Friday, January 22, 2016

Viburnum - part 2

Viburnum - Continued from part 1

Viburnum macrocephalum ( Chinese Snowball Tree )
This very fast growing, large Viburnum has spreading branches and can become a vase-shaped tree up to 20 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet. Some records include: 5 years - 10 feet; fastest growth rate - 6 feet.
The oval leaves, are up to 6 x 4 ( rarely over 4 ) inches in size. The leathery foliage is very glossy deep green above, downy beneath; remaining very late into fall or early winter ( evergreen in very mild winters ).
The winter flower buds are green and in spring open to white flowers on abundant large showy pompoms up to 9 inches across. In mild climates it will sometimes repeat bloom during late autumn. The flowers are usually sterile and do not produce fruit.
This Chinese native is generally free of pests and deer resistant. Hardy from zone 5 to 9. Drought tolerant.

subsp. keteleeri
Lace-cap flower clusters, up to 5 inches across, are followed by a spectacular show of scarlet-red berries.

* photo taken on Feb 8 2014 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC



* photo taken on Mar 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on April 18 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum


* photos taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


* photos taken on Mar 18 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD



'Sterile'
The largest flower clusters on any Viburnum are followed by no berries. It is otherwise identical to the species.

* photo taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


Viburnum molle ( Kentucky Viburnum )
Reaching up to 13 x 13 feet, this Viburnum resembles V. dentatum with its coarsely-toothed, ovate to rounded leaves, up to 5 x 4 inches. The foliage is lush deep green during summer, turning to deep red ( often mixed with yellow ) during autumn.
It is native from Iowa to southwest Ohio; south to Arkansas to Tennessee and is very rare through most of its range.
The white flowers are borne on clusters up to 4 inches across.
They are followed by blue-black berries.
Hardy zones 5 to 8.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


'Morton'
Similar with very attractive, exfoliating bark that resembles that of the Oakleaf Hydrangea.

Viburnum mongolicum ( Mongolian Viburnum )
A medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 8 x 6 feet, that is native to Mongolia and eastern Siberia.
The toothed, ovate leaves, up to 2.5 x 2 inches, are downy beneath.
The fragrant, white flowers are borne on flat open heads, up to 1.7 inches across, during spring.
They are followed by red berries that ripen to black.
Hardy zones 2 to 8.

Viburnum nudum ( Possum-haw Viburnum )
Native to rich woodlands and swamp forests in the eastern U.S. ( from Arkansas to Kentucky to CT; south to e TX to c FL ), this Viburnum forms a deciduous, erect, large shrub or more rarely a small tree. Typically reaching around 14 feet; some records include: largest on record - 33 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 inches: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet.
The minutely-toothed, oval leaves are up to 6.5 x 3 ( rarely over 5 ) inches in size. The luxuriant, very glossy deep green foliage turns to scarlet-red over a long season during autumn.
The creamy-white flowers are borne in clusters, up to 6 inches across, during early summer.
They are followed by blue-black fruit, ripening early autumn, persisting into mid-autumn. Fruit production is often sparse on lone plants.
Hardy zones 3 to 9, this Viburnum is very flood tolerant.

* photo taken on Aug 20 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Oct 17 2013 in Olney, MD

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014




* photo taken on July 11 2016 in Ellicott City, MD


'Brandywine'
Luxuriant glossy green foliage turns intense deep red during autumn.
Abundant berries turn to pink then blackish-blue during autumn. Berry set is abundant even without a pollinator.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on Oct 1 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC


* photos taken on Oct 2 2016 in Bel Air, MD


* photo taken on Oct 17 2016 in Annapolis, MD

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Count Pulaski'
Rapid growing with huge flower clusters up to 10 inches across.

'Winterthur'
Dense in habit, reaching up to 12 x 12 feet or more rarely up to 15 feet in height.
The very glossy green foliage turns scarlet-red during late autumn often lasting into December.
It will fruit without a pollinater but not as profusely.


* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD

* photos taken on June 13 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 10 2014 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken on Nov 12 2016 in Annapolis, MD



Viburnum obovatum ( Walter Viburnum )
A large shrub to small tree that is native from Alabama to South Carolina and south. Some records include: largest on record - 32 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 inches; fastest growth rate - 5 feet.
It is early leafing out in spring and the foliage turns to purple during late autumn. The leaves are small reaching only 2.5 x 1.5 inches in size. This Viburnum is evergreen if temperatures do not go below 15 F.
Hardy zones 6 to 9. It grows in sun or shade and is both flood and drought tolerant.

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Christmas Snow'
Low and compact in habit, reaching up to 3.5 x 5.3 feet in 5 years, eventually up to around 6 x 8 feet ( est. )
The evergreen foliage turns deep red during winter.
The very abundant, white flowers are borne early Autumn until frost.

'Mrs Shiller's Delight'
Dwarf and compact in habit.

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014





'St Paul'
Is more evergreen with pendulous branches.

Viburnum odoratissimum ( Sweet Viburnum )
Evergreen fast growing small tree native from the Himalayas to China to Japan; south to India, Burma and the Phillipines. It grows very dense and has a stocky low branching trunk with warty bark. Sweet Viburnum can reach a maximum size of 33 x 27 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot. Some records include: 4 years - 10 feet.
The thick, large, oval leaves, up to 8 x 4 inches, are glossy bright green above, paler green beneath.
The fragrant, pure white flowers are held in pyramid shape terminal panicles up to 6 inches in length.
They are followed by oval berries, up to 0.5 inches wide, that are red maturing to black.
Hardy from zone 7 to 10; it is known to survive up to -10 F however loosing all its foliage below 0 F.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on Mar 18 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Red Tip'
Has reddish new leaves.

Viburnum oliganthum
An evergreen shrub to small tree, reaching up to 20 x 8 feet, that is native to western China.
The thick, fleshy, leathery, oblanceolate to oblong leaves, up to 5 x 1.5 inches, are intense luxuriant mid-green.
The white flowers are borne on hanging clusters during spring, then sporadically during summer. They are followed by fruits that are red, later turning to black.
The bark is gray-brown.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in full sun to partial shade with occasional deep watering during summer.

Viburnum opalus ( European Highbush Cranberry )
A widespread native from most of Europe to Siberia south to Algeria; this versatile Viburnum is also commonly planted in temperate regions all over the world. A fast growing, rounded, deciduous shrub, reaching around 14 feet on average. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 7 feet; 5 years - 13 x 13 feet; largest on record - 32 x 32 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 inches.
The leaves, resembling that of the Acer rubrum Red Maple, are up to 6.5 x 6.5 inches in size. The 3 to 5 lobed foliage is deep green above, paler beneath, turning deep red in autumn.
The white flowers appear in clusters up to 6 inches across, during late spring.
They are followed by an abundant crop of 0.5 inch, shiny, translucent, scarlet berries lasting from August to January. The fruits are edible but bitter.
The bark is light gray, smooth and thin.
Hardy from zone 2 to 8!!! Flood tolerant and grows well in sun or part shade on deep, moist, fertile soil. Excellent choice for swampy areas as well as hedgerow plantings. Tolerant of wet soil and any soil PH from 5 to 8. Also grows very well in Alberta, Canada with its extreme range of temperatures.

* photos taken @ U.S. National Arboretum on May 1 2010

* photo taken on May 11 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 30 2014 in Columbia, MD



* photo taken on Jul 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON

* historic archive photo


'Aureum'
This cultivar has bright yellow spring foliage turning to yellow-green during summer.
It is stunning during late summer when the foliage contrasts with the scarlet-red berries.
The foliage is easily scorched in full sun.

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD



'Compactum'
Only reaches up to 4 x 4 feet in 5 years, eventually reaching a maximum size of 8 x 13 feet ( rarely over 5 feet ). The foliage is dense and luxuriant deep green; often turning to red during autumn.
Extremely hardy, it thrives even in Alberta.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery



'Leonard's Dwarf'
Compact in habit, reaching up to 4 feet.
The profuse white flowers are followed by red fruits.
Hardy zones 3+

'Nanum'
It is a miniature with a dense multi- stemmed habit, reaching up to 5 feet tall and wide at most; usually closer to 3 feet. Some records include: 10 years - 2 x 3 feet.
The leaves are small and crowded.
Being that this clone rarely flowers and fruits there really isn't much point to grow it.

'Nutcutt's Variety'
Tall and vigorous cultivar.
The foliage colors well in the fall.
The large red berries last well into winter.

* photos taken on Dec 10 2015 in Columbia, MD




'Roseum'
A sterile clone that has large showy greenish-white flower clusters that look like snow balls which appear along with the foliage in mid-spring. It does not fruit but is similar in size and foliage to Viburnum opalus.
The deep green foliage turns deep purplish-red in fall.
Vigorous growing and extremely hardy, it thrives even in Alberta.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photo taken on Sep 10 2014 in Elkridge, MD

* photo taken on May 16 2015 in Elkridge, MD


'Xanthocarpum'
Mid green leaves and white flowers; this cultivar is unusual in having yellow, shiny, semi-translucent berries.
It is otherwise similar to the species.

Viburnum orientale
Growing to 8 feet in height; this Viburnum resembles Viburnum acerifolium but is native to western Asia ( Turkey to the Caucasus ) and is more vigorous.
Hardy zones 5 +.

Viburnum phlebotrichum A rounded, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 8 ( rarely over 7 ) feet, that is native to woodland edge in mountains of central & southern Japan.
The oppositely-arranged, toothed, ovate leaves are up to 4 inches in length. The glossy bright green foliage turns to scarlet-red during autumn. The leaves resemble that of Viburnum raffinesquianum.
The pinkish-white flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne in clusters during mid to late spring.
They are followed by glossy, scarlet-red berries during mid-autumn. A genetically non-identical plant is required nearby for good berry production.
Hardy zones 5 ot 8 in full sun to partial shade on just about any moist, fertile, well drained soil.

Viburnum plicatum ( Doublefile Viburnum )
A vigorous deciduous shrub with tiered branches, averaging around 10 feet, that is native to China and Japan. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 6 feet; largest on record - 20 x 27 feet.
The very leathery. heavily pleated above, toothed, oval leaves are up to 7 x 4 inches in size. The foliage is bright green in spring then very deep green in summer then turning to deep red in autumn sometimes persisting through the winter. This Viburnum is early leafing out in spring. The leafstalks as well as the stems are beige and furry.
The late spring flowers are borne in flat clusters of cream fertile flowers surrounded by much larger pure white sterile flowers. These last 1 - 2 months sometimes fading to dull pink. The flowers attract butterflies.
They are followed by small red berries turning to blue-black.
The bark is grayish-brown.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 ( hardiest seed source does survive in Ottawa, Canada ) in full sun to partial shade on moist, deep, fertile, well drained soil. Propagation is from softwood cuttings taken during early summer.
Deer resistant and tolerates seashore conditions.

* photo taken on Apr 15 2010 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 2 2014 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on May 5 2015 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on May 6 2015 @ Cypressmeade Park, Ellicott City, MD






* photos taken on Oct 19 2015 in Howard Co., MD



'Cascade'
A horizontally branched shrub, reaching up to 10 x 12 feet.
The foliage is deep green.
The lacecap flower clusters are up to 4 inches across.
Hardy zones 4+ ( tolerating -30 F ).

'Fireworks'
Purple-red fall foliage complimented with reddish-black berries.

'Grandiflorum'
Large white flowers turning to pink.

'Kerns Pink'
A layered shrub, reaching up to 10 x 10 ( rarely over 8 x 8 ) feet.
The deep reddish-green foliage turns deep red during autumn.
The flowers are pale pink.
Hardy zones 5+

'Mariesii'
Large flat, lace-cap heads or mostly sterile flowers. Rarely fruits.
The branching habit is horizontal overlapping. Known to grow as large as 20 feet in height and 27 feet across.
The foliage turns intense purplish-red in fall.
It can tolerate - 30 F.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery



* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD





* photos taken on May 9 2015 in Elkridge, MD




* photos taken on Apr 26 2016 in Columbia, MD







* historic archive photo


'Mary Milton'
A shrub, reaching up to 10 x 15 feet, that is similar to V. plicatum 'Pink Sensation' but with deeper pink, snowball flowers.
The foliage is reddish at first, turning glossy deep green.

* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Newport'
A moderate growing, semi-dwarf, dense, compact form, reaching up to 5 x 9 feet in 20 years, eventually slightly more. It is a great choice for the smaller urban garden.
The deeply-veined foliage is smaller than that of the species, up to 3 inches in length. The attractive foliage turns to deep red during autumn.
The showy, white flower clusters are also smaller than the species, up to 3 inches across, but are very abundantly produced.
This cultivar is sterile, therefore not producing berries.
Hardy zones 4 +

* photos taken on Mar 18 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD



'Ogon'
A slow growing dwarf, reaching a maximum size of 6 feet.
The smaller golden-yellow leaves are up to 3 inches in length.
The foliage turns intense orange during autumn.
The white flowers are followed by orange-red fruit.
Hardy zones 5+

'Pink Beauty'
Reaches up to 12 x 13 feet; this cultivar has white flowers aging to pink.
The foliage is purplish-green.

'Pink Sensation'
Reaches up to 10 x 10 feet, with foliage that is purplish during spring, turning to deep green. The foliage turns to red during autumn.
The mid-pink flowers are borne on dense snowball clusters up to 3 inches across.
Hardy zones 4a+

'Popcorn'
Only reaches up to 10 x 7 ( often much smaller ) feet, it is less spreading in habit than most other cultivars. Some records include: 5 years - 6.5 x 6.5 feet.
It bears very profuse but smaller flower clusters.
The flowers are followed by red berries.
The deep green foliage turns to red during autumn.
Hardy north to zone 5a ( tolerates -23 F ).

* photos taken on May 1 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 29 2013 in Clarksville, MD


'Roseum'
White flowers aging to pink.

'Shasta'
Reaches up to 10 x 10 feet in 5 years, eventually up to 13 x 17 feet, sometimes becoming a small tree.
The white flowers clusters, up to 6 inches across, are followed by dark red berries complimented by deep purple-red autumn color.
Tolerates as low as -30 F.

* photos taken on April 23 2010 in Ellicott City, MD



* photos taken on May 11 2011 in Columbia, MD






* photo taken on May 15 2013 in Ellicott City, MD


'Shoshoni'
A compact version of 'Shasta' reaching a maximum size of 6 x 11.2 feet in 20 years, eventually slightly more.
The abundant flowers are followed by long-lasting berries.
Hardy zones 4 +.

'Sterile'
Has no berries. Bushy shrub with spreading branches.

'Summer Snowflake'
Moderate growing, reaching up to 8 x 10.5 feet in 20 years or very rarely 18 x 12 feet in size with great age. It has a strongly tiered habit and purple-red fall foliage.
The white flowers appear over a very long season from May to October and are followed by red berries.

* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


* photo taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


Viburnum x pragense ( Pragense Viburnum )
A very fast growing, large round bushy evergreen shrub that is the hybrid bwtween Viburnum rhytidophyllum and Viburnum utile. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 5 feet; largest on record - 16 x 15 ( rarely over 10 ) feet.
It has very interesting foliage that is narrow and up to 5 x 1.5 inches. The leaves are very glossy, dark green and wrinkled above, white felted beneath.
The tiny pink in bud opening to creamy white flowers are borne during spring in densely packed heads up to 6 inches across.
Hardy from zone 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade; no leaf burn is reported at - 6 F though it does become deciduous at - 17 F. Alkaline soil tolerant; it grows best on deep, rich soil. Deer resistant.

* photos taken on May 1 2010 in Howard County, MD


* photo taken on April 9 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photos taken on June 8 2012 in Ellicott City, MD
* photos taken on May 1 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 15 2013 in Ellicott City, MD


* photo taken on Nov 3 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 23 2014 in Ellicott City, MD


* photo taken on Nov 3 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 25 2015 in Ellicott City, MD


* photos taken on Dec 9 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

















* photo taken on July 6 2016 in Elkridge, MD

* photo taken on Apr 1 2017 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Apr 15 2017 in Ellicott City, MD


* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photos taken on May 18 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 19 2017 in Ellicott City, MD



Viburnum propingum
An evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum size of 18 x 12 feet, that is native to central and western China and also Taiwan.
The entire, ovate leaves, up to 4 x 2 inches, are very glossy deep green.
The tiny greenish-white flowers are borne in clusters up to 3 inches across in late spring and are followed by blue-black berries.
The stems are reddish.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 ( tolerating 0 F ) in full sun to partial shade on moist, well drained soil. It is easy to propagate from cuttings.

* photos taken @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C. on Feb 2009



Viburnum prunifolium ( Black Haw )
A moderate growing, spreading picturesque small tree from eastern North America ( Iowa and southern Wisconsin to southern Michigan to New York's Hudson Valley and Connecticut; south to central Kansas to southeast Texas to Savvanah, GA. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was only known from the Ohio shore and Detroit, Michigan where common during the 1800s. Some records include: 20 years - 30 x 20 feet.. Some ancient trees as large as 50 feet tall; 33 feet in width with trunk diameters of 2 feet have been reported though rare.
The finely-toothed, oval leaves are up to 4 x 2.3 inches in size. The foliage is glossy deep green, often turning to scarlet-red during autumn.
The twigs have prominent reddish flower buds through the winter that open into white flat-topped flower clusters up to 4.5 inches across during late spring.
The yellow-green berries ripen to bluish-black during mid-summer. They often persist into late fall. The fruits often taste like Dates and are better after frost. The seeds are large so it is best to cook them by bringing them to a boil, simmering for 30 minutes, then putting them through a strainer to remove the seeds. The pulp can be used in pies, sauces and preserves.
It is pest and disease free and hardy from zone 3 to 9 ( tolerating as low as - 40 F ) in full sun to partial shade. Thriving on just about any well drained soil, it is tolerant of drought, wet soil, clay, salt and pollution. Clones from central Oklahoma and Kansas could be selected for superior heat and drought tolerance.

* photo taken on April 18 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum

* photos taken on Mar 8 2013 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Apr 11 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 1 2013 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Oct 31 2013 @ Hampton Ntl. Historic Site, Towson, MD




* photo taken on Oct 24 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken @ Middle Patuxent, Clarksville, MD on Apr 24 2015



* photos taken on May 3 2015 in Ellicott City, MD


* photos taken Aug 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photo taken on Sep 21 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 9 2016 in Annapolis, MD

* photos taken on Apr 14 2017 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD




* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD





* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD




* historic archive photo

* excellent video found on youtube

'Forest Rouge'
Upright in habit, with excellent very long-lasting, deep red fall color. It is otherwise similar to the species.
Hardy zones 3 +, this cultivar was developed in Wisconsin.

Viburnum raffinesquianum ( Downy Arrowwood )
Looking alot like Viburnum dentatum; this Viburnum is native from southern Manitoba to Sioux Lookout, Ontario to Thunder Bay, Ontario to Manitoulin Island to Tobermory and Killarney Ontario to Chalk River, Ontario to southern Quebec; south to Missouri to central Indiana to Maryland ( and Georgia in the Appalachian Mountain Range ). In Ontario..it is absent from most of the Haliburton highlands. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was uncommon along the Canard River Valley, at Point Pelee, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It reaches up to 10 x 10 feet and makes a good hedge. Downy Arrowwood is typically found in open dry upland woods in the wild.
The deeply-veined, coarsely-toothed, ovate leaves, up to 3.5 x 2.2 inches in size, appear early during spring. The foliage is deep green above, paler green beneath; turning to scarlet-red during autumn.
The creamy-white flowers are borne in abundant clusters, up to 3 inches across, during late spring.
They are followed by bluish-black berries, up to 0.3 inches long, during late summer into early autumn.
Hardy from zone 2 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on just about any well drained soil. Heat and drought tolerant.

* photos taken on Oct 23 2015 in Ellicott City, MD





* photo taken on July 31 2016 in Howard Co., MD


'Louise's Sunbeam'
Glossy bright golden-yellow foliage that turns to red-purple during autumn.

Viburnum x rhytidophylloides 'Alleghany' ( Alleghany Viburnum )
A hybrid between Viburnum rhytidophyllum & V. lantana; it is fully deciduous in cold climates but is nearly evergreen in more milder ones. A fast growing, dense, upright, large shrub or small tree; this Viburnum can reach up to 20 feet tall and wide.
The narrowly-oval leaves, up to 8 x 3 inches in size, are glossy deep green above and paler below. Leaf spot resistant.
The creamy flowers are borne on clusters during late spring.
They are followed by red berries that ripen to black.
Hardy from zone 4 to 9 in full sun or partial shade. Deer resistant.

* photo taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore College, PA

* photos taken on May 1 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 19 2015 in Howard Co., MD






* photo taken on Nov 28 2015 in Dauphin, PA

* photos taken on July 31 2016 in Howard Co., MD


* photo taken on Dec 3 2016 in Clarksville, MD


'Dart's Duke'
The leaves are huge; up to 14 inches in length. The flower clusters are also huge up to 10 inches across.

'Holland'
About the same as Alleghany.

'Willowwood'
Extremely vigorous with deep green foliage.
Hardy north to zone 4

* photo taken on March 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum

* photos taken on Aug 20 2011 @ Audubon Sanctuary, Montgomery Co, MD



Viburnum rhytidophyllum ( Leatherleaf Viburnum )
A very fast growing, semi-evergreen to evergreen, broad, upright large shrub or small tree, that is native to western and central China. Some records include: 5 years - 13 x 11 feet; largest on record - 30 x 30 feet. It makes an excellent screening plant.
The deeply-veined, corrugated, long, narrow, leathery leaves, up to 10 x 3 inches, are glossy deep green above, gray or yellowish woolly beneath.
The flower buds are conspicuous in the fall and winter then in the late spring bear dense, large terminal clusters up to 9 inches across of creamy-white flowers.
They are followed by oval red berries that ripen to black.
Both male and female plants are required for good berry production which will add even more to an already spectacular plant.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in sun or shade on deep, fertile, well drained soil.
10 F will kill the leaves but the stems will survive temps down to - 15 F; and lower temps it can dieback to the ground but should resprout in the spring. Deer resistant and tolerant of deep shade. Thrives on both very acidic and very alkaline soils. Propagated from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken on April 18 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore College, PA

* photo taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


'Cree'
Leaves stay green and don't roll up in winter, otherwise similar.

'Roseum'
Intense pink-red flowers

* photo taken July 2007 in Columbia, MD


Viburnum rigidum ( Canary Island Viburnum )
A moderate growing shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 10 feet, this evergreen Viburnum tends to be somewhat floppy in habit.
The stiff, oval leaves, up to 6 x 3 inches, are very deep green.
The flowers are borne on white flat-topped terminal clusters up to 5 inches across.
They are followed by blue berries that later turn black.
Hardy from zone 8 b to 11; this Viburnum does not grow in much of the eastern U.S. or Midwest but does excellent in Cornwall, England & Ireland. Grows at Kew Gardens against a wall.

Viburnum rufidulum ( Rusty Black haw )
A slender, small tree, native to the eastern U.S. ( from central Oklahoma to eastern Kansas to northern Missouri to central Illinois to southern Ohio to central Maryland; south to central Texas to northern Florida ). Fast growing; it can form a 4 gallon size nursery plant in 8 months. Faster than average growth can be pushed with calcium nitrate. At maturity it can grow as large as 40 x 35 feet, with a trunk diameter up to 21 inches.
The oval leaves are up to 4 x 2.5 inches in size. The foliage is reddish-brown in spring turning to glossy deep green above and paler below in summer. The foliage turns to deep red during autumn.
The flowers are borne in white clusters up to 6 inches across with the foliage in mid spring.
They are followed by dark blue berries up to 0.5 inches long on red cluster stems.
The bark is similar to the native Persimmon with its square block pattern.
Tolerates sun or shade and is hardy from zone 4 to 9 ( survives as low as -32 F ). It is both very drought and very heavy clay tolerant. Recommended grown from seed since cutting grown plants tend to stay shrubby.

* photos taken Aug 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD





'Emerald Charm'
Considered to be more cold hardy.

'Royal Guard'
Compact in habit, reaching up to 15 x 11.4 in 20 years. Some records include: 8 years - 10 feet.
The very glossy deep green foliage turns intense deep red during autumn.

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD




Viburnum sargentii ( Sargent Viburnum )
A fast growing, large deciduous shrub or small tree, averaging around 15 feet, that is native to Siberia, far eastern Mongolia, China and northern & central Japan. Some records include: largest on record - 23 x 24 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.3 feet. It is usually found in mountain forests in the wild. It is related to Viburnum opulus and trilobatum. The dark gray bark is thick, fissured and corky. The branches are thick and heavy.
The leaves resemble that of Acer rubrum Red Maple, they are up to 7 x 5 inches in size. The foliage is bronze at first, turning to lush green during summer, then finally to orange and scarlet in the fall.
The creamy-white flowers are borne on 4 inch lacecap clusters during late spring.
They are followed by round semi-translucent scarlet berries, up to 0.4 inches wide, that persist into winter.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade and is flood tolerant. Thrives best where summers are cool.

* photos taken on May 18 2013 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken by Dr. Nick V. Kurzenko @ CalPhotos


subsp 'calvescens'
Moderate growing, rounded, denser and more compact than species, averaging 10 feet, reaching a maximum of 12 x 12 feet.
The flowers are exceptionally abundant.
The berries are even more intense scarlet-red than the species.

'Onondaga'
Deep purple spring foliage turns deep green in summer then back to purple in fall.
Vigorous growing, it can reach up to 5 x 3 feet in 5 years, eventually up to 12 x 8 feet.
Hardy north to zone 3, even thriving in Alberta.
* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Susquehanna'
Very vigorous; reaching up to 15 x 16 feet with a rounded growth habit.
It flowers heavily and bears abundant orange-red fruits.

* photos taken on May 1 2010 in Columbia, MD





Viburnum schensianum ( Shensi Viburnum )
A moderate growing, upright, rounded, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 12 x 10 ( rarely over 8 x 8 ) feet in size, that is native to central and eastern China. It is related to Viburnum lantana but is smaller in all its parts.
The broadly-ovate leaves, up to 3.2 x 1.8 ( rarely over 2 ) inches in length, are gray-green.
The white flowers are borne on clusters, up to 3.5 inches wide, during late spring.
They are followed by red, later ripening to blue-black berries, up to 0.3 inches long, during late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.

Viburnum setigerum ( Tea Viburnum )
A moderate growing, large, deciduous shrub reaching a maximum size of 14 x 13 ( rarely over 8 x 6 ) feet. Some records include: 10 years - 7 feet; fastest growth rate - 3 feet.
The large oval to oblong leaves, up to 7 x 3 inches, are deep green above and both slightly woolly and paler below. The foliage turns purple in the fall complimenting the very showy, glistening orange fruit.
The flowers are tiny in clusters, up to 2 inches across, on new wood during late spring. The flowers attract butterflies.
The showy berries ( up to 0.5 inches each ) that follow persist over most of winter.
Hardy from zone 4 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. Deer resistant.

* photo taken on Apr 18 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photos taken on Aug 30 2012 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD



* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD



* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 in Columbia, MD



Viburnum sieboldii ( Siebold Viburnum )
A fast growing, rounded, sturdy, deciduous, large shrub or small tree that is native to central and southern Japan. Some records include: largest on record - 34 x 32 feet with a gnarled trunk diameter of 1.5 feet.
The prominently-veined, toothed, oblong leaves are up to 8 x 4 inches in size. The foliage is glossy deep green above and paler green beneath. The foliage turns purple-red in late fall ( often December ). The young growth is downy.
The tiny creamy-white flowers, up to 0.4 inches long, are borne on clusters up to 6 inches across during late spring.
They are followed by large, red berries that later turn to black, during late summer into early autumn.
The shallowly-fissured bark is grayish-brown.
Hardy zones 4a to 7 ( possibly 3 on protected sites ) in full sun to partial shade, it is PH tolerant. It grows well even in Minnesota. It is considered to be deer resistant.

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 in Washington, DC




* historic archive photo


'Ironclad'
Tall and upright to 12 x 8 feet in 10 years. The leaves are large, to 6 inches, handsome, clean, thick, prominently veined, very glossy dark green. They turn dark burgundy in fall. Covered in creamy-white flower clusters in summer which later turn to red - black berries.
Zone 4a to 7, very tolerant of environment extremes. It makes a great hedge in Midwestern North America.

* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD



'Seneca'
A huge Viburnum reaching up to 40 feet tall. The large white flower clusters are followed by berries that last far longer than average for the species persisting up to 3 months. They are red turning to black

* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Mar 23 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Mar 18 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Obovatum'
Huge leaves, up to 10 inches in length.

'Wavecrest'
Vigorous with large leaves that turn to glowing orange-red during autumn.

Viburnum suspensum ( Ryukyu Viburnum )
A fast growing evergreen Viburnum reaching up to 14 x 12 feet, that thrives in the Deep South and Florida. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 4 feet. It is native to Okinawa Island in Japan where it is endangered.
The leathery, oblong leaves are up to 5 x 3 inches in size. The very lush tropical looking foliage is glossy deep green above, paler beneath.
The small, white, fragrant flowers, up to 0.2 inches long, are borne on clusters up to 4 inches across during summer.
They are followed by red berries, up to 0.3 inches wide, that later turn to black.
Hardy zones 8 to 11 in full sun or partial shade; it does resprout after freezing back to roots at 0 F. Reported to be 6 feet tall at NC State Arboretum. It is great for seashore conditions, being tolerant of heat, drought, pure sand and salt spray.

Viburnum tinus ( Laurustinus )
A tough, rapid growing, dense, bushy, large evergreen shrub native from the Mediteranean to southeast Europe. It has naturalized locally in the British Isles. It has been a popular hedge for centuries and can reach 10 feet tall in 5 years and is known to grow as large as 23 x 23 feet with great age though usually about half that.
The pointed, oblong leaves, up to 3 ( rarely 5 ) inches in length, persist up to 3 years. The foliage is glossy deep green.
The pink in bud opening to white flowers, are borne on flat clusters, up to 4 inches across. They appear late winter and often persist until late spring.
They are followed by glossy deep blue berries, up to 0.25 inches long.
Hardy zones 7 b to 9 in sun or shade on deep well drained soil. Clay, alkaline and salt tolerant; it grows well with coastal conditions and is also somewhat tolerant of summer drought. In the U.S. it is usually found on the Pacific Coast and in the Southeast. Deer resistant. Do not fertilize during late summer or autumn as late growth may get freeze damage.

* photos taken on Sep 2 2015 in Columbia, MD




'Clyne Castle'
A large growing form that is hardy with large glossy leaves.

'Eve Price'
A large growing from, with long leaves and pink flowers. Hardier than species to zone 7a ( 6b on protected sites with minor winter damage )

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery



* photo taken on Sep 2 2015 in Columbia, MD


'French White'
Very large tree from with very large white flowers.

'Ludidum'
Vigorous to 12 feet tall and wide.
The large leaves, up to 8 inches in length, are very glossy green.
Large flowers in 6 inch clusters. Each flower is up to 0.5 inches across, double the typical size for Viburnum tinus.

'Purpureum'
Purple new foliage.

'Spring Bouquet'
Compact and rounded, reaching at most 12 x 12 ( rarely over 7 ) feet. Abundant pink opening to white flowers from winter through spring are followed by dark blue summer fruit.

* photo taken on July 6 2016 in Elkridge, MD


'Variegatum'
Yellow margined foliage

Viburnum trilobum ( American Highbush Cranberry )
Also called Viburnum opalus var trilobum. A large deciduous shrub, averaging around 15 feet, that is native to moist woods and floodplains in northern North America ( from Prince George, British Columbia to Peace River, Alberta to Fort McMurray, Alberta to The Pas, Manitoba to Sioux Lookout, Ontario to Lansdowne House, Ontario to Moosonee, Ontario to Sept-Iles, Quebec to Newfoundland; south to Washington State to Montana to North Dakota to Iowa to central Indiana to northern New Jersey ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it occurred sporadically in the Great Swamp in northern Essex County as well as on the Ohio shore during the 1800s. Some records include: largest on record - 32 x 31 feet with a trunk diameter of 0.8 feet; fastest growth rate - 6 feet. The heavily-toothed, 3-lobed, broadly oval leaves, up to 5.5 x 5 inches in size, are shaped somewhat like that of the Acer rubrum Red Maple. Foliage is glossy deep green above, hairy paler green beneath; turning to deep red or purple during autumn.
The white flowers are borne on showy flat-topped clusters, up to 4 inches across, during late spring.
They are followed by scarlet edible berries, up to 0.6 inches long, that often remain and keep their color until spring.
The pectin rich fruits are edible and are rich in Vitamin C. They are a bit sour in taste but can be used in juices, sauces, preserves and jellies. The fruits can also be made into wine if fermented.
The bark is usually smooth and gray.
Hardy zones 2 to 6 in full sun to partial shade. It grows well even in extreme climates such as Alberta, Canada and interior Alaska.

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario







* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken by http://www.nwplants.com





* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook




* photo of unknown internet source


'Alfredo'
More compact, reaching only 4.5 x 5 feet in 7 years, eventually reaching about 12 feet.
The foliage turns to intense red and purple during autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 6. Extremely hardy, it thrives even in much of Alberta.

'Bailey Compact'
Attractive red fall color and smaller in size to 6 x 8 feet.

'Redwing'
Foliage is purplish-red during spring, turning to deep green then to deep red in fall.
The flowers are followed by long lasting red fruit.



'Spring Red'
Red new foliage in spring.

'Wentworth'
Fast growing cultivar reaching up to 15 feet in height and width and grows especially well on wet flood prone soils. In fall and winter it produces a heavy crop of long-lasting bright scarlet berries
The foliage is reddish at first, it also has excellent red call color.

Viburnum utile ( Service Viburnum )
An evergreen open shrub, reaching up to 11 x 11 feet, that is native to China. Some records include: 5 years - 4.5 x 7 feet.
The leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The fragrant, creamy-white flowers are borne on dense rounded clusters up to 3 inches across.
They are followed by oval berries. The flowers attract butterflies.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on moist, well drained soil.
Drought tolerant and deer resistant.

* photo taken on March 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum

* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum

* photo taken on 4th of July 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum

* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC



'Chesapeake'
A large semi-evergreen Viburnum growing up to 2 feet per year, eventually reaching up to 12 x 13 feet though easily pruned.
The oval leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are very glossy luxuriant deep green.
The fragrant flowers are pink in bud, opening to white. They are borne on clusters up to 3.5 inches across.
It is hardier north to zone 5. It is killed to ground at -25 F


* photo from unknown source on internet

* photo taken on Nov 2 2013 in Clarksville, MD

* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD



Viburnum veitchii ( Chinese Wayfaring Tree )
Also called Viburnum glomeratum or Flat Topped Viburnum. A rare native to central China that resembles Viburnum lantana. It is an upright deciduous shrub ( rarely small tree ) reaching up to 10 feet tall and 6 feet in width. Some records include: largest on record - 20 x 12 feet.
The sharply-toothed, broadly-ovate or obovate leaves, up to 7.5 x 4 ( rarely over 5 x 3 ) inches in size, are velvety, glossy deep green.
The white flowers are borne on flat clusters up to 5 inches during late spring.
They are followed by red berries that ripen to black. Multiple plants of differing genetic source are required to grow in close proximity for berry production to occur.
Hardy zone 5 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on deep, fertile soil.

Viburnum wrightii ( Wright Viburnum )
A moderate growing, dense, upright to rounded, large deciduous shrub similar to the Viburnum dilatatum; it can reach up to 15 x 17 feet though usually much less. It is native to Honshu Island in Japan.
The deeply-veined, coarsely-toothed, broad-oval leaves, up to 6 x 3 inches in size, are bright green at first, later turning to glossy deep green. The foliage turns intensely red during autumn.
The white flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne on abundant, showy, flat clusters, up to 4 inches across, during late spring. The flowers appear earlier than that of V. dilatatum.
They are followed by rounded, glossy, scarlet-red berries, up to 0.3 inches wide each. The very showy fruits ripen during early autumn, persisting through late winter, providing an excellent food source for wildlife.
Hardy zone 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist, rich, well drained soil. It is rarely bothered by insect pests or disease.

* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


* photos taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD













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