Saturday, May 1, 2010

The Hackberries & Friends

Aphananthe

Aphananthe aspera ( Muku Tree )
A fast growing, large tree related to the Hackberries that is native to southwest & eastern China, Korea and Japan. An excellent shade tree that is both deep rooted and sturdy. It is similar in form to the Zelkova's and Elm.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - 133 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 ( very rare over 6 ) feet; largest in Georgia - 60 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.8 feet. Very long-lived, it can survive for up to 1500 ( rarely over 600 ) years.
The smooth, ovate leaves are up to 6 x 2.5 inches in size. The foliage is very glossy, very deep green; turning to yellow during autumn. The foliage remains healthy and attractive throughout the growing season.
The tiny flowers appear during late spring.
They are followed by edible, small, black fruits, up to 0.5 inches wide.
The bark is smooth and beige.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 and tolerant of flooding.
It likely prefers hot humid summers. Easy to grow, it is virtually immune to insect pests and disease.

* link to external website showing one of largest on record

http://www.monumentaltrees.com/nl/fotos/7833/

* photos taken on 4th of July 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.




* photos taken on Feb 8 2014 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* excellent video found on youtube


Celtis - HACKBERRY

Very dense, round canopied trees. Very tough, urban as well as soil tolerant in addition to being deep rooted; the Hackberries make for excellent street trees. The roots on large trees rarely cause problems such as lifting sidewalks.
Pruning is rarely needed except for shaping young trees and encouraging a central leader. Propagation is from seed which should be cold stratified for 3 months before sowing. Stem cuttings are another propagation method where seed is not available.

* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


Celtis africana ( White Stinkwood )
A large, dense, fast growing deciduous to semi evergreen tree to 80 feet or more, that is native to Africa ( much of eastern and southern Africa as well as parts of the Arabian Peninsula ). Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; largest on record - 150 x 50 feet.
The foliage is similar to Celtis australis. The leaves turn to yellow during autumn.
The bark is smooth and very pale gray to white.
Hardy zones 8 to 12 ( reports of 6 and 7 ). Is drought resistant and makes for an excellent shade tree.

* photo of unknown internet source

* excellent video found on youtube


Celtis australis ( European Hackberry )
A long-lived, dense, dome-canopied, large, deciduous tree reaching up to 100 feet that is native to a wide range from southern Europe, southwest Asia and northwestern Africa, especially around the Mediterranean. Some record include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 10 years - 30 x 27 feet; 14 years - 40 feet; 80 years - trunk diameter of 5 feet; largest on record - 131 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.7 feet; largest in U.S. - 100 x 70 x 4 feet @ Sacramento State Capital, California. The European Hackberry ( also called the European Nettle Tree ) can reach an extreme age of 1000 years. It makes a great street tree and is often used as such in Italy and France.
The sharply-toothed, pointed lance-shaped to oval leaves are up to 6 x 3 inches in size. The foliage is deep green and rough above; downy gray-green beneath. In mild climates the foliage can be semi-evergreen.
The flowers appear singly in the leaf axils and are small, green and without petals.
The berry like fruits up to 0.5 inches across are brown, later ripening to black.
The bark is smooth and gray.
Prefers hot summers. Thinning may be necessary on younger trees.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 and drought tolerant.

* photo from unknown internet source


* historic archive photos

* excellent video found on youtube


Celtis biondii ( Biondi's Hackberry )
A medium-sized tree native to central China that can reach up to 50 feet. Some records include: largest on record - 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet. It is known to grow at the Niagara Parks Botanical Gardens in Niagara Falls, Ontario.
The toothed, broadly-ovate leaves are up to 4 x 1.6 inches in size. The attractive foliage is glossy deep green.
The yellow to reddish-orange, rounded fruits, up to 0.3 inches wide, ripen during early autumn.
The gray bark resembles that of Celtis occidentalis.
Hardy zones 5 to 7.

* excellent photo link
http://www.asianflora.com/Ulmaceae/Celtis-biondii.htm

Celtis bungeana ( Bunch Hackberry )
An extremely rare, bushy, rounded, medium-size tree that is a widespread native to northern China and Korea. Some records include: largest on record - 80 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The toothed, ovate leaves, up to 6 x 2 ( rarely over 4 ) inches in size, are very glossy deep green. There is no significant fall color.
The blackish-blue berries, up to 0.3 inches wide, ripen during mid-autumn.
The smooth bark is light gray.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 ( likely to 3 for seed source from Liaoning & Inner Mongolia ), it is very drought tolerant and disease resistant.

* excellent photo link
http://kashalot.kakpryg.net/Public/Celtis%20Bungeana/Celtis-bungeana_2.jpg

Celtis caucasica ( Caucasian Hackberry )
A fast growing native of southwest Asia ( from the Caucasus to Kazakhstan; Kyrgyzstan; Tajikistan; Turkmenistan & Uzbekistan; south to Afghanistan to northern India ); this Hackberry is similar to Celtis australis but with smaller leaves. Some records include: 20 years - 40 feet; largest on record - 100 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 5.3 feet.
The sharply-toothed, ovate leaves, up to 4 x 2 inches in size, are very deep green.
The rounded, yellow fruits, up to 0.3 inches wide, ripen during early autumn.
The bark is dark gray.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 and enjoys cooler summers, thriving in southern England. Can survive on as little as 20 inches of annual precip.

* excellent photo link
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/55984.html

Celtis choseniana ( Chosen Hackberry )
Also called Korean Black Hackberry. An attractive medium-sized tree, reaching a maximum height of 80 ( rarely over 50 ) native to Korea. It forms a spreading canopy of horizontal layered branches.
The hanging, narrow, ovate leaves are shiny deep green in summer and generally do not color well in autumn with the foliage either falling green or brown.
The leaves do fall clear from the slender, zig-zag stems in autumn.
The hanging black fruits are up to 0.5 inches across.
This is one of the very few Hackberries that succeeds well in the Pacific Northwest and the British Isles. Most other Hackberries prefer hot summers. It is also drought tolerant as well as tolerating the extremely wet winters and cool summers found on the Pacific Region.
Hardy north to zone 7, possibly hardier in more continental climates.

Celtis glabrata
A rounded, small, deciduous tree to 25 feet that is native to Turkey and the Caucasus region of Asia.
Some records include: largest on record - 41 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet in 100 years in England.
The ovate leaves are rough above and are deeply serrate margined with incurved teeth. They are up to 3 x 2 inches in size and are deep green above.
The berries are red-brown and very small.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( some seed source may be hardy to zone 4b as it is reported to grow at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Ontario )

Celtis jessoensis ( Jesso hackberry )
A very rare, medium-size, deciduous tree, reaching a maximum size of 82 x 70 feet, that is native to Korea and Japan. Moderate growing, it can reach up to 20 feet in 10 years. Rare in the U.S.; it has great landscape potential and large trees already exist at Arnold Arboretum in Boston, Massachusetts.
The attractive, sharply-toothed, ovate leaves, up to 4 x 1.6 inches in size, are glossy bright green above, bluish-white beneath.
The black berries ripen during early autumn.
The beech-like bark is smooth and light gray.
Hardy zones 5 to 8. It is resistant to witches broom.

* photos taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON


Celtis julianae ( Julian Hackberry )
A beautiful, fast growing, large tree, reaching a maximum height of 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet, that is native to central and southern China. Some records include: 2 years - 5.5 feet; oldest on record - 700 years.
The minutely-toothed, ovate or elliptical leaves, up to 6 x 3 inches in size, are glossy deep green.
The orange berries, up to 0.5 inches wide, ripen during early autumn.
The smooth bark is light gray.
Hardy zones 5 to 8.

Celtis koraiensis ( Korean Hackberry )
Also called Celtis aurantiaca. A moderate growing, rounded, small deciduous tree, reaching up to 50 x 30 ( rarely over 30 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot, that is native to northern China, Manchuria and Korea. Some records include: 5 years- 10 feet; 10 years - 13 feet; 20 years - 20 feet.
The very deeply-toothed, elliptic or rounded leaves are up to 6 x 5 inches in size.
The papery foliage is glossy mid-green.
The orange fruits, up to 0.5 inches wide, ripen during early autumn.
The bark is gray.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 and pest free. It thrives in midwestern North America and can be found at the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum.

Celtis laevigata ( Sugar Hackberry )
A very fast growing large tree reaching 80 feet or more with a high rounded crown that is native to river valley forests in the south and central U.S from central Kansas to Maryland; south to Laredo TX to central Florida. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 feet; 3 years - 14 x 12 feet; 10 years - 35 x 35 feet; largest on record is 150 x 110 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet. The Sugar Hackberry can live up to 150 years of age. From a distance; the Sugar Hackberry looks very similar to the Northern Hackberry.
The ovate leaves are up to 6 x 3 inches in size. The margins are usually smooth but sometimes have tiny teeth in the upper half. The thin, smooth foliage is bright to mid green above, pale yellow green beneath. The foliage turns to pale yellow or sometimes not at all during autumn.
The flowers appear singly in the leaf axils and are small, green and without petals.
The berries up to 0.5 inches in width are orange turning to purple-black in autumn. They attract birds. The fruit often persists through the winter.
The slender twigs zig-zag and have tiny buds.
The bark is smooth, gray and Beech-like; later turning light gray with warty knobs.
The wood weighs 36 pounds per square foot.
Hardy zones 4 to 10 and is both salt and very drought tolerant. It prefers hot summers and thrives in most of Midwestern and Eastern United States and southern Ontario, Canada. It is also flood tolerant but can be prone to chlorosis on high PH soil. The Sugar Hackberry makes an excellent street and park tree.

* photos taken on Oct 31 2013 @ Hampton Ntl. Historic Site, Towson, MD

* photo taken by Robert Ridgeway @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC

* photo of unknown internet source

* historical archive photos

* photos taken on Apr 11 2015 @ Belmont Mansion, Elkridge, MD


'Prairie Pride'
large, deep green, shiny, leathery foliage.

Celtis linderheimeri ( Lindheimer Hackberry )
A small tree to 30 feet or rarely more, that is native to the Edward Plateau of Texas. Some records include: largest on record - 50 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet. It is endangered in the wild with remaining populations highly scattered.
The leaves are broad oval to obovate and up to 3 or rarely 4 inches in length with either smooth or toothed margins. The leathery leaves are rough and deep green above, pale green or whitish and hairy beneath.
The flowers are different from other Hackberries in being borne in erect, dense clusters of 2 to 9 in the leaf axils.
The fruits up to 0.25 inches across are reddish-brown.
The twigs resemble that of other Hackberries in being slender, zig-zagging and with small buds. The smooth pale gray bark develops warty ridges with age.
This rare tree is hardy zones 5 to 9 and is extremely heat tolerant. If I lived in the southern Plains States I would certainly experiment with this tree to determine further use in urban forestry or street plantings.

* map of range on unknown internet source

* excellent photo link
http://www.arkive.org/lindheimer-hackberry/celtis-lindheimeri/

Celtis 'Magnifica'
The hybrid between Celtis laevigata and Celtis occidentalis; it is faster growing than both and is disease resistant. Some records include: 20 years - 60 x 50 feet.
It makes an excellent shade and street tree.
The foliage is large and glossy.
It is very cold, drought and salt tolerant.

Celtis occidentalis ( Northern Hackberry )
A large, dense, round canopied tree reaching up to 75 feet or more that is native to rich woodlands of central and eastern North America ( from eastern Wyoming to southeast Manitoba to Kenora, Ontario to Saginaw, Michigan to Goderich, Ontario to Owen Sound, Ontario to Ottawa, Ontario to southeast Quebec to Massachusetts; south to southwest Oklahoma to central Mississippi to central North Carolina. It is also locally native to the Ottawa Valley in Ontario. It is endangered in Wyoming, Manitoba, Quebec and North Caroina. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario regions; it was abundant along the Detroit River and the entire Lake Erie shoreline east to Point Pelee as well as the Lake Erie islands and the Ohio shore during the 1800s. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; 5 years - 13 x 9 feet ( Alberta ); 10 years - 30 x 27 feet; 20 years - trunk diameter of 10 inches; largest on record - 160 x 112 feet with a trunk diameter of 9.2 feet; tallest in Michigan - 120 feet @ Wayland.
I have personally noted many very large Hackberries in the Leamington, Ontario area where it is common on sandy soils, especially at Point Pelee, Pelee Island and around Cedar Beach. Further north a tree of 5 foot diameter was recorded in Norfolk County in 1908.
The Northern Hackberry can live up to 250 years.
The Northern hackberry roots deeply, with roots as deep as 20 feet being recorded.
An excellent shade tree for a large open site, it should not be planted too close to your home since its greedy aggressive roots can easily break into water pipes. An important food source to the larvae of many different butterflies, this stately tree should be planted at least once in every neighborhood within its native range.
The sharply-toothed leaves are up to 7 x 4.5 ( rarely over 5.5 x 2.5 ) inches in size; they can either be rough or smooth above and are hairy beneath.
They appear late in the spring, are glossy deep green above, light green beneath turning to clear yellow in autumn.
The flowers appear singly in the leaf axils and are small, green and without petals.
The edible fruits, up to 0.4 inches wide are red ripening to dark purple in autumn.
The fruits are borne single on slender stems up 0.5 inches long.
The bark on young trees is smooth and gray, later becoming light gray and corky.
Very old trees have furrowed and scaly bark. The light wood is sometimes used for cabinet-making. The Hackberry makes great firewood and gives off around 20 million Btu per cord.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 and prefers fertile, acidic, well drained soils in full sun.
This tree prefers hot humid summers and does not grow well in England or the Pacific Northwest. It is often prone to diseases when planted south of its native range.
However the Northern Hackberry is tolerant of limestone as well as being extremely urban, pollution and drought tolerant making for an excellent urban shade and street tree. Some reports consider this tree salt tolerant while others do not. It also tolerates flooding but not continuous swampy conditions.
For zones 2 to 5 only use seed source from more northerly parts of native range.
Propagation is from seed which can be sown immediately upon ripening during autumn or stratified at 40 F for 3 months. Small seedlings transplant well, and crowded seedlings under existing trees can be moved.

* photos taken on 4th of July 2010 in Washington, D.C.




* part of the wreckage from the Leamington, Ontario tornado on June 6 2010

* photos taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario



* photo taken on August 4 2010 in Stratford, Ontario


* photos of unknown internet source


* photos taken on July 1999 west of Leamington, Ontario

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook

* photos taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC

* photo taken by W.R. Mattoon @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on Nov 28 2015 in Dauphin, PA

* photo taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA

* photos taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Major's Hill Park, Ottawa, ON

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON

* historical archive photos


'Chicagoland'
Vigorous and upright with a strong central leader. Large foliage.

'Delta'
Derived of northerly seed source and is hardy north to zone 3a.
Excellent shade and street tree for the Great Plains.

'Eagle Lake'
Exceptionally hardy, thriving even in much of Alberta, Canada, reaching up to 11 x 10 feet in 5 years.

'Oahe'
Extremely hardy and is the best choice for use in the Dakotas, thriving on 14 to 26 inches of yearly rainfall. It is slower growing ( 1.5 feet per year ) and of smaller stature however forms a dense, luxuriant canopied tree where very few other trees will thrive. Some records include: 7 years - 12 feet; 9 years - 17 feet; 13 years - 26 feet.

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.


'Prairie Pride'
Well formed tree with a single straight trunk and a dense rounded canopy. The attractive foliage is very glossy and it is resistant to gall and witches broom.

'Prairie Sentinel'
A tight, columnar form, great for confined urban spaces.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

'Windy City'
Reaching up to 40 x 45 feet in 20 years, eventually more; this cultivar is fast growing and of good shape as well as improved foliage.

Celtis pallida ( Desert hackberry )
Also called Celtis ehrenbergiana. A fast growing, small tree with pendulous branches that is native from the southwestern U.S. ( central Arizona to southern New Mexico to south-central Texas ) south to northern Argentina. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 31 x 23 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 inches. It is the only Hackberry with thorns.
The foliage is either evergreen to 20 F or late deciduous in colder climates. The smooth-edged, elliptical leaves are up to 3 ( usually half that ) inches in length. The rough foliage is mid-green.
The tiny, greenish-white flowers are borne on narrow clusters during spring.
The fleshy, yellowish to red berries, up to 0.3 inches wide, are edible. They ripen during early to mid-autumn.
The bark is light gray in color.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 tolerating as low as -3 F ( reports of zone 6a exist ). This tree is not known to grow in the humid eastern U.S. or Canada. It prefers full sun to partial shade on deep sandy well drained soil and is very heat tolerant. The seeds germinate quickly and easily if sown fresh.

Celtis reticulata ( Netleaf Hackberry )
An attractive, fast growing, broad, round canopied tree to 50 feet that is native to desert mountains of the western North America ( from north-central Washington State to central Idaho to north-central Kansas; south to the mountains of Mexico ). Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; largest on record - 74 x 85 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet. The Netleaf Hackberry can live up to 200 years of age.
The ovate foliage is similar to that of Celtis laevigata but is thick and up to 5 x 3 inches in size. The leaf margins are generally smooth but can sometimes be toothed.
The foliage is rough and yellow green above, hairy gray-green beneath. The leaves turn to golden-yellow during autumn.
The rounded, orange-red fruits are up to 0.3 inches wide.
The bark is light gray and warty.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 ( likely 3 for Idaho seed source ) in sun or partial shade. An extremely tough tree for use as an urban shade and street tree in the drier western U.S. It is very tolerant of heat and drought and is rarely bothered by pests or disease. Netleaf Hackberry thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada through generally is practically unknown in eastern North America.

* Photos taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photo taken by Sheri Hagwood @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photos



Celtis sinensis ( Chinese Hackberry )
A broad, irregular, rounded, large tree reaching up to 60 feet or more, that is native over much of eastern Asia including centra & eastern China, Korea and Japan. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; 15 years - 27 + feet; largest on record - 100 x 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 feet; largest in California - 75 x 70 x 3.2 feet in Davis; largest in PA - 73 x 80 x 4 feet @ Welkinweir, Pottstown, PA. In Englands cooler summers; it is slower growing but can still reach 37 feet in 25 years.
It has been grown as a street tree on the east coast of Australia. Very long lived; the Chinese Hackberry can last as long as 1000 years.
The foliage can be either deciduous or semi-evergreen depending on climate.
They are thick, leathery, toothed, blunt-tipped leaves are up to 7 x 2 inches in size. The leaves are very glossy, very deep green above and olive green below.
The edible fruits, up to 0.3 inches wide in summer are yellow, later ripening to orange then black.
The bark is smooth and dark gray.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 though it is possible that some northerly seed source may survive as far as zone 4 in a protected location. It is tolerant of floodplain conditions.

* photos taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.






* photos taken on Sep 3 2017 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* excellent video found on youtube


'Green Cascade'
Very vigorous, twisted, weeping form.
Hardy north to zone 6

Celtis tenuifolia ( Georgia Hackberry )
A small tree to 18 feet or rarely more, that is native to eastern North America ( from southwest Kansas to central Michigan to Grand Bend, Ontario to Belleville, Ontario to northern New Jersey, south to central Texas to northern Florida ). It also grows locally on gravelly dry soil, sand dunes and limestone in Ontario, Canada where it is endangered in the wild. Port Franks near Grand Bend, Point Pelee and Pelee Island near Leamington, and 3 locations near Belleville are the only known remaining stands. It likely also originally occurred on the sand dunes around Long Point along the middle northern shore of Lake Erie as well as at other locations around Grand Bend. It is also endangered in Michigan and New Jersey. Some records include: 3 years - 13 feet; largest on record - 50 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.3 feet. It has reached up to 35 feet at the Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Ontario. Also called the "Dwarf Hackberry"; this tree can live up to 150 years of age.
The thick, leathery, toothed leaves are up to 4 x 2 inches in size though usually half that. The foliage is rough and dark grayish-green above, hairy and gray-green beneath.
The fruit, up to 0.25 inches wide is orange dark red when ripe.
The bark on young trees is smooth and gray, later becoming light gray and with corky ridges.
Hardy zones 4 to 9, thriving much to the north of its natural range to Ottawa, Ontario. Cultivated non-native populations in the Toronto region have been known to naturally reproduce. Very heat and drought tolerant but requires well drained soil and sun.

* photos taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario


* photos taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore, PA


* photos taken on July 30 2013 in Grand Bend, Ontario

* photo of unknown internet source


Celtis tetrandra
A deciduous or evergreen ( depending on climate ) tall tree native to southeast Asia ( from Nepal to southwest China; south to Bangladesh to Burma to Vietnam ). It can reach a maximum height of 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The papery, smooth-edged, ovate leaves, up to 5 x 2.3 inches in size, are glossy deep green.
The yellowish-orange, rounded fruit, up to 0.3 inches wide, ripen during early autumn.
The bark is grayish-white.
Unlike most other Hackberries; it is not hardy in frost prone climates.

Celtis tournefortii ( Oriental Hackberry )
A small tree native from Bulgaria & Yugoslavia to Ukraine to the Caucasus; south to Sicily to Turkey to northwest Iran. Some records include: 20 years - 10 feet; largest on record - 30 x 32 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot. A tree of 20 feet grows at Longwood Gardens near Philly, PA.
The toothed, ovate leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is polished, glossy, gray-green to deep green above; pale green beneath; turning to bright yellow during autumn.
The fruits, up to 0.4 inches wide, are orangish-yellow.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 ( some seed source not hardy north of 7 but it is also considered vigorous and fully hardy in Ottawa, Ontario ) on sandy well drained soils. It is very drought tolerant and makes an excellent small street or patio tree.

Pteroceltis ( Yipli ) - 1 species

Pteroceltis tatarinowii ( Yipli )
The only species of Pteroceltis; the Yipli is a medium size tree to 50 feet or more that is native to northern and central China where endangered. Some records include: 1st year - 40 inches; fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 70 x 56 x 4.7 feet. This tree grows very well in the eastern U.S. and the largest on record is at Morris Arboretum in Philly. It grows with a gracefully arching broad spreading canopy. The Yipli is a very long lived tree.
The leaves are oval and finely serrate edged. They are bright green and up to 5 x 2.5 inches.
The flowers in spring are inconspicuous, green and borne from the leaf axils.
The fruit is round, green and winged, up to an inch across.
The bark is peeling and exfoliates white and dark gray.
The timber is hard and durable. It is similar to Oak and Teak.
Hardy zones 4 to 9. Prefers moist, fertile, well drained soil in full sun in a spot protected from excessive wind. Can be propagated from seed or cutting.

* photos taken on 4th of July 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.



* photos taken on Feb 8 2014 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

No comments:

Post a Comment