Friday, January 22, 2016

Viburnum - part 1

The Viburnums are a huge diverse family of trees and shrubs. They grow in many climates and tolerate many conditions though prefer light, well drained loams. They are mostly deer resistant and can be reproduced from either seed sown in the fall or from stem tip cuttings ( 4 inch long ) taken during early summer ( hardwood cuttings during autumn also work with some species ). The seeds should be soaked for 24 hours before sowing.
The evergreen Viburnums are best pruned just before leafing out in spring.
The Viburnum Leaf Beetle is a new insect in North America. It was accidently introduced and comes from Europe. It is moving south from Quebec. The larvae feed on and can defoliate the shrub.


* photo taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore College, PA

* photos taken on July 10 2013 in Ellicott City, MD


* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


* photo taken on Dec 3 2015 in Columbia, MD


Viburnum acerifolium ( Maple leaf Viburnum )
A moderate growing, upright suckering, medium-sized, deciduous shrub native to deciduous forests and floodplains in eastern North America ( from eastern Minnesota to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Bracebridge, Ontario to Chalk River, Ontario to Nova Scotia, south to Tennessee & Georgia ). It is extinct from Minnesota and endangered in Iowa. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was sporadic along the Canard River Valley, Point Pelee and the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s. It was abundant on the Lake Erie shore during that time. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - 10 x 6 ( rarely over 5 ) feet.
The leaves, up to 6 x 7 ( usually 5 ) inches, are coarsely-toothed, 3-lobed and maple-like in shape. They are deep green above; downy beneath, turning to yellow, orange and red in autumn. The leaves are oppositely arranged.
The fluffy, fertile, creamy-white flowers are borne on flat clusters, up to 4 inches across, during early summer.
They are followed by oval, purplish-black berries up to 0.3 inches in length. The berries ripen late summer, often persisting into early winter.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in sun or shade on deep fertile soil. Very tolerant of deep shade. Deer resistant.
Clones from e. Texas are drought tolerant.
Propagated from seed sown in fall or softwood cuttings taken during early summer.

* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on July 10 2013 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Aug 8 2014 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Nov 10 2014 in Columbia, MD



* photo taken on Jul 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON

* photos taken on May 25 2016 in Columbia, MD



'Collinsii'
pink flowers

Viburnum alnifolium ( Hobble Bush )
Also called Viburnum lantanoides. It is a spreading, suckering, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 12 feet, that is native to moist shady forests in northeastern North America ( from Parry Sound, Ontario to Temagami, Ontario to Nova Scotia; south to Durham, Ontario to Orangeville, Ontario to far northern Georgia in the Appalachian Mountains to northern New Jersey ). It is endangered in Ohio, Kentucky and New Jersey; extinct in Georgia. It possibly also occurred previously in the northeast portion of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Some records include: largest on record - 23 x 18 feet with trunk diameter of 4 inches
The strongly-veined, finely-toothed, broadly-oval leaves are up to 10 x 10 inches in size. The foliage is deep green above, paler green beneath; turning to yellow or red during autumn.
The white flowers, up to 1 inch across, are borne on clusters, up to 6 inches across, during mid-spring.
They are followed by oval purple-black berries, up to 0.4 inches wide, during late summer into early autumn.
Hardy from zone 2 to 6; this Viburnum does not tolerate chalky alkaline soils.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Viburnum ashei
Similar to Viburnum dentatum in appearance. The flowers are also white and the berries also blue. However the variety 'Frances' is semi-evergreen

Viburnum atrocyaneum
A vase-shaped to rounded shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 6 ( rarely over 6 ) that is native to the Himalayas ( nw India to western China; south to Burma to northern Thailand ).
The elliptical to broadly-ovate, leathery leaves are up to 4 x 2.5 ( rarely over 3 x 1.7 ) inches. The foliage is purplish at first, turning to glossy deep green, then finally bronze-purple during autumn.
The white flowers are borne on clusters, up to 2.4 inches across, during early summer.
They are followed by blue berries, each up to 0.25 inches across, during autumn.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 in full sun to partial shade.

Viburnum awabuki 'Chindo'
A very attractive, fast growing, evergreen shrub reaching 14 feet or more, that is often used as a tall hedge and screen, though sometimes also trained as a free standing tree. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 66 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot. It is native to Korea and central & southern Japan.
The thick, leathery, elliptical to obovate leaves are up to 8 x 2.5 inches in size. The foliage is bright green at first, turning to glossy deep green.
The fragrant, white flowers are borne on clusters up to 10 inches across during early summer.
They are followed by showy, scarlet-red berries during autumn, persisting into winter.
Hardy zones 7 to 10, it can tolerate 10 F with no leaf damage but is killed to the ground at -10F. Thrives in sun or shade. Deer resistant.

* photos taken @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C. on Feb 2009



* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD



* photos taken on April 15 2012 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on May 17 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 28 2012 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Nov 10 2012 in Ellicott City, MD


* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD




* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


* photo taken on Sep 16 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photo taken on Nov 28 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 13 2017 in Columbia, MD





Viburnum betulifolium ( Birch Leaf Viburnum )
An arching upright, deciduous large shrub native to central & western China. It is fast growing ( to 3 feet a year ) and easily reaches 12 feet in 20 years though some may grow up to 23 x 30 feet and with a trunk diameter of 1.3 feet as a small tree.
The broad oval, birch-like leaves are up to 4 inches in length. The foliage is deep bronze at first, turning to glossy bright green above, glossy beneath.
The small, white flowers are borne in showy, compact clusters, up to 4 inches across, during early summer.
They are followed by glowing, glossy, scarlet-red, rounded berries that persist over a long time in fall & winter.
The bark is purple-brown and smooth.
Depending on seed source this extremely attractive Viburnum may be hardy from zone 2 to 8.
Best in moist, deep, fertile, well drained soil. Plant multiple plants to ensure good fruiting.
Propagation is from seed sown during autumn or softwood cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken @ U.S. National Arboretum, Aug 2007


Viburnum bitchiuense ( Yeddo Viburnum )
A slow to moderate growing, bushy, rounded, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 12 feet, that is native to Korea. Some records include: 10 years - 8 feet. It is very rare in the wild.
The foliage is somewhat like Viburnum carlesii but is more narrow ( up to 4.5 x 4 inches ) and on longer stems. The leaves turn red during autumn. Unfortunately, it is prone to leaf spot in humid climates.
The very fragrant white flowers are produced on rounded clusters up to 3 ( rarely 5 ) inches across, during late spring.
The flowers are followed by egg-shaped berries that are glowing red turning to black.
Hardy zones 5 to 8, it is very heat and humidity tolerant.

Viburnum x bodnantense
A hybrid of Viburnum grandiflorum & Viburnum farreri; it forms a fast growing, upright, deciduous large shrub. reaching a maximum size of 18 x 14 feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 5 feet; 5 years - 10 x 6.5 feet.
The deeply-veined, toothed, oval leaves are up to 4 inches in length. The foliage is mid-green above and paler beneath; turning to scarlet-red during autumn. Some forms also carry bronze foliage durng the spring.
The long lasting fragrant, tubular flowers appear on dense clusters up to 3 inches across. They appear on the bare stems during mild periods between late fall and early spring and are resistant to frost.
Hardy from zone 5 to 8 ( possibly even 4 on protected sites ) in full sun to partial shade ( partial shade preferred where summers are hot ) on deep, fertile, well drained soil. It thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada through it occasionally gets some minor dieback at the tips during hard winters. Propagation is from softwood cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken on Oct 23 2011 @Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Charles Lamont'
Carries large bright pink flowers.

'Dawn'
Deep pink fragrant flowers that fade to light pink.
The foliage is bronze at first, turning to deep green, then finally back to reddish-bronze during autumn.
It is hardy at zone 4b Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.

Viburnum bracteatum 'Emerald Lustre' ( Bracted Viburnum )
A rare and very beautiful large Viburnum that grows up to 15 feet tall and wide. It can reach 10 x 10 feet in only 5 years. It makes a great screen. The species is native to Tennessee; south to northwest Alabama to northeast Georgia . It is endangered with extinction in the wild.
The ovate to rounded leaves, up to 5 x 3 inches, look alot like that of Viburnum dentatum but are leathery. The foliage is glossy deep green, turning to yellow or bronze during autumn.
The white, flat-top flower clusters up to 5 inches across are followed by purplish-black ( not blue like V. dentatum ) berries.
Hardy zones 4b to 8 in full sun to partial shade on just about any well drained soil. Very heat tolerant, it is also tolerant of alkaline soils as it is found on limestone ridges in the wild. Despite it's natural range, it thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.

* photo taken on July 10 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 8 2014 in Columbia, MD



* photo taken on Nov 12 2016 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken on Dec 3 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA



* photos taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD






Viburnum buddleifolium
A large, semi-evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum size of 12 x 8 feet, that is native to central China. Some records include: 5 years - 8 x 6.5 feet.
The minutely-toothed, narrowly-oval leaves, up to 8 x 3 inches, are mid-green.
The pinkish-white flowers are borne on dense clusters up to 3 inches across.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

Viburnum burejaeticum ( Manchurian Viburnum )
A moderate growing, large shrub, reaching a maximum size of 18 x 20 feet, that is native to Siberia and the Ussuri Region of Russia; south to northern China. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 4 feet; 10 years - 14 x 8 feet.
The oval leaves, up to 4.5 x 3 inches in size, are deep green, turning to purplish-red during autumn. The foliage resembles that of Viburnum carlesii.
The white flowers are borne on clusters up to 4 inches across.
They are followed by very abundant berries that are red, later turning blackish-blue. They are edible and taste like Raisons.
The bark is almost white.
Hardy from zone 3 to 7 tolerating as low as - 35 F. It is drought tolerant.

Viburnum x burkwoodii ( Burkwood Viburnum )
A bushy and somewhat open rounded shrub that is the result of hybridizing Viburnum carlesii with Viburnum utile. It usually reaches around 10 feet though can sometimes grow much larger, to 15 x 16 feet. It is very fast growing on good sites; some records include: fastest growth rate - 5 feet; 4 years - 8 feet; 15 years - 10 x 14 feet.
The semi-deciduous or evergreen ( zone 8 ) leaves are bronze when young turning glossy deep green and usually yellowing before dropping. The leaves are up to 4 x 2 inches in size.
The intensely fragrant, white ( pink in bud ) flowers, up to 0.5 inches wide, are borne on clusters, up to 4 inches across, during early spring. The fragrance from the blooms can carry as far as 25 feet.
They are followed by fruits, up to 0.3 inches long, that are red, turning to black.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun or partial shade, this tough Viburnum is heat and pollution tolerant and also generally pest and deer resistant.

* photos taken on Apr 11 2015 @ Belmont Mansion, Elkridge, MD


* photos taken on June 20 2015 in Columbia, MD






'Chaneultii'
Compact in habit, reaching up to 5 feet in height. The thick, semi-evergreen foliage is deep green, turning to bronze during autumn.
The flowers are fragrant and white.

'Conoy' ( Conoy Viburnum )
A moderate growing, dense, domed, medium-sized shrub, reaching a maximum size of 8 x 10 ( rarely over 4 ) feet. Some records include: 5 years - 4 x 6 feet; 15 years - 7 x 9 feet
The oval leaves, up to 3 x 1 inch in size, are glossy deep green, turning to deep red during winter. It is often evergreen from zone 6a south.
The lightly fragrant, white flowers are borne on clusters, up to 2.5 inches wide, during late spring.
They are followed by persistent red berries.
Hardy zones 5b to 8. Drought tolerant and also pest & disease free.

* photo taken on April 14 2010 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on Aug 3 2011 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Aug 2 2011 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on April 12 2012 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on April 27 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on May 15 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 15 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 4 2016 in Pikesville, MD

* photo taken on Apr 16 2017 in Pikesville, MD

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA



'Fullbrook'
A medium-sized shrub, reaching up to 6 x 6 feet in 10 years, eventually slightly more.
The ovate leaves are glossy deep green, turning to red over a long season during autumn.
The sweetly fragrant, white ( pink in bud ) flowers are borne on large clusters.
It is both heat and cold tolerant.

'Mohawk' ( Mohawk Viburnum )
Similar to Viburnum x burkwoodii but with mildew and leaf spot resistant foliage that is very glossy deep green turning brilliant orange-red in fall. The leaves reach up to 5 x 3.5 ( rarely over 4.5 x 2.5 ) inches in size.
The flowers are dark red in bud, opening to white.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* photos taken on Sep 15 2013 in Howard Co., MD



* photos taken on Nov 21 2013 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on Apr 14 2010 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 26 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 1 2014 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on Sep 9 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 21 2015 in Columbia, MD






* photos taken on Apr 29 2015 in Columbia, MD





* photos taken on Apr 29 2015 in Howard Co., MD





* photo taken on Oct 14 2015 in Baltimore Co., MD


'Park Farm Hybrid'
Very fast growing and upright, rounded in habit, reaching up to 10 x 10 feet or rarely more.
The large foliage is glossy deep green.
Large flower clusters up to 5 inches across. Foliage turns red in fall.

* photo taken on April 8 2010 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on Sep 2 2014 in Columbia, MD


Viburnum x carlcephalum
This popular garden Viburnum is a hybrid between Viburnum carlesii & Viburnum macrocephalum subsp. keteleerii. It forms a fast growing, rounded, bushy, large, deciduous shrub. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; largest on record - 15 x 14 ( typically half that ) feet.
The cordate, broadly-oval leaves, up to 5 ( rarely 8 ) inches in length, are lustrous deep green above, paler beneath. The foliage appears very early during spring, turning attractive deep red late in autumn.
The mildly fragrant flower heads, up to 6 inches across, appear during spring. They are pale pink at first turning white.
Hardy from zone 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on deep, fertile, well drained soil. Propagation is from softwood cuttings taken during summer.


* photo from unknown source on internet

* photo taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore College, PA

* photo taken on Apr 14 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 14 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken on Apr 20 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 3 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken on May 5 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 6 2015 in Ellicott City, MD







Viburnum carlesii ( Korean Spice Viburnum )
A very beautiful, moderate growing, dense, rounded, medium-sized, deciduous shrub native to Korea and Japan. It is rare in the wild. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 3 feet; 10 years - 5 x 6 feet ( avg ); largest on record - 13 x 13 ( averaging 6 ) feet.
The oval leaves, up to 5.5 x 3 inches, are bronze at first, turning to dull deep green above, pale gray-downy beneath. The foliage turns to red during autumn.
The very fragrant flowers, up to 0.5 inches across, are borne on dense rounded clusters up to 5 inches across. They are pink in bud, opening to white, appearing with the foliage during early spring.
They are followed by bluish-black berries, up to 0.3 inches long.
Zone 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on deep, fertile, acidic, well drained soil. It prefers a sheltered site north of zone 5. Deer resistant. Propagation is from seed sown during autumn or for the cultivars - softwood cuttings taken during early summer.

* photos taken on April 4 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photo taken on Nov 6 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 11 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 24 2015 in Columbia, MD





* photo taken on Oct 22 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Nov 2 2015 in Columbia, MD



'Aurora'
Compact and rounded reaching up to 6 x 6 feet in 10 years, eventually reaching as much as 8 x 8 feet.
It is similar to V. carlesii but the intense spicey fragrant flowers are red in bud opening to pink.
The foliage is bright green instead of bronze during early spring. It turns an excellent red-purple during autumn.

* photo taken on Apr 14 2013 in Columbia, MD




'Compactum'
Dense and compact; it reaches up to only 4 x 4 feet in 10 years, with an eventual maximum size of 6 x 6 feet.
The very healthy, dark green foliage turns wine-red during autumn.
The sweetly-fragrant flowers are pink-red in bud opening to white.

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Diane'
Foliage purplish at first during spring, turning to deep green than finally deep red in fall.
The flowers are deep pink.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Nov 2 2015 in Columbia, MD


Viburnum cassinoides ( Withe-Rod Viburnum )
A moderate growing, rounded, large, deciduous shrub reaching around 15 feet in height. Some records include: largest on record - 27 x 17 feet; 5 years - 6 feet; fastest growth rate - 1.5 feet. It is native to moist forests and swamps in eastern North America ( from Manitoba to Hearst, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to eastern Wisconsin to northern Indiana to northeast Alabama to South Carolina in mountains to northern Delaware ). It is closely related to Viburnum nudum. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was only known from Detroit where common during the 1800s.
The attractive foliage is deep bronze at first during spring, turning dull deep green in summer then to red and purple during autumn. The thick, finely-toothed, oval leaves, are up to 6 x 3.5 ( rarely over 4 ) inches in size.
The white flowers, up to 0.2 inches wide, are borne in flat-top clusters up to 6 inches across, during late spring.
They are followed by deep blue to black fruit, up to 0.3 inches long, ripening late summer and persisting to early autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 6 it enjoys cool climates, it only thrives on high elevations south of Pennsylvania. It is flood tolerant and recommended for flood plain areas in both sun and shade.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Viburnum 'Cayuga' ( Cayuga Viburnum )
A hybrid between Viburnum carlesii & Viburnum x carcephalum. It forms a moderate growing, very dense, medium to large shrub, up to 13 x 13 feet. The oval leaves are deep green, turning to orange-red during autumn. The attractive foliage is leaf spot and mildew resistant. The fragrant, bright pink to white ( pink in bud ) flowers are borne on abundant clusters up to 5 inches across. They are followed by purple to black berries.
Hardy from zone 4b to 8

* photo taken on Mar 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum


* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Viburnum cinnamomifolium ( Cinnamon Leaf Viburnum )
A spreading, evergreen, large shrub to small tree, reaching up to 16 x 13 feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 27 x 27 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The leathery, pointed-oblong leaves, up to 8 x 2 inches, are deep green above, pale beneath. Cinnamon Leaf Viburnum looks very much like an oversized Viburnum davidii.
The white flowers, borne on clusters up to 7 inches across, are unscented and open during summer.
They are followed by glossy blue-black berries, up to 0.25 inches wide.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade, preferring moist, acidic, well drained soil. It should be sheltered from sun and wind. It is more heat tolerant in southeastern U.S. than similar looking but much smaller Viburnum davidii

* photos taken @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C. on Feb 2009

* photo taken on 4th of July 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC




Viburnum corylifolium ( Hazel Leaf Viburnum )
A moderate growing, medium-sized shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 10 feet, that is native from the Himalayas to western China.
The rounded leaves, up to 3 inches, are densely hairy.
The white flowers, borne on clusters, up to 3 inches across, are followed by red, rounded berries.
Hardy zones 6 +.

Viburnum cotinifolium ( Smoketree-Leaf Viburnum )
A moderate growing, rounded, large deciduous shrub, reaching up to 15 x 15 feet, that is native to high mountains from Afghanistan, south to Kashmir to Bhutan.
The rounded leaves, up to 5 x 3.5 inches, resembles that of Viburnum lantana. The foliage is gray-green above, silvery-white woolly beneath, it has long lasting deep red fall color.
The pinkish-white ( pink in bud ) flowers are borne on clusters up to 3 inches across during late spring.
They are followed by red berries which later turn black.
Hardy zones 6 + in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil.

Viburnum cylindricum
A spectacular, fast growing, evergreen tree native to China. It can reach 20 x 13 feet in 20 years and eventually grow to as much as 50 feet tall and 30 feet wide with a trunk diameter slightly over 1 foot.
The deep blue-green foliage is large, up to 9 x 4 inches.
The flowers are white and borne in rayed clusters up to 5 inches across during summer.
They are followed by black fruit.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 in partial to full shade on fertile, well drained soil.

Viburnum davidii ( David's Viburnum )
A slow growing, low mounded evergreen Viburnum native to western China. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 2 feet; 5 years - 3.3 x 3.3 feet; largest on record - 5.5 x 13 ( rarely over 3 x 5 ) feet.
The leathery leaves, up to 6 x 3 inches in size have 3 distinctive veins. The foliage is glossy deep green.
The fragrant, small, creamy-white flowers appear in stiff clusters, up to 4 inches across, during late spring.
They are followed by attractive, glossy blue, oblong berries, up to 0.25 inches across. The leaf and flower stems are often flushed red. Plants of both sexes need to be planted near each other to get the berries.
Hardy from zone 7 to 9 in sun or full shade, it grows better in the Pacific Northwest and western Europe than in the hot humid summers of the deep south. One has been reported growing in Detroit ( zone 6 ) however on an extremely sheltered site with a deep winter mulch ( Viburnum davidii is not recommended for the midwest ). Prefers fertile, deep, moist, well drained soil. Propagation is from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken on October 15 2010 in Crownsville, MD


* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD



'Longleaf'
Leaves almost double the size. The shrub also grows larger up to 7 feet tall and 10 feet across

Viburnum dentatum ( Arrowwood Viburnum )
A dense bushy deciduous shrub native to floodplain forests and swamps in eastern North America ( from central Iowa to Chicago, Illinois to Sarnia, Ontario to London, Ontario to Hamilton, Ontario to to upstate New York to New Brunswick; south to eastern Texas to northern Florida...it also occurs in Ontario along the St. Lawrence River from Kingston to near Ottawa and east to Brockville ). Its origanal natural range is uncertain in regions as there many wild populations found in Michigan which are most likely naturalized. It previously occurred in the wild at Point Pelee, Ontario but disappeared there during the late 1800s. It also occurred sporadically on the Ohio shore during that time. It can easily grow to 12 feet in height or more. Some records include: largest on record - 26 x 15 feet; fastest growth rate - 7 feet.
The coarsely-toothed, broadly-oval leaves are up to 6 x 4 inches in size. The leave appear early during spring. The very attractive foliage is deep green, turning to scarlet-red during autumn.
The fragrant, tiny white flowers appear in clusters, up to 5 inches across, during late spring.
They are followed by dark blue oval berries, ripening during early autumn, persisting into late fall.
Hardy zones 2 to 8.Recommended for Alberta, Canada despite being way outside its native range.

* photos taken on May 1 2010 in Howard County, MD


* photos taken on Nov 16 2012 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook



* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


* photos taken on May 6 2015 @ Cypressmeade Park, Ellicott City, MD


* photo taken on Oct 23 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Aug 20 2016 in Olney, MD


* photos taken Sep 18 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD



* photo taken on Apr 28 2017 in Ellicott City, MD

* historic archive photo

* photos taken on May 18 2017 in Columbia, MD




'Autumn Jazz'
Vigorous, bushy, upright, rounded in habit, reaching up to 10 x 12 feet in 10 years and eventually 12 x 14 feet.
The large, very deep green leaves turn to orange and deep red during autumn.
The deep blue berries are an attractive feature during autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8

* photos taken on May 27 2012 in Ellicott City, MD
* photos taken on July 30 2013 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on July 10 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 27 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Blue Muffin'
Smaller growing, dense and more compact, reaching up to 7 x 5 feet in 5 years, eventually reaching a maximum size of only 8 x 8 feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 4 feet.
The foliage is luxuriant glossy green, the abundant flowers are white and the berries are bright blue.
Extremely hardy ( to zone 3 ), thriving even in Alberta.


* photos taken on May 27 2012 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


'Chicago Lustre'
Vigorous, upright and rounded in habit, reaching up to 15 x 15 ( rarely over 12 ) feet. It reaches about 15 x 10 feet in 10 years.
The very glossy deep green foliage, ranges from golden-yellow to purple during autumn.
The abundant, deep blue berries are an attractive feature during autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

* photo taken on Nov 12 2016 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Aug 13 2017 @ Howard Comm. College, Columbia, MD





'Crimson Tide'
A very fast growing, bushy, upright, rounded in habit, reaching up to 12 x 12 feet.
The large, glossy green leaves turn intense red during autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 8

'Golden Arrow'
Foliage is glowing yellow during spring, remaining either yellow or deepening to lime-green during summer.
It is otherwise similar to the species though probably wont exceed 10 x 10 feet. Some records include: 6 years - 8 feet.
Hardy zones 3 + preferring light shade to avoid leaf scorch.

'Moonglow'
Reaches up to 8 feet tall and wide.
The glossy bright green leaves are the largest of any variety.
Hardy zones 2 to 8

'Northern Burgundy'
Dense and upright to rounded in habit, reaching up to 10 x 10 feet in 8 years and eventually to 15 x 12 feet.
The glossy deep green foliage has excellent deep red fall color that peaks in November.
Hardy zones 3 to 8

'Papoose'
A true dwarf, it is slow growing, upright, rounded; reaching up to 4 x 4 feet in 5 years, 7 x 6 feet in 8 years.
The foliage is bright green at first, turning to glossy deep green. The leaves turn to deep red during autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC


'Perle Bleu'
Vigorous, reaching up to 9 feet in 10 years and a maximum size of 12 x 12 feet. It bears exceptionally heavy crops of showy blue berries making this a great choice for attracting birds. It is otherwise similar to the species.
Hardy zones 3 +.

'Red Feathers'
The leaves are deep red during spring, turning to deep green. The foliage turns to red in autumn.
It is otherwise similar to the species.

Viburnum dilatatum ( Linden Viburnum )
A large, deciduous shrub, native to much of China, Korea and most of Japan. Some records include: fastest growth rate 5 feet; 2 years - 6 x 5 feet; 25 years - 20 feet; largest on record - 20 x 17 feet.
The large, sharply-toothed, broadly-oval, coarse leaves reach up to 6 x 7 inches. The foliage is glossy deep green in summer turning red in fall. The foliage appears early in spring.
The tiny creamy-white flowers, up to 0.2 inches wide, are borne in clusters up to 6 inches across, during late spring.
They are followed in abundance by oval, scarlet-red berries, up to 0.3 inches long, that are borne in clusters. They ripen during early autumn and may remain on the stems as late as February. Fruit production is most abundant when multiple cultivars are used together in a planting.
The fissured bark is grayish-brown.
Hardy from zone 5 to 8 ( with a few selections ranging into 4 ) in full sun to partial shade on deep, fertile, well drained soil. If you live in the northern parts of the U.S. it is important to choose the hardier clones. Deer resistant.
Very pest and disease resistant. Propagate from softwood cuttings taken during early summer.

* photos taken on May 1 2010 in Howard County, MD



* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD

* photos taken on June 1 2010 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Oct 14 2015 in Baltimore Co., MD


* photos taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD



'Asian Beauty'
Compact and upright medium-sized shrub with deep green foliage and white flowers that are followed by abundant, scarlet-red berries. The berries often persist through the winter.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 ( possibly even 4 on protected sites )

* photo taken on Oct 24 2014 in Howard Co, MD

* photo taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


'Cardinal Candy'
Smaller growing, dense and rounded in habit; reaching up to 10 x 10 feet.
The foliage is deep green.
The white flowers, borne in clusters up to 5 inches across, are followed by abundant, persistent, brilliant scarlet-red fruit. No pollinator is necessary for fruit production.
It is also VERY HARDY surviving as low as -35 F

* photos taken on October 15 2010 in Columbia, MD





* photos taken on Sep 14 2011 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on Oct 15 2011 in Columbia, MD



* photo taken on April 14 2010 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 13 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 14 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 12 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 18 2014 in Columbia, MD


'Catskill'
Compact and smaller growing to 8 feet tall and 10 feet wide. Good autumn color.

'Erie'
Coral-red fruit and autumn color. Can be large and tree like with age; reaching up to 20 x 17 feet though typically rarely over 8 x 12.
Very insect and disease resistant.

* photo taken on Oct 17 2014 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken on Nov 26 2016 in Columbia, MD


'Iroquois'
Bigger fruit and massive fruit set.
It is very vigorous, reaching up to 10 feet tall and 12 feet wide.
The leaves are also larger than average for the species.

'Michael Dodge'
Similar with large, golden-yellow fruit. Looks great with 'Cardinal Candy'.
The foliage turns to red in fall.

'Moonglow'
Huge leaves!

'Oneida'
Reaches up to 10 feet tall and wide though rarely exceeds 6 feet.
The profuse, white flowers borne during mid-spring ( often repeating later in summer ).
They are followed by scarlet-red berries, up to 0.4 inches wide each, that persist over most of winter.
Hardy zones 5 to 8

Viburnum edule ( Mooseberry )
A fast growing, large, deciduous shrub, that is native to deciduous woodlands, swamps and bogs in northern North America ( from far northern Alaska to far northwest Northwest Territories to Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories to Churchill, Manitoba to far northern Ontario to northern Quebec to Labrador & Newfoundland; south to Oregon to central Colorado to Minnesota to far northern Michigan to Tobermory, Ontario to Haileybury, Ontario to northern New York State to Maine ) as well as northeast Asia. It is endangered in California, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Michigan, New York State and Vermont. Some records include: largest on record - 15 x 15 feet with stem diameters up to 2 inches.
The paired, toothed, shallowly 3-lobed, rounded leaves are up to 5 x 5 inches in size. The attractive foliage is deep green above, paler green beneath; turning to scarlet-red during autumn.
The creamy-white flowers are borne on rounded clusters, up to 2.5 inches wide, during early summer.
They are followed by scarlet-red berries, up to 0.4 inches wide, during mid to late summer, often persisting well into the winter. The tasty berries are used in making jelly which is great for serving with Thanksgiving turkey.
Older stems have smooth reddish bark.
Extremely hardy and excellent for cold climates. Plants from northern seed sources should be hardy anywhere from zone 2 to 8 and survive - 50 F. It prefers partial shade.

* photo taken by http://www.nwplants.com

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Viburnum ellipticum ( Oregon Viburnum )
A deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 12 x 11 feet, that is native from Washington state to California ( mostly west of the Cascades Mountain Range except in southeast Oregon and the Sierra Nevadas ). It is similar in habit and foliage to Viburnum dentatum.
The toothed, elliptic to nearly rounded leaves, up to 3 x 2 inches, are glossy deep green above, bright green beneath. The leaves turn to red during autumn.
The white flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne on clusters up to 2.5 inches across.
They are followed by black berries, up to 0.3 inches long.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in sun to partial shade. It is not known to be growing anywhere in the eastern U.S. Oregon Viburnum is moderately tolerant of summer drought.

* photos taken by http://www.nwplants.com



Viburnum 'Emerald Triumph'
The hybrid of Viburnum burejeaticum & V. rhytidophyllum 'Alleghany'; this is a fast growing shrub that looks like Viburnum lantana and reaches up to 6.5 x 7 feet in 5 years; 12 x 10 feet in about 10 years. It may eventually reach up to 18 feet in height with great age.
The leathery, broadly-ovate leaves, are glossy deep green, turning to deep red or bronze during autumn.
The creamy-white flowers are borne on showy clusters, up to 3 inches across during late spring.
They are followed by fruits that turn to scarlet-red during late summer, ripening to black during autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 ( tolerating as low as - 40 F ) in full sun to partial shade, thriving even in much of Alberta. It is pest free and tolerates clay soils very well.

* photo from unknown source on internet


Viburnum erosum ( Beech Viburnum )
Also called Viburnum ichangense and Japanese Arrowwood. A moderate growing, upright, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 13 x 13 ( rarely over 8 ) feet, that is native to central and eastern China, Korea and Japan.
The toothed, ovate or oblong leaves, up to 5 x 1.5 inches in size, are glossy deep green; turning to orange and red during autumn. The foliage resembles that of Viburnum dentatum.
The white flowers, up to 0.2 inches wide, are borne on clusters, up to 4 inches wide, during late spring.
They are followed by abundant, edible, scarlet-red berries, up to 0.3 inches wide, ripening during late summer and persisting into mid-autumn.
The fissured bark is blackish-brown.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.

* historic archive photo


Viburnum erubescens
A semi-evergreen large shrub or small tree, reaching a maximum size of 20 x 15 feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 2 feet. It is native from the Himalayas to Sri Lanka.
The toothed, elliptical leaves, up to 4 x 2 inches, are somewhat downy below. The leafstalks are reddish.
The white flowers are carried on small pendulous clusters up to 5 inches across during summer.
They are followed by berries that are red turning to black.
Hardy from zone 6 to 11.

Viburnum 'Eskimo' ( Eskimo Viburnum )
A hybrid between V. carlesii 'Cayuga' & Viburnum utile; it makes a mounded, small, semi-evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 8.5 feet. Some records include: 5 years - 6 x 5 feet; 20 years - 10 x 8.5 feet. The leathery, ovate or oval leaves, up to 4 x 2 inches, are glossy deep green, turning to orange-red during autumn. South of zone 7, it may be evergreen. The flowers, up to 0.5 inches wide, are pink in bud, opening to white. They are carried in rounded clusters up to 4 inches across. The berries that follow are red turning to black.
It is hardy from zone 6 to 8 and is killed at - 15 F. It is leafspot resistant.

* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum


* photos taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC




Viburnum farreri ( Fragrant Viburnum )
Also known as Viburnum fragrans & Viburnum candidissimum; this is a winter blooming, fast growing, dense, upright, deciduous to semi-evergreen large shrub, that is native to the mountains of northern China. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 5 feet; 5 years - 10 x 6.5 feet; 10 years - 12 x 10 feet; largest on record - 17 x 17 feet.
The tapered-oval leaves, up to 4 x 3 inches, are bronze at first, turning to bright green with red veins and stalks. The leaves turn to deep red during autumn.
The sweetly-fragrant, white to pale pink flowers, up to 0.4 inches wide, appear in terminal clusters up to 2 inches across on bare wood. They appear in mild spells between late fall and spring. The flesh of the scarlet berries is edible but the stones are poisonous. They can appear late in the fall
The branches are brown.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 ( reports of 3 on very protected sites ) in full sun to partial shade on moist, deep, fertile, well drained soil. Generally disease resistant. Propagation is from sowing seed during autumn or softwood cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken on Mar 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum


Viburnum foetens
An open spreading, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 7 x 7 feet, that is native to mountain conifer forest of Kashmir. Some records include: 5 years - 6.5 x 6.5 feet.
The aromatic, large, broad-oval leaves are smooth and deep green.
The very fragrant flowers are pink in bud, opening to white. The flowers are borne in dense clusters during mild spells during winter from mid winter to early spring.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in partial shade on deep, fertile, well drained soil.
Propagation is from seed sown in autumn or softwood cuttings taken during summer.

Viburnum foetidum
An upright, large, evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum size of 15 x 15 feet, that is native from the Himalayas to western China. Some records include: 5 years - 7 feet.
The smooth-edged or toothed, broadly-oval or oblong leaves, up to 4 x 1.5 inches, sometimes have 3 small lobes near the tip. The foliage is reddish-purple at first, turning to glossy deep green.
The tiny, very fragrant white flowers are borne on clusters, up to 6 inches across, from January to March.
They are followed by showy red fruits, up to 0.5 inches wide, that last well into winter.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 on moist, fertile, well drained soil.

Viburnum furcatum ( Turtle-Leafed Viburnum )
A very large Viburnum, similar in appearance to Viburnum alnifolium. a large shrub to small tree, reaching up to 28 x 20 feet. It is a widespread native of southern and eastern China & the mountain of Japan. It is also native to Sakhalin and the Kuriles. Some records include: 5 years - 6.5 x 6.5 feet; largest on record - 33 feet.
The deeply-veined, broadly-ovate to rounded leaves, are up to 8 x 4.5 ( rarely over 5 ) inches in size. The corrugated foliage is bronze-purple at first, turning to bright green; finally turning to red & purple during autumn.
The white flowers are borne on clusters, up to 6 inches across, during mid to late spring.
They are followed by scalet-red berries, up to 0.5 inches wide, that later turn black, during late summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 5b to 8 ( seed source from Sakhalin is likely much hardier ) in sun or shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil.

Viburnum x globosum 'Jermyn's Globe'
A hybrid between Viburnum davidii & V. lobophyllum; it is a moderate growing, dense, rounded evergreen shrub, reaching up to 15 x 15 feet in size though usually half that. The heavily-veined, leathery leaves, up to 6 x 2.5 inches in size, are glossy green.
The heads of small white flowers that open from reddish buds are followed by small blue fruits.
Hardy from zone 6 to 8.

Viburnum harryanum ( Harry's Viburnum )
A rare, upright, evergreen shrub, reaching up to 10 x 10 feet, that is native to western China. Some records include: 4 years - 4 feet.
The privet-like leaves, up to 2 x 2 inches in size, are often held in whorls of 3. The foliage is deep green.
The tiny white flowers appear in flat clusters during late spring.
They are followed by shiny black berries.
Hardy zones 7 to 10.

Viburnum henryanum ( Henry Viburnum )
A very attractive, rare, large, evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum size of 15 x 15 feet, that is native to central China. This strikingly handsome viburnum can be pruned as a small tree. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 4.5 feet. The leathery, oblong leaves, up to 7.5 x 2 inches, are glossy deep green. The white flowers are borne on clusters up to 4 inches across during spring. The flowers attract butterflies.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on fertile, acidic, well drained soil.

* photos taken @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C. on Feb 2009



* photo taken on Mar 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


* photo taken on Feb 8 2014 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC





Viburnum x hillieri 'Winton'
A hybrid between Viburnum erubescens and Viburnum henryi; this is an evergreen large shrub reaching up to 20 feet tall and wide. Some records include: 10 years - 10 x 7 feet. The shallowly-toothed, elliptical leaves, up to 6 x 2.5 inches in size, coppery when young, turning deep green then to red during winter.
The creamy-white flowers are borne on abundant clusters, up to 3 inches across, during early summer.
The flowers attract butterflies.
They are followed by berries that are red turning black.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on fertile, well drained soil.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery



Viburnum hupehensis ( Hupeh Viburnum )
A Chinese native; this deciduous Viburnum forms a large shrub up to 20 feet tall and 15 feet wide.
The coarsely toothed, broad-elliptic leaves are up to 4 inches in length. The deep green foliage turns to scarlet-red during autumn.
Its white flowers are borne in clusters up to 2 inches across.
They are followed by red berries.
Hardy zones 4 + in full sun or partial shade.

Viburnum 'Huron'
The hybrid between Viburnum japonicum & V. lobophyllum. A dense, rounded, semi-evergreen shrub, reaching up to 8 x 15.6 feet. Some records include: 5 years - 4.5 feet; 20 years - 8 x 15.6 feet.
The luxuriant deep green foliage turns purple-red during late autumn.
The white flowers, borne on clusters up to 6 inches across, during late spring.
They are followed by a heavy crop of deep red fruit. Viburnum 'Chippewa' is a great pollinater, berry production is more abundant when the 2 are planted together.
Hardy zone 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade.

* photo taken on Apr 18 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photos taken @ U.S. National Arboretum on May 1 2010





Viburnum japonicum
A fast growing, dense, rounded, evergreen large shrub or small tree that is native to central & southern Japan as well as Taiwan. Some records include: largest on record - 42 x 50 feet with trunk diameter of 1.7 feet; fastest growth rate - 4 feet.
The leathery, shallowly-toothed, obovate leaves are up to 10 x 5 ( averaging half that ) inches in size. The foliage is very glossy rich deep green above, paler beneath; often turning deep purple during cold winter weather.
The tiny, strongly fragrant, white flowers, up to 0.5 inches wide, are produced on clusters, up to 5 inches across, during early summer.
They are followed by persistent, abundant, red berries, up to 0.4 inches, often lasting through the winter.
The bark is dark purplish-brown.
Hardy zone 7 to 9 ( tolerating 0 F ) in partial shade on acidic, moist, well drained soil.

'Chippewa'
Smaller in size, reaching only 10 x 10.5 feet; it also tends to be semi-evergreen.
The deep green foliage turns to red during late autumn.
The white flowers during late spring are followed by persistent deep red berries.
Hardy zones 6 to 9

* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD




'Variegatum'
The attractive foliage is heavily splashed yellow.

Viburnum x juddii ( Judd Viburnum )
A hybrid between Viburnum bitchiuensis & V. carlesii; it is a rapid growing, bushy, spreading, deciduous large shrub. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 feet; 3 years - 6 x 5 feet; 10 years - 8 x 8 feet ( avg ); largest on record - 15 x 13 feet.
The broad-oval leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are dull deep green, turning to purple-red in autumn. The foliage is leaf spot resistant.
The sweetly-fragrant flowers, up to 0.4 inches wide, are pink in bud opening to white. They are borne on abundant, large, rounded clusters, up to 3.5 inches across, during mid-spring.
Hardy from zone 4 to 8 in sun or shade on deep fertile soil. Propagated from softwood cuttings. Propagation is from softwood cuttings taken during early summer.

* photo from unknown source on internet


* photos taken on Sep 15 2013 in Howard Co., MD


* photos taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


* photos taken on Dec 3 2016 in Clarksville, MD




Viburnum kansuense ( Kansu Viburnum )
This Chinese native reaching up to 10 feet in height.
The deeply coarsely-toothed, 5-lobed leaves are up to 2 x 2 inches in size. The deep green foliage turns to red during autumn.
The pinkish-white flowers are borne in clusters up to 1.5 inches wide.
They are followed by red berries.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 Needs shade and acid soil.

Viburnum lantana ( Wayfaring Tree )
A vigorous, dense, rounded, deciduous large shrub or small tree native to most of Europe and northwest Asia. It can reach a maximum size of 20 x 17 feet.
The sharply-toothed, oval to oblong leaves, up to 5.5 x 4 inches, are dull green, turning to deep red during autumn.
The creamy-white flowers are borne on dense domed, terminal clusters up to 5 inches across, during late spring.
They are followed by red berries, up to 0.3 inches long, that later turn black. They appear mid-summer and often persist until early autumn.
The bark is light brown.
Hardy zone 2 to 6 ( Asian seed source likely hardy on the northern Great Plains ) in full sun to partial shade. It thrives on soils of high PH and is very drought tolerant. Deer resistant. Propagation is from softwood or semi-ripe cuttings under mist ( at 3000 to 5000 IBA ) easily rooting in 4 to 6 weeks.

* photo taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario

* photo taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON

* historic archive photo


'Aureum'
Reaches up to 8 feet, with bright golden-yellow foliage that turns to bright green by late summer.
The white flowers are borne in clusters up to 8 inches across.

'Mohican'
Similar to Viburnum lantanoides but with reddish-orange fruit maturing to black and growing very dense with darker foliage. The glossy deep green leaves are leaf spot resistant and can last well into November.
Dense, compact and rounded in habit, reaching a maximum size of 12 x 15 feet. Some records include: 5 years - 5.5 x 6 feet; 10 years - 8 x 9 feet.
Extremely hardy, this Viburnum even grows very well in Alberta, Canada's harsh climate.

* photos taken on Aug 3 2013 in Clinton, Ontario



‘Variegatum’
Reaches up to 15 x 12 feet with upright habit and extremely attractive, bold, fuzzy, yellow splashed variegated foliage that finally turns solid mid-green by late summer.
The masses of white, clustered flowers are followed by green-yellow then red then dark purple then blue-black, very attractive fruit display ( often multiple colored in the same cluster ). Looks truly outstanding when mixed with blue flowers or grown with Black Lace Elderberry or in front of Rivers Purple Beech!

* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD









Viburnum lentago ( Nannyberry )
Native to cool moist forests of northern North America ( from Alberta to southern Manitoba to International Falls, Minnesota to Thunder Bay, Ontario to Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Manitoulin Island to North Bay, Ontario to Chalk River, Ontario to New Brunswick; south to northern Wyoming to South Dakota to Iowa to central Ohio to northern Virginia ); this Viburnum grows as either a large shrub or a small tree. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was uncommon in the Canard River Valley, abundant at Point Pelee as well as the Lake Erie islands and the Ohio shore during thr 1800s. It was also common at Detroit during the presettlement era. It typically reaches up to 15 to 20 feet, however some are known to grow as high as 50 feet and up to 40 feet in spread. Trunk diameters up to 1.5 feet are known. It is also fast growing with growth rates sometimes as much as 4 feet. The branches are slender and are capped with long pointed buds that are highly visible in winter.
The broadly-oval leaves, up to 6 x 3 inches in size, are glossy deep green, turning to red or purple during autumn.
The fragrant, creamy white flowers, up to 1.3 inches wide, are borne on clustered fluffy heads up to 5 inches across during late spring.
They are followed by blue-black oval berries, up to 0.5 inches wide. The fruits persist into winter. The fruits are edible and tasty.
Hardy zones 2 to 6, thriving even in interior Alaska. Drought and shade tolerant.

* photos of unknown origin found on internet


* photos taken on August 4 2010 @ Birnam Woods Arboretum, Stratford, Ontario


* photo taken on Oct 17 2013 in Olney, MD

* Douglas Ladd @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / USDA SCS. 1989. Midwest wetland flora

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook




* photos taken on May 13 2015 in Pikesville, MD


* photos taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON


* historic archive photo


Viburnum lobophyllum
A large shrub, reaching a maximum size of 17 x 12 feet, that is native to western China. It is similar to Viburnum betulifolium in appearance having deep green leaves up to 5 x 3.5 inches in size.
The flower clusters are white and up to 4 inches across.
Hardy zones 5 +.

Viburnum luzonicum ( Luzon Viburnum )
A fast growing, large, semi-evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum height of 20 feet, that is native to southern China. Some records include: 5 years - 8 feet; 9 years - 15 x 8 feet..
The leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage turns intense red to deep purple during late autumn before falling during early winter.
The white flowers are followed by scarlet-red berries.
Hardy zones 6 to 9, very heat tolerant even in Texas. It is also drought tolerant. Easy to grow from cuttings.

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