Saturday, May 1, 2010

False Spirea

Sorbaria

A genus of 5 species of pinnate leaved shrubs native to Asia that are distant relatives of the Rose. They are very attractive in flower but are also grown for their attractive ferny foliage that is stunning planted next to a sheltered lake or pond.
The small white flowers borne in large panicles at the stem tips are followed by masses of small brown seed capsules that persist into winter. The flowers attract butterflies.
They prefer full sun to partial shade on moist, fertile soil. They perform best on sites sheltered from excessive wind which may damage the foliage. Very easy to grow; they tolerate drought, flooding, sand, clay, acidic or alkaline soil. Sorbaria are rarely eaten by deer. Pruning includes removing old weak branches at the ground level and remaining branches can be cut back if necessary in early spring for renovation or size control.
Propagation can be from softwood cuttings taken in summer ( rooted in a month ) and from removed suckers. Root cuttings and division in winter are also options. Seed sown upon ripening germinate easily without any pretreatment.

* photo taken on Jul 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON


Sorbaria aitchisonii ( Kashmir False Spirea )
A large spreading shrub reaching a maximum size of 20 x 20 feet, that is very similar to Sorbaria tomentosa but is native to Afghanistan and Kashmir. Some records include: 5 years - 9 x 6 feet; 10 years - 10 x 10 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to 15 inches in length are composed of 11 to 23 very fine leaflets up to 4 inches in length.
The foliage is reddish at first, turning to luxuriant mid-green. The leaves turn to brilliant red during autumn.
The creamy-white flowers are borne in large terminal panicles up to 18 x 11 ( rarely 24 x 16 ) inches in size in summer.
The young shoots are reddish and the branches are purplish-brown.
Hardy zone 4 to 7, it is surprisingly fully hardy and thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada which has a climate far different from its natural range.

* historical archive photo


Sorbaria arborea ( Kirilow False Spirea )
A very graceful, fast growing small tree native to the Himalayas ( Tibet to western China ) that reaches a maximum size of 33 x 25 feet.
The pinnate leaves, up to 18 inches in length are composed of up to 17 serrated lance shape leaflets up to 5 x 1.8 inches in size.
The foliage is bright green.
The white flowers are borne in large terminal panicles up to 18 x 12 inches in size in summer.
The bark is reddish.
Hardy zone 4 to 7, it thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada and would likely do well in much of the midwest and northeastern U.S. and Ontario, Canada.

Sorbaria 'Aurora'
A hybrid reaching up to 8.5 x 11 feet in 6 years, eventually to 10 x 12 feet that combines the upright form of Sorbaria arborea with the hardiness of Sorbaria sorbifolia. It is upright and suckering in habit with dense, deep green foliage.
Hardy north to zone 3. highly recommended in Alberta's harsh climate. It prefers moist well drained soil and may become stunted on dry soils.

Sorbaria grandiflora
A small shrub native to eastern Siberia that reaches up to 3 feet in height.
The pinnate leaves are composed of up to 21 leaflets up to 3 x 1 inches.
The white flowers are borne in flattened clusters up to 5 x 5 inches in summer.
The shoots are red-gray and downy. The bark is exfoliating.
Hardy zone 2 to 6

Sorbaria sorbifolia ( Ural False Spirea )
A very fast growing suckering shrub with stiff erect stems that is native to northern Asia ( from the Ural Mountains of Siberia to northeast Mongolia & Sakhalin; south to northeast China, Korea and northern Japan ). Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 45 inches; 6 years - 9 x 11 feet; 10 years - 10 x 16 feet; largest on record - 10 x 20 + feet. It is a great plant for use on large commercial landscapes.
The pinnate leaves, up to 12 inches in length are composed of 13 to 25 finely-toothed, lance-shaped leaflets up to 5 x 1 inches in size. The foliage appears very early in spring and is reddish at first, turning to luxuriant mid-green then to red late in autumn. Even in central Illinois, it leafs out as early as late March. The foliage looks good all season.
The creamy-white flowers, up to 0.2 inches wide, are borne in erect, dense, pyramidal terminal plumes, up to 12 x 6 inches in size, during mid-summer.
Hardy zone 1 to 7 in sun or shade on deep, moist, fertile soil. Extremely cold hardy and thrives in the northern Great Plains to as far north as Fairbanks, Alaska. Tolerant of dry shade.

* photo taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photos taken on July 17 2010 @ Morris Arboretum, Philly, PA


* photo taken on August 2 2010 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on July 26 2015 @ Niagara Parks Bot. Gardens, Niagara Falls, ON

* photos taken by Dr. Nick V. Kurzenko @ CalPhotos


Mai Tai'
Reaches up to 6 x 6 + feet, with foliage that is bright orange at first, later turning to deep green.

'Sem'
Fast growing but compact in habit, reaching up to 6 x 10 feet in 6 years, eventually more.
The foliage is pinkish at first, turning to lime-green. The leaves turn intense orange-red during autumn.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photo taken on Mar 15 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 12 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 2 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Mar 18 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on May 4 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 18 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


Sorbaria tomentosa ( Lindley False Spirea )
A large wide spreading shrub native to the Himalayas that reaches a maximum size of 20 x 20 feet. Some records include: 10 years - 8 x 10 feet ( average )
The pinnate leaves, up to 18 inches in length are composed of 11 to 23 serrated lance shape leaflets up to 5 x 2 inches in size.
The foliage is bright bronze-red at first, turning to medium green in summer then to brilliant red in autumn.
The creamy-white flowers are borne in huge terminal panicles up to 18 x 11 inches in size in summer.
The branches are purplish-brown.
Hardy zone 4 to 7. More drought tolerant than Sorbaria sorbifolia and grows well in much of the U.S. however not in the hot humid southeast. Very soil tolerant, it may even be grown on sand dunes.

No comments:

Post a Comment