Tuesday, May 18, 2010

New Guinea Impatiens

Few summer annuals exceed the New Guinea's in brightening up a shady spot. They will also tolerate some sun in areas where summers are not too hot and if kept moist.
New Guinea Impatiens reach up to 2 feet in height.
They bear flowers of just about any color except yellow or blue. The flowers, up to 3 inches in wide, are borne all summer long and until autumn frost.

* photos taken on April 28 2010 in Howard County, MD















* photo taken on July 16 2010 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on August 2 2010 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Aug 4 2012 in Bayfield, ON


* photos taken on Oct 6 2012 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on June 10 2013 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on Oct 17 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC

* photo taken on June 23 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 17 2016 in Columbia, MD


Regular Impatien's ( Impatiens wallerana )
A perennial ( annual where frost occur ), reaching up to 2 x 2 ( rarely over 1.5 ) feet in size, that is native to the tropical forests in eastern Africa.
The ovate or elliptical leaves, up to 3 inches in length, range from bright green to deep green.
The flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne all summer long. They can be of many colors.
Hardy zones 10 to 12 in partial to full shade on humus-rich, well drained soil. They can also be grown as an annual in temperate climates if planted out during late spring after the last frost. Where Impatiens wallerana is prone to disease...New Guineas should be planted instead.

* photos taken on June 19 2010 in Columbia, MD



* photo taken on Aug 2010 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 1 2011 in Luzerne Co., PA

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken on Aug 2 2012 in Bayfield, ON


Related Species

Impatiens capensis ( Jewelweed )
Also called Impatiens biflora. A annual, reaching up to 5 x 2 feet in size, that is native to moist woodlands and floodplains in much of North America ( from the Yukon to southwest Northwest Territories to Fort McMurray, Alberta to Thompson, Manitoba to Moosonee, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to northwest Washington State to North Dakota to eastern Texas to far northern Florida ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant in the Canard River Valley, around Point Pelee, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit, Michigan during that time.
The alternately-arranged, toothed, elliptical leaves, up to 4.7 x 2.8 inches in size, are bright green.
The orange flowers are irresistible to hummingbirds. They are borne early summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist to wet, humus-rich soil. It self seeds readily in ideal conditions.

* photos taken on Sep 3 2012 in Harford Co, MD

* photo taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, Wash., DC
* photos taken on Aug 16 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 13 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 12 2016 in Howard Co., MD


Impatiens glandulifera ( Himalayan Balsam )
A tall growing annual, reaching up to 10 feet, that is native to the Himalayas.
It may be invasive in the British Isles and parts of the Pacific Northwest. It is locally naturalized in Ontario, Canada near Lake Huron in Bruce and Huron Counties...especially around Sauble Beach, Wiarton, Owen Sound and Bayfield.
The elliptical or oblong leaves are up to 6 x 3 inches in size.
The flowers, up to 2 inches wide, can be white, pink or purple. They are borne mid to late summer.
It thrives in partial shade on moist to wet sites. The seeds are very cold tolerant and self reproducing populations have been found as far north as Juneau, Alaska, Edmonton, Alberta, Winnipeg, Manitoba and the Gaspe region of Quebec.

* photos taken on Aug 4 2012 in Bayfield, Ontario


Impatien omeiana ( Mount Omei Balsam )
A low spreading perennial, reaching a maximum height of 20 inches, that is native to forest understory at Mt Omei in Sichuan Province in western China. It can spread to form a clump up to 3.3 feet across in 2 or 3 years.
The foliage appears very early during spring. The toothed, lance-shaped to narrowly-oblong leaves are up to 6.5 x 2 inches in size. The foliage is deep green with a silver interior pattern.
The spiraling foliage is clustered towards the stem tips.
The deep yellow flowers are borne late summer until autumn frosts.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in partial to full shade on consistantly moist, well drained soil though established plants may tolerate temporary drought in shade. Propagation is from division during early spring before the foliage emerges.

* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


Impatiens pallida ( Yellow Jewelweed )
A annual, reaching up to 6.5 x 2 feet in size, that is native to wet meadows & moist woodlands in eastern North America ( from Saskatchewan to Manitoba to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to Lions Head, Ontario to southeast Quebec to Newfoundland; south to eastern Oklahoma to far northern Georgia to North Carolina ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant around Windsor as well as the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s.
The alternately-arranged, toothed, elliptical leaves, up to 5.5 x 3 inches in size, are bright green.
The yellow flowers are irresistible to hummingbirds. They are borne early summer to mid-autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist to wet, humus-rich soil. It self seeds readily in ideal conditions.

* photos taken on July 16 2016 in Bayfield, ON

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