Saturday, May 1, 2010

Bluebells / Squill

Scilla caucasica
A very long-lived, bulbous perennial, reaching up to 6 inches in height, that is native to the Caucasian Mountains.
The mid-bright blue flowers are borne over a 3 week period during early spring. The flowers are larger with more per cluster than the closely related S. sibirica. It seeds readily but is not invasive...it looks great as a mass planting under deciduous trees. It can be planted in lawns ( esp Buffalo Grass ) that are not sprayed with pesticides as it usually goes dormant by the time the lawn really needs a mowing. It can also be planted with deciduous groundcover that comes up late such as Plumbago.
The mid-green foliage goes dormant during early summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 ( 3 on protected sites ) in sun or partial shade ( it does most of its growth cycle before trees leaf out enabling this sun loving plant to thrive in dense hardwood forests ) on moist, well drained loam however it can tolerate drought while dormant during summer. Easy to grow. It self seeds and is great for naturalizing and forming a flower carpet in the deciduous hardwood forest understory. The bulbs should be planted 3 to 4 inches in depth.

Scilla hispanica ( Spanish Bluebells )
Also called Hyacinthoides hispanica. Reaches up to 20 ( rarely over 15 ) inches in height. Great for planting with Vinca groundcover.
The showy, large, blue, pink or white flowers are borne during late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade, preferring humus-rich soil in the deciduous woodland understory. Thrives in dry shade. Deer resistant.
Plant during late August through September 4 to 6 inches apart and 4 inches deep.

* photos taken on April 18 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum



* photos taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.





* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on April 9 2012 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on April 27 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on April 27 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photo taken on Apr 29 2016 in Columbia, MD

* historic archive photo

* excellent video found on Youtube


'Alba'
White flowers, otherwise identical.

* photo of unknown internet source
* photos taken on April 18 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 20 2013 in Columbia, MD
* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photos taken on Apr 20 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Rosea'
Pink flowers, otherwise identical.

* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photos taken on Apr 20 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 28 2017 in Ellicott City, MD


Scilla non-scripta ( English Bluebells )
Also called Hyacinthoides non-scripta. Reaches up to 1.5 feet.
The fragrant, blue flowers are borne during late spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 in partial shade on moist, humis-rich, well drained soil in the deciduous woodland understory. Rabbit and deer resistant.

* Excellent videos found on Youtube


Scilla mischtschenkoana ( Mishchenko Squill )
Also called Scilla tubergeniana. A bulbous perennia, reaching up to 1 foot in height, that is native to the southern Caucasian Mountains and northern Iran.
The linear leaves, up to 4.8 x 0.3 inches in size, are glossy mid-green.
The white to bright blue flowers, up to 1.3 inches wide, are borne during mid spring for a period lasting up to 3 weeks.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil.

Scilla rosenii ( Rosen's Scilla )
A bulbous perennial, reaching up to 8 inches in height, that is native to northeast Turkey and the western Caucasus Mountains.
The linear leaves are up to 6 x 0.3 inches in size.
The white to bright blue flowers, up to 1.4 inches wide, are large for a Scilla. They are planted during early spring.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil that is moist during spring. The bulbs should be planted 3 inches deep.

Scilla sibirica ( Siberian Squill )
The blue flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are borne over a 3 week period during early spring. It seeds readily but is not invasive...it looks great as a mass planting under deciduous trees. It can be planted in lawns ( esp Buffalo Grass ) that are not sprayed with pesticides as it usually goes dormant by the time the lawn really needs a mowing. It can also be planted with deciduous groundcover that comes up late such as Plumbago.
The mid-green foliage goes dormant during early summer. The linear leaves are up to 6 x 0.8 inches in size. Hardy zones 2 to 8 in sun or partial shade ( it does most of its growth cycle before trees leaf out enabling this sun loving plant to thrive in dense hardwood forests ) on moist, fertile loam however it can tolerate drought while dormant during summer. Easy to grow, the bulbs should be planted 4 inches deep and apart. It self seeds and is great for naturalizing and forming a flower carpet in the deciduous hardwood forest understory.
Deer resistant.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Mar 10 2012 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on Apr 10 2014 in Columbia, MD

* excellent video found on Youtube


'Alba'
White flowers, otherwise identical.

* photos taken on Apr 10 2014 in Columbia, MD


'Spring Beauty'
Profuse blooming with each bulb having up to 5 flower spikes.
This vigorous form with larger, deep blue flowers, also grows taller, reaching up to 8 inches.

RELATED PLANTS

Puschkinia scilloides ( Striped Squill )
A bulbous perennial, reaching up to 8 inches in height, that is native to the Caucasus, Turkey and northern Iran. It often quickly naturalizes in the landscape.
The leaves, up to 6 x 0.3 inches in size, go dormant by late spring.
The fragrant, white to bright blue flowers are borne during early spring, barely after the Crocuses emerge. The bloom season lasts up to 3 weeks.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 ( 3 with deep mulch ) in full sun to partial shade on fertile, sandy, well drained soil that is moist during spring. Plant bulbs 4 inches deep and 3 inches apart.

2 comments:

  1. I came across this post as I was trying to identify a perennial in my yard and thanks to your photos, I've been able to positively identify it as scilla hispanica or "Spanish Bluebells." Thank you!

    ReplyDelete