Limbo is also rarely prone to insect pests or disease.

* photos taken on Jan 3 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida

* historic archive photo


'Zeke'

* photo taken on Jan 3 2011 @ Deerfield Beach Arboretum, Florida

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