Saturday, May 1, 2010

Honeysuckle

Lonicera
A massive very variable genus of close to 180 species of deciduous or evergreen, trees, climbers or shrubs ranging from noxious weeds to highly ornamental landscape plants.
Some species of Honeysuckle are edible while others are poisonous to cause death. The species with edible fruit may even be tasty and sweet however if you are unsure of identity of a Honeysuckle then DO NOT eat it.
All prefer fertile, well drained soil unless otherwise noted. Prune after flowering to thin out old wood. Propagation is from seed as well as semi-ripe ( mid summer ) or hardwood cuttings ( autumn ) and also removed suckers. The seed can be sown immediately or stratified at 40 F for 3 months.
Some Honeysuckles are prone to Honeysuckle Aphid, which was accidently introduced into North America in the 1970s. It can cause witches broom, stem dieback and sometimes even death of some species of Honeysuckle. Plants affected can be treated with a systemic insecticide. Spider Mites can sometimes also be a problem on hot dry sites.

* photos of unknown internet source


* photo taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario

* photos taken on May 15 2013 in Columbia, MD


Lonicera albertii ( Albert Regal Thorn Honeysuckle )
Also called Lonicera spinosa. A deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 4.5 x 10 feet, that is native to high mountains in the Himalayas and Tien Shan ranges ( Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan; south to Kashmir to northern India, Tibet and western China ) Some records include: 6 years - 44 inches x 7.5 feet. It is a great foundation shrub for harsh climates.
The narrow, fine-textured leaves, up to 1.3 x 0.2 inches in size, are blue-green above, white beneath.
The fragrant, lilac-pink flowers, up to 0.5 inches in length, are borne in pairs during spring.
They are followed by purple or purplish-white berries during autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 8, very drought tolerant. Extremely hardy, it thrives even in Alberta's harsh climate.

Lonicera alpigena ( Alps Honeysuckle )
A medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching around 6 feet, that is native to mountains of central and southern Europe. Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 12 feet.
The oblong leaves, up to 4 x 2 inches, are glossy deep green.
The unscented, yellowish-green flowers, up to 0.5 inches in length, are borne in pairs during spring.
They are followed by scarlet-red berries, up to 0.5 inches across.
Hardy zones 4b to 9, preferring northerly climates, thriving especially well in Ottawa, Ontario and northern New England. It is easy to grow and is very tolerant of harsh conditions.

Lonicera x americana
The hybrid between Lonicera caprifolium & L. etrusca. It is variable in habit, sometimes found as a mounding shrub up to 6 feet in height and sometimes with support - as a very vigorous, woody-stemmed, deciduous to semi-evergreen vine climbing up to 40 x 8 feet in size. Some records include: 5 years - 12+ feet.
The oval to oblong leaves, up to 4 x 2 inches, are rich mid-green.
The abundant, strongly fragrant, large, pink flushed with reddish-purple ( yellow inside ) flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne in clusters up to 12 x 8 inches, during late spring and repeating until autumn frost.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on fertile, well drained soil.
Drought tolerant. It prefers its roots in shade. Propagation is from hardwood cuttings taken during late autumn and semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

'Pam's Pink'
Tolerates as low as -20 F

Lonicera arborescens
A small tree, reaching a maximum size of 30 feet, that is native to southern Spain and northern Africa. The leaves are up to 1.5 x 1 inches.
The pink flowers are followed by orange fruits.

Lonicera x bella
The hybrid between Lonicera morrowii and L. tatarica; forming a very fast growing, very bushy, rounded, large, deciduous shrub, reaching around 9 or more feet. Some records include: largest on record - 20 x 20 feet. This Honeysuckle is potentially invasive in the eastern U.S.
The oblong leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are mid-green.
The abundant, strongly fragrant, white or pink flowers are borne during late spring.
They are followed by glossy red berries.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, hardy in southern Manitoba where Lonicera morrowii struggles.

Lonicera x brownii ( Scarlet Trumpet Honeysuckle )
The hybrid between Lonicera hirsuta & L. sempervirens, that is much more similar to L. sempervirens in habit. It is typically found as a deciduous to semi-evergreen, woody twining vine. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; largest on record - 66 x 66 feet ( with vining support ).
The paired, oval to oblong leaves, up to 3 inches, are blue-green.
The unscented, scarlet-red ( with orange throat ), narrow trumpet-shaped flowers, up to 1.5 inches long, are borne in whorls during late spring, repeating late summer to mid autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun to partial shade ( roots prefer shade ) on fertile well drained soil. Plant against a south facing wall where summers are cool.
Propagate from hardwood cuttings taken during late autumn or semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken on April 4 2012 in Columbia, MD


'Dropmore Scarlet'
Strong growing with larger foliage. The flowers are scarlet-red ( with orange throat ) and long-tubed, borne over a long period from mid summer to mid-autumn.
Resistant to aphids. Originated in Dropmore, Manitoba, Canada.

* photos taken on Aug 30 2012 in Clarksville, MD

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photo taken on June 22 2014 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario


'Mandarin'
Similar, except for intensely orange flowers and foliage that is orangish-bronze at first, turning to glossy deep green. It is the hybrid between Lonicera brownii 'Dropmore Scarlet' and Lonicera tragophylla.

* photo taken on May 20 2014 in Columbia, MD


Lonicera caerulea ( Honeyberry, Haskap )
A fast growing, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching around 7 x 5 feet, that is native to much of central and southern Europe, eastern Siberia, Mongolia, most of northern China, Korea, Japan and northern North America ( subsp edulis from Alaska to far northeast Alberta to Winisk, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to central California to northwest Wyoming to central Minnesota & Wisconsin to Traverse City, Michigan to Port Huron, Michigan to Goderich, Ontario to Orangeville, Ontario to central Pennsylvania to Connecticut ). It is endangered in Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont and New Hampshire. It previously occurred in far northeast Ohio but is now extinct there. Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 16 feet.
The paired, smooth-edged, oblong leaves are up to 3 x 1.3 inches in size. The foliage is mid-green above, paler green beneath. Fall color is not significant.
The strongly fragrant, pale yellow flowers, up to 0.5 inches long, are borne in pairs during early spring. They are great for attracting butterflies.
They are followed by small, deep blue berries, up to 0.7 inches long, during late summer into early autumn. The edible blue fruits are high in antioxidents and Vitamin C. They taste like Blueberries with Black Current overtones. It is a potential agricultural crop in the Great Plains. A single plant can bear up to 15 pounds of fruit per year. All cultivars need another variety for cross pollination for good fruit production to occur ( one plant will pollinate up to 5 of another cultivar ). Despite this being among the fruit crops of highest potential in extreme cold climates...MOST OTHER HONEYSUCKLES ARE NOT EDIBLE.
Hardy zones 2 to 5. Hardy to -50 F, and even the flowers are hardy to 19 F ( even thriving in Alberta and interior Alaska ). It is tolerant of shade as well as drought and pollution. It is easy to grow but well drained soil is essential.

( Additional info on external link - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lonicera_caerulea )

* photo taken by Dr. Nick V. Kurzenko of CalPhotos

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo

* excellent video found on Youtube


'Berryblue'
Large, vigorous and upright in habit with very large, sweet, tasty berries.
Hardy to -58 F, this is among the best of all fruiting plants for cultivation in the northern Great Plains.

'Blue Belle'
Originating from the Kamtchatica region of eastern Siberia. Vigorous, dense and compact in habit, it reaches up to 5 x 4 ( averaging 3 ) feet.
The seedless berries are very tasty and are great eaten fresh or used in ice cream, jams and jellies. Freeze for later use.
Hardy to -58 F, this is among the best of all fruiting plants for cultivation in the northern Great Plains.
It is very rarely bothered by insect pests or disease.

'Blue Moon'
Reaches up to 3 feet in height with abundant blue fruits. 'Blue Velvet' is the recommended pollinator.
Hardy zones 2 +.

'Blue Velvet'
Reaches up to 6.5 x 6.5 ( rarely over 4 ) feet in height with abundant blue fruits. 'Blue Moon' is the recommended pollinator.
Hardy zones 2 +.

'Borealis'
Larger growing, reaching up to 6 feet. 'Berry Blue' is a recommended pollinater.
Hardy zones 4 +.

* photo taken on Nov 11 2014 in Burtonsville, MD


'Cinderella'
Similar to 'Blue Bell' but with slightly larger berries.

'Edulis'
A subspecies, native to much of the boreal forest region of North America, it reaches up to 10 x 9 feet and also bears larger edible fruits. Most cultivars arise from this form.

'Georges Bugnet' ( Sweetberry Honeysuckle )
Sturdy and dense, reaching up to 5.5 x 5.5 feet in 6 years.
The foliage is bright green and the larger than average fruit are edible and tasty.
Extremely hardy, it thrives even in Calgary.

'Svetlana'
Similar to 'Berry Blue' except with abundant fruit crop borne a week earlier.
It originates from the University of Saskatchewan.

'Tundra'
Larger growing, reaching up to 6 feet with larger than usual berries.
'Blue Belle' is a recommended pollinater.

Lonicera canadensis ( Canadian Fly-Honeysuckle )
A deciduous shrub, reaching around 3 ( rarely 7 x 7 ) feet in size, that is native from Saskatchewan to Atikokan, Ontario to Lake Nipigon to Wawa, Ranoke, Ontario to Matagami, Quebec to Nova Scotia; south to Iowa to Indiana to Virginia ( Tennessee, Georgia & North Carolina in Appalatian Mountains ). It is now extinct in Indiana and endangered in Tennessee, Maryland and New Jersey. It is found on moist, rich, mixed or deciduous woodland in the wild.
The narrow ovate to elliptical leaves, up to 3.8 x 2 ( rarely over 3 ) inches in size, are bright green above, paler green beneath.
The hanging, creamy-white, bell-shaped flowers, up to 0.7 inches long, are borne in pairs during late spring.
They are followed by ovoid, orange-red berries, up to 0.3 inches in length, during mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 2 to 7

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Lonicera caprifolium ( Italian Honeysuckle )
A low deciduous shrub to vine ( depending on support ), that is native from Europe to western Asia. Some records include: largest on record - 27 x 10 feet ( vining height ).
It can also be used for large scale groundcover.
The paired, oval leaves, up to 4 x 2.3 inches, are deep blue-green.
The strongly fragrant, creamy-yellow ( tinted pink ) flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne in whorls during spring into early summer.
They are followed by orange-red berries, up to 0.25 inches across.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( possibly 4 based on escaped Michigan Upper Peninsula population and it is reported at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada ), it does not enjoy the hot humid southeastern U.S.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photo


Lonicera chaetocarpa
A deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 7 x 7 feet, that is native to western China.
The oblong leaves, up to 3 x 1.5 inches, are mid-green. The foliage is bristly beneath.
The strongly fragrant, creamy-white, long-tubed flowers are borne singly or paired during spring.
They are followed by red calyced, red berries.
The young stems are bristly.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

Lonicera chrysantha ( Coralline Honeysuckle )
A very ornamental, fast growing, large, deciduous shrub, reaching around 13 feet, that is native to northeastern Asia ( from Siberia, far eastern Mongolia and Manchuria; south through most of central & eastern China, northern Korea and Japan ). Some records include: 10 years - 13 x 8 feet; largest on record - 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 inches. It is closely related to Lonicera xylosteum.
The ovate leaves, up to 5 x 2.5 inches, are green.
The pale yellow flowers, up to 0.8 inches long, are borne during late spring.
They are followed by abundant, showy, glossy pinkish-red berries, up to 0.2 inches wide, during late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.

Lonicera ciliosa ( Orange Honeysuckle )
A fast growing vine, reaching a maximum height of 30 feet, that is native to western North America ( from Vancouver Island to Golden, British Columbia to western Montana, south to northern California to Arizona. The paired, oblong leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are blue-green.
The Orange Honeysuckle is very similar to Lonicera sempervirens, except for having intensely orange flowers.
The flowers are followed by scarlet-red fruits.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.

Lonicera crassifolia
A dense, low, spreading, mat-forming, evergreen groundcover shrub, reaching only 4 inches in height. Some records include: 3 years - width of 3 feet. Its spread can easily be controlled by pruning a few times a year. It is native to woodlands in Yunnan and Sichuan Provinces in western China.
The broadly-elliptic to rounded leaves, up to 1.8 x 1.3 ( usually 0.7 or less ) inches in size, are glossy deep green. The foliage turns to deep red during winter.
The abundant, fragrant, white ( fading to golden-yellow ) flowers are borne during late spring.
They are followed by bluish-black fruits during autumn into winter.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( 5 & 6 on protected sites or with reliable snowcover ) in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil.

Lonicera demissa
A dense, deciduous large shrub, reaching a maximum height of 12 feet, that is native to Japan. It is great for massing on commercial plantings.
The leaves, up to 1.3 inches in length, are dull green.
The showy, pale yellow flowers are borne during early spring.
They are followed by abundant, very attractive, small, scarlet-red berries, up to 0.25 inches wide.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun on just about any well drained soil.

Lonicera dioica ( Limber Honeysuckle )
A twining vine, reaching up to 10 x 8 feet, that is native to northern North America ( from the Yukon to central Northwest Territories to Thompson, Manitoba to Sandy Lake, Ontario to Lansdowne House, Ontario to Fort Albany, Ontario to southeast Quebec; south to eastern Wyoming to Oklahoma to northern Georgia and North Carolina ). It is found in moist open woods and shoreline in the wild. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant at Detroit, around Point Pelee, the Lake Erie islands as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s.
The oppositely-arranged, smooth-edged, rounded leaves are up to 5 x 2.2 inches in size. The foliage is glossy mid-green above, bluish-white beneath.
The pale yellow flowers, up to 1 inch long, are borne during early summer.
They are followed by clusters of scarlet-red berries, up to 0.5 inches wide.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 ( possibly 1 for northeast Alberta seed source ).

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Lonicera etrusca ( Etruscan Honeysuckle )
A very strong growing, semi-evergreen vine, reaching a maximum height of 30 feet, that is native to the Mediterranean region. It can be grown as a free standing shrub if trained, reaching around 6 or very rarely 13 feet.
The paired, oblong leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are bright-green to blue-green.
The fragrant flowers are borne in clusters of 3 at the branch tips during spring.
The flowers are creamy-white with red tints, later turning to yellow.
Hardy zones 7 to 10

'Superba'
Vine, reaching up to 23 feet.

Lonicera ferdinandii
A vigorous, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching around 10 x 10 feet, that is native to Mongolia
The oblong leaves, up to 4 x 1.7 inches in size, are deep green.
The small, bright yellow flowers are borne during spring.
They are followed by scarlet-red berries.
Hardy zones 3 to 8

Lonicera flava ( Yellow Honeysuckle )
An attractive twining vine, reaching up to 10 feet, that is native to the southeastern U.S. ( from eastern Kansas to Missouri to southern Ohio; south to Oklahoma to northern Georgia ). It is great for covering chain-link fences. The leaves, up to 3 inches in length, are luxuriant mid-green above, blue-green beneath. The orangish-yellow flowers, up to 1.5 inches in length, are borne on whorls at the stem tips. They are sometimes followed by orangish-red fruits, up to 0.2 inches across. Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( survives in zone 4b Ottawa, Ontario but barely reaches 3.3 x 3.3 feet ) in partial shade on cool, moist soil. It does not enjoy hot sunny or dry conditions.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Lonicera fragrantissima ( Winter Honeysuckle )
A fast growing, bushy, dense, spreading, deciduous to evergreen shrub, reaching around 12+ feet, that is native to China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 feet; 10 years - 17 x 17 feet; largest on record - 17 x 17 feet.
The leathery, oblong to elliptical leaves, up to 3.5 x 1.5 inches, are deep blue-green, turning to golden-yellow during late autumn.
The foliage appears early in spring.
The strongly-fragrant, creamy-white flowers. up to 0.5 inches across, are borne during late winter to very early spring before the foliage emerges. The scent from the flowers can be detected from as much as 50 feet away.
They are followed by red berries.
The twigs are reddish.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in sun to partial shade on any fertile, well drained soil. Prefers fall planting. Propagation is from seed, hardwood cuttings taken during autumn or semi-ripe cuttings taken in summer.

* photo taken on Mar 23 2011 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Apr 5 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Mar 16 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Mar 1 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 16 2017 in Pikesville, MD

* historic archive photo


Lonicera giraldii
A very striking, scrambling, evergreen shrub, reaching a maximum height of 7 feet, that is native to western China.
The oblong leaves, up to 3.5 x 1 inches, are green, finely hairy yellowish beneath.
The small, yellow flowers are borne in small clusters during summer.
They are followed by purplish-black berries.
The twining stems are finely yellow haired.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

Lonicera gracilipes ( Slenderstalk Honeysuckle )
A deciduous shrub, reaching up to 10 ( rarely over 6.5 ) feet in height, that is native to Japan. It is very rare and rarely seen outside its native range despite its great potential. Some records include: 15 years - 6.3 feet.
The elliptical or obovate leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is rosy-purple at first, turning to luxuriant glossy bright green.
The showy, deep rose-pink ( with yellow anthers ), hanging, tubular flowers, up to 0.8 inches long, are borne during late spring.
They are followed by edible, red fruits during early to mid summer.
The peeling bark is dark gray.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. It has proven to be fully hardy on at Indian Head, Saskatchewan and Brandon, Manitoba on the northern Great Plains.

* historic archive photo


Lonicera gynochlamydea
A medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 13 x 13 feet, that is native to southern and eastern China.
The ovate leaves are up to 4.5 x 1.5 inches in size. The foliage is blue-green.
The white or pink flowers, up to 0.5 inches in length, are borne during late spring.
They are followed by white or purplish-red berries, up to 0.2 inches wide.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( possibly hardier ).

* photo taken on March 28 2010

Lonicera x heckrottii ( Goldflame Honeysuckle )
The hybrid between Lonicera americana & Lonicera sempervirens, forming a woody twining vine requiring climbing support. Some records include: largest on record - 20 x 13 feet ( climbing ).
The oblong, semi-evergreen ( to 15 F ) leaves, up to 4 x 2.3 inches in size, are deep blue-green.
The abundant, fragrant, large, bright pink ( throated orange-yellow ) tubular flowers, are borne in clusters during spring, then sporadically into autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun to partial shade ( prefers roots in shade ) on fertile, well drained soil. Propagation is from hardwood cuttings taken during autumn or semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken on June 22 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on June 1 @ Maryland Horticulturalist Society, Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on May 20 2016 in Columbia, MD


Lonicera henryi
An extremely vigorous, rambler to twining vine, reaching a maximum vining height of 30 feet, that is native to western China. The foliage is semi-evergreen to evergreen depending on climate. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 8 + feet.
The ovate, evergreen leaves, up to 6 x 2 inches, are glossy deep green.
The paired, yellow and red flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are borne in heads during late spring.
They are followed by purplish-black berries.
Hardy zones 4 to 9

* photo taken on March 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum

* photo taken on Feb 8 2014 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Copper Beauty'

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


Lonicera hildebrandiana ( Giant Burmese Honeysuckle )
A very fast to rampant growing, woody twining vine requiring climbing support, that is native from southern China to Burma. Some records include: largest on record - 90 feet ( climbing ). The stems are thick and ropelike.
The oval, evergreen leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are glossy deep green.
The profuse, highly fragrant, very large, creamy-yellow to orange, tubular flowers, up to 8 x 3 inches, are borne in clusters over a very long season.
They are followed by berries, up to 1.2 inches across.
Hardy zones 9 to 11 ( tolerating as low as 20 F ) in full sun to partial shade ( prefers roots in shade ) on fertile, well drained soil. Propagation is from hardwood cuttings taken during autumn or semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* historical archive photo


Lonicera hirsuta ( Hairy Honeysuckle )
A shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 5 feet, that is native to moist upland woods in eastern North America ( from southern Manitoba to Red Lake, Ontario to Lansdowne House, Ontario to Moosonee, Ontario to southern Quebec to Maine; south to central Minnesota to central Michigan to Grand Bend, Ontario to London, Ontario to Long Point, Ontario to northeast Pennsylvania ). It is endangered in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Vermont.
The oppositely-arranged, smooth-edged, oblong leaves are up to 5 x 3.5 ( rarely over 4 x 2 ) inches in size. The foliage is rough, hairy and dull mid-green.
The bright yellow to orangish-yellow flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are borne in clusters, up to 2 inches wide, during late spring to early summer.
They are followed by orange to scarlet-red berries that are borne in clusters during late summer, sometimes lasting into mid-autumn. Hardy zones 2 to 6 in full sun to partial shade on moist soil of any PH. It is recommended for the northern Great Plains.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


Lonicera hispida
An upright, deciduous small shrub, reaching up to 3.3 feet, that is native to mountains from Iran to Kashmir, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstanwestern & central Mongolia; south to Afghanistan to northern India, Nepal to central China.
The oblong to obovate leaves, up to 2.4 x 1.2 inches in size, are hairy mid-green.
The creamy-yellow flowers, up to 0.8 inches long, appear late spring to mid-summer.
They are followed by red berries, up to 0.5 inches wide.
Hardy zones 2 to 6 in full sun on very well drained soil. It is extremely drought tolerant.

Lonicera hispidula ( Pink Chaparral Honeysuckle )
A fast growing, semi-evergreen, climbing vine, reaching up to 18 x 6+ feet, that is native to oak woodland from southwest British Columbia to southern California.
The oval leaves are deep green.
The showy, fragrant, pink ( with yellow stamens ) flowers are borne during spring. The flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
They are followed by glossy red berries during late summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 ( tolerating as low as -15 F ) in partial to full shade. Tolerant of clay, extreme drought or temporary flooding, it requires 30 + inches of yearly rainfall.

* photos taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos


Lonicera 'Honeyrose'
Rounded in habit, reaching up to 7.5 x 7.5 feet in 5 years.
The rounded leaves are deep blue-green.
The deep rose-red flowers are borne during spring.
They are followed by brilliant red fruit during autumn.
Extremely hardy, thriving even in Alberta.

Lonicera iberica ( Iberian Honeysuckle )
A very fast growing, deciduous shrub, reaching around 10 x 12 feet, that is native from the Caucasus to northern Iran and Iraq.
The oblong leaves, up to 2 x 1 inches, are dull green above, lighter green beneath.
The white to pale-yellow, short-tubed, flowers are borne in pairs during early summer.
They are followed by small, scarlet-red berries.
Hardy zones 6 to 9

Lonicera involucrata ( Twinberry )
Also called Lonicera conjugialis. A fast growing, dense, erect deciduous shrub, reaching around 5 feet, that is native from Cordova, Alaska to northern Alberta to Gillam, Manitoba to far northern Ontario to Gaspe Region of Quebec; south to California to New Mexico ( in mountains ) to northern Wisconsin and the Michigan Upper Peninsula to Wawa, Ontario to Matagami, Quebec. It is endangered in Wisconsin and Michigan. Some records include: 10 years - 7 x 11 feet; largest on record - 17 x 17 feet. It is found in moist woodland in the wild.
The oppositely-arranged, smooth-edged, oblong leaves are up to 6 x 3 inches in size, The finely-hairy foliage is glossy deep green above, paler green beneath; usually turning to bright yellow during autumn. The foliage is early to appear during spring.
The yellow to red, short-tubed flowers, up to 0.4 inches long, are borne in pairs during late spring.
They are followed by glossy deep purple berries, up to 0.3 inches wide, with large red-purple bracts. It is cultivated mostly for its fruit.
Hardy zones 1 to 7 in sun or shade on just about any fertile soil. Tolerant of seaside conditions making it great for planting by the sea. Tolerant of urban pollution and moderate drought. Propagatin is from hardwood cuttings taken in autumn or semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photos taken by http://www.nwplants.com

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Lonicera japonica ( Japanese Honeysuckle )
A woody stemmed twining vine that is native to woodlands in China, Korea and Japan. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 30 feet; largest on record - 80 feet ( vining height - typically under half that ). Japanese Honeysuckle can become very invasive, it has ruined many acres of native forests in the southeastern U.S. by crowding out native woodland wildflowers.
The oblong, semi-evergreen to evergreen leaves, up to 3.5 inches in length, are bright green.
The strongly fragrant, white ( aging to pale yellow ) flowers, up to 1.6 inch in length, are borne from late spring into mid or late autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in sun or shade on fertile, well drained soil. It prefers it roots in the shade. Propagation is from seed or as for the cultivars; from hardwood cuttings taken during late autumn or semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* photos taken on May 26 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 24 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 6 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken by W.R. Mattoon @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Aureo-reticulata'
Less invasive than species, reaching no more than 20 feet.
It has very attractive bright green foliage that is netted golden-yellow. It is unfortunately less hardy ( zone 6 + ) and may be cut back by hard freezes.

'Flexuosa'
Foliage and shoots are purplish.

Lonicera korolkowii ( Blueleaf Honeysuckle )
A fast growing, graceful arching deciduous shrub, reaching around 12 feet, that is native to mountains of central Asia, south to southern Pakistan and Afghanistan. Some records include: largest on record - 17 x 20 feet.
The oblong leaves, up to 2 x 1 inches, are downy bright green above, bluish beneath.
The abundant, light pink flowers are borne in pairs during spring.
They are followed by persistent, showy, red berries.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 in full sun on just about any soil. Drought tolerant and prefers regions with hot summers. It should be planted while small as larger plants can be difficult to transplant.

* photos taken on June 14 2012 in Ellicott City, MD
* historic archive photo

* photos taken Aug 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database. North Dakota tree handbook

* historic archive photo


'Blue Velvet'
Aphid resistant, blue-gray foliage.

'Floribunda'
Leaves are ovate. Flowers are white.

'Red Giant'
Originating from subspecies zabelii; it has large deep crimson-red flowers.

Lonicera ledebourii
A medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching around 8 feet, that is native to the western U.S. that is very similar to Lonicera involucrata. Some records include: largest on record - 18 x 13 feet.
The narrow leaves, up to 5 x 1.7 inches, are deep green above, felted beneath.
The orangish-yellow flowers are borne during summer.
They are followed by black berries that are backed by heart-shaped red bracts.
Hardy zones 4 to 9

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos


Lonicera maackii ( Amur Honeysuckle )
A very vigorous, deciduous, very large shrub to small tree, reaching around 15 feet, that is native from southeastern Russia, Mongolia, northern China, Korea to Japan. It is rare in the wild in Japan. Some records include: largest on record - 33 x 38 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.7 feet. It can be pruned into a round headed tree by thinning the canopy and removing lower branches. It has escaped into the wild in parts of the eastern U.S. where it is invasive.
The oblong leaves, up to 3.6 x 1.5 inches, are deep green. The foliage persists late in autumn.
The strongly fragrant, white ( aging to yellow ) flowers, up to 1 inch across, are borne in pairs during spring into early summer.
They are followed by deep red to black berries, up to 0.25 inches across.
The grayish-brown bark is rough and deeply ridged on older plants.
Hardy zones 2 to 8, it thrives especially well on the northern Great Plains.


* photos taken on May 18 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 15 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Oct 1 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken on Apr 11 2015 @ Belmont Mansion, Elkridge, MD

* photos taken on Apr 23 2015 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on June 1 2017 in Howard Co., MD

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database North Dakota tree handbook

* photos taken by Dr. Nick V. Kurzenko @ CalPhotos


'Cling Red'
text coming soon

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.


'Grandiflora'
Vigorous and tall in habit, with very large, pure white flowers.
Very drought tolerant.

'Koehneana'
Larger leaves, up to 4 inches in length, and yellow flowers.

'Rem Red'
text coming soon

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.


Lonicera maximowiczii 'Sakhalinensis ( Sakhalin Honeysuckle )
A fast growing, dense, rounded, large, deciduous shrub, reaching around 9 x 9 feet, that is native from eastern Siberia, Kamchatka and Sakhalin; south to Manchuria, Korea and Japan. Some records include: 5 years - 7 x 9 feet; largest on record - 15 x 15 feet.
The oblong leaves, up to 5 x 2 inches, are reddish at first, turning to deep green above, bluish-white beneath. The foliage turns to intense golden-yellow color during autumn.
The scented, reddish-purple flowers, up to 0.7 inches long, are borne during late spring.
They are followed by scarlet-red berries.
Hardy zone 3 to 6, excellent for harsh climates, even thriving in Alberta, south-central and southeast Alaska.
Thrives in sun or shade, even tolerating deep shade, on just about any moist, well drained soil.

Lonicera morrowii ( Morrow's Honeysuckle )
A fast growing to invasive, loose, spreading, large, deciduous shrub, reaching around 10 x 17 feet, that is native to mountain forests in Manchuria, Korea and much of Japan. Some records include: largest on record - 20 x 34 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.7 feet. It can run wild in parts of northeastern North America, where it's early spring leafing can shade out and kill woodland wildflowers which have evolved to flower before the forest canopy leafs out.
The elliptical leaves, up to 3.2 x 1 inches, are downy purplish at first, turning to mid-green above, finely hairy beneath. The foliage persists late in autumn.
The strongly fragrant, white ( aging to yellow ), short-tubed flowers, up to 0.7 inches long, are borne in pairs during late spring into summer.
They are followed by edible, glossy deep red berries.
Hardy zones 2 to 9, it is extremely hardy and can thrive even in south-central and southeastern Alaska as well as the northern Great Plains.

* photos taken on Aug 2 2013 in Goderich, Ontario

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

* historical archive photo


Lonicera myrtillus ( Myrtle Honeysuckle )
A dense, spreading, small, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum height of 3 feet, that is native to the Himalayas ( from Afghanistan to Tibet and Yunnan Province in China ). It makes a great low hedge.
The narrow oblong to ovate leaves, up to 1 inches in length, are bright green, later turning to deep gray-green above, bluish-white beneath.
The fragrant, creamy-white to pinkish-white flowers are borne during early summer.
They are followed by red berries, up to 0.3 inches wide, during late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( survives in zone 4b Ottawa, Canada with occasional minor winter dieback ) in full sun to partial shade.

Lonicera nitida ( Box Honeysuckle )
A rapid growing, dense, bushy, spreading, medium-sized, evergreen shrub, reaching around 10 feet, that is native to western China. Some records include: 5 years - 10 feet; 10 years - 10 x 13 feet; largest on record - 13 x 17 feet. Box Honeysuckle can be easily sheared and used in much the same manner as Buxus - Boxwood. Great for hedging, especially with its fine-textured foliage.
The oblong leaves, up to 0.5 inches, are rich glossy deep green, turning purplish during winter.
The fragrant, small, creamy-white flowers, up to 0.5 inches, are borne during mid-spring.
They are followed by translucent purplish-blue berries.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( protected site with winter mulch in 6 ) in sun or shade on fertile, well drained soil that is moderately moist during summer. Tolerant of drought, alkaline soil, highly acidic soils, sand, clay, salt spray, wind and urban pollution. It is at least moderately deer resistant. Clip and fertilize frequently for denser habit. Older plants can be cut to the ground to renew, plants may dieback during winter in zone 6, resprouting from ground mid to late spring. Shake off heavy snows since if allowed to persist it can damage the form of the plant.
Propagation is from seed or as for cultivars - from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken on Mar 7 2013 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD
* photos taken on Mar 18 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Baggeson's Gold'
A very attractive, dense, rounded shrub with long arching shoots.
The glossy foliage is bright yellow at first, later turning to green.
Some records include: 10 years - 5 x 6.5 feet; largest on record - 8 x 10 ( rarely over 5 ) feet.

* photos taken on 4th of July @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photo taken on 4th of July 2010 in Washington, D.C.

* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


'Edmee Gold'

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Elegant'
Arching in habit, reaching up to 3.3 x 4 feet in 10 years, eventually to 5 feet in height.
The leaves, up to 0.8 inches in length, are deep green.

'Lemon Beauty'
Very fast growing and dense, reaching up to 6 x 6 ( rarely over 3 x 5 ) feet, with foliage that is deep green and boldly edged lemon-yellow.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photos taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Lemon Queen'
Reaches up to 3 x 4 feet.

'Red Tip'
Dense and rounded in habit, reaching up to 6 x 6 feet or possibly slightly more. The foliage is intense deep red at first during spring, later turning to glossy deep green. Great for hedging, it is a great substitute for Photinia fraseri.

'Silver Beauty'
Fast growing, dense and arching in habit, reaching up to 6 x 5 feet in height. It makes an excellent medium height hedge.
The shiny mid-green foliage is edged in silvery-white.
Prefers partial or dappled shade to prevent leaf scorch.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


'Yunnan'
More upright in habit, with larger leaves, up to 0.8 inches in length.

Lonicera nummularifolia ( Moneywort Honeysuckle )
Also called Lonidera persica. A very ornamental, upright, large, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 18 x 10 feet, that is native from southern Greece to mountains of central Asia; south to Iraq to Pakistan.
The rounded leaves, up to 1.3 x 0.8 inches, are gray and velvety on both sides.
The bright yellow, funnel-shaped flowers are borne during spring.
They are followed by translucent white berries.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on fertile, sandy or gravelly, very well drained soil. It is very drought tolerant.

Lonicera oblongifolia ( Swamp Fly Honeysuckle )
A thicket-forming, upright, deciduous, small shrub, reaching a maximum height of 5 ( rarely over 3 ) feet, that is native to mixed or coniferous swamps and bogs in the boreal forest zone in eastern North America ( from Saskatchewan to Winisk, Ontario to Fort Albany, Ontario to Nova Scotia; south to Minnesota to sw Michigan to Sarnia, Ontario to London, Ontario to Long Point, Ontario to Maine...south to Pennsylvania in mountains ). It is very abundant on limestone outcrops on Manitoulin Island and the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario. It is considered threatened in Maine.
The paired, smooth-edged, oblong leaves are up to 3.5 x 1.6 inches in size. The foliage is bright blue-green above, paler green beneath. There is no fall color, the leaves often persist dried on the shrub well into winter.
The yellow flowers, up to 0.5 inches long, are borne in pairs during early summer. They are highly attractive to honeybees, butterflies and hummingbirds.
They are followed by red berries during autumn.
The older stems have brownish-gray, shredded bark.
Hardy zones 3 to 5 ( 2 for far northern Ontario seed source ) in partial shade to shade on permanently moist to wet soil. It is tolerant of alkaline soils.

* historic archive photo


Lonicera periclymenum ( Woodbine, English Honeysuckle )
A fast growing, deciduous to semi-evergreen, woody-stemmed, scrambling shrub to twining vine, reaching around 20 feet, that is native from England to northern Asia. Some records include: largest on record - 33 x 30 feet ( vining with support ).
The oblong leaves, up to 3.2 inches in length, are finely downy at first, turning to rich mid-green above, smooth bluish-white beneath. The newly emerging foliage is blue-green.
The strongly fragrant, pinkish-red ( yellowish inside ) flowers, up to 2.5 inches in length, are borne in whorls of 3 to 5 during late spring into summer.
They are followed by showy red berries, up to 0.25 inches across.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 on fertile soil that is rich in organic matter. Prefers full sun to partial shade on the foliage and shade at the roots. Propagation is from seed or as for the cultivars: hardwood cuttings taken during late autumn and semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

'Belgica' ( Dutch Honeysuckle )
More compact in habit with very fragrant and very abundant flowers borne late spring then repeating later during summer.

* photo taken on Aug 4 2012 in Bayfield, Ontario


'Graham Thomas'
Abundant, very fragrant, large white flowers that age to yellow.

'Serotina' ( Late Dutch Honeysuckle )
Has narrow leaves ( up to 3 inches in length ) and very fragrant flowers that are purple on the outside, yellow on the inside. They are followed by abundant red berries.

Lonicera pileata ( Privet Honeysuckle )
A fast growing, dense, low, stiff horizontal spreading, semi-evergreen to evergreen shrub, that is native to Hubei and Sichuan Provinces in China. Some records include: largest on record - 4 x 13 feet. Privet Honeysuckle makes an excellent groundcover.
The oval to oblong, "privet-like" leaves are up to 1.5 x 0.6 inches in size. The foliage is glossy deep green above, pale green beneath.
The fragrant, very small, creamy-white flowers are borne in pairs during mid-spring.
They are followed by translucent light purple berries.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in sun or shade on fertile well drained soil. Tolerant of sea spray and at least moderately deer resistant.. Propagation is from semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photo taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


'Moss Green'
A compact, low, spreading form with thick deep green leaves.

* photos taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore, PA



Lonicera praeflorens
A very attractive, dense, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum height of 6.5 feet, that is native to eastern Siberia, Manchuria and Korea.
The broadly-ovate leaves are up to 3 x 1.8 inches in size. The foliage is mid-green above, pale green beneath.
The showy, pink flowers appear during mid-spring before the foliage emerges.
They are followed by round, red berries, up to 0.3 inches wide, during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 7, it thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada but is hardly known elsewhere in North America.

Lonicera x purpusii
The hybrid between Lonicera fragrantissima & l. standishii.
An bushy, dense, rounded, upright, semi-evergreen shrub, reaching around 8 feet. Some records include: largest on record - 17 x 15 feet.
The oval to ovate leaves, up to 4 x 1.5 inches, are deep green above, paler blue-green beneath.
The very fragrant, small, creamy-white flowers are borne in clusters of 2 to 4 during late winter to early spring before the foliage emerges.
They are followed by red berries.
Hardy zones 4b to 9 ( hardier than either parent, thriving in zone 4b Ottawa, Canada ) in full sun to partial shade on any fertile soil. Prune to restrict size and remove dead wood immediately after flowering. Propagation can be from hardwood cuttings taken during autumn and semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

'Winter Beauty'
Extremely fragrant flowers; otherwise similar to species.

Lonicera pyrenaica ( Pyrenean Honeysuckle )
An attractive erect small shrub, reaching a maximum size of 7 x 6 feet ( 4 x 4 or rarely 6 feet in 10 years ), that is native from the eastern Pyrenees to the Balearic Islands in Spain.
The oblong leaves, up to 1.5 x 0.3 inches, are blue-green.
The creamy-white ( flushed pink ), bell-shaped flowers are borne in pairs during spring.
They are followed by red berries.
Hardy zones 5 to 8

Lonicera quinquelocularis ( Mistletoe Honeysuckle )
A large shrub to small tree, reaching around 14 feet, that is native to the Himalayas from Afghanistan to Tibet. Some records include: largest on record - 27 feet with a trunk diameter of 11 inches.
The oblong leaves, up to 3 x 1.6 inches in size, are velvety, mid-green.
The abundant, strongly fragrant, pale yellow flowers, up to 0.8 inches long, are borne in pairs during early summer.
They are followed by very showy, small, translucent white berries.
The deeply fissured bark is a combination of tan and black.
Hardy zones 4b to 9, it thrives at Dominion Arboetum in Ottawa, Canada but is generally unknown in cultivation in North America.

Lonicera ruprechtiana ( Manchurian Honeysuckle )
A vigorous deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum height of 12 feet ( less often a scrambling vine reaching as much as 20 feet ), that is native to northeastern Asia ( eastern Russia, Manchuria and northern Korea ).
The pointed, ovate leaves, up to 4 x 1.5 inches, are green.
The white fading to yellow flowers, up to 0.7 inches in length, are borne in pairs during late spring into summer.
They are followed by translucent red berries.
The young stems are downy.
Hardy zones 2 to 6, it thrives especially well on the northern Great Plains.

Lonicera sempervirens ( Trumpet Honeysuckle )
A vigorous, woody twining vine requiring climbing support, that is native to eastern North America ( from eastern Kansas to central Kentucky to northeast Ohio to northern New York State; south to central Texas to central Florida ). It is endangered in Kansas. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 17 feet; largest on record - 66 feet ( climbing ).
The oval, evergreen leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are glossy deep green, often turning to yellow during autumn.
The abundant, fragrant, large, bright scarlet-red ( throated yellow ) tubular flowers, up to 2 inches in length, are borne in stem tip whorls. It blooms heavily for about 5 weeks from mid to late spring, then sporadically until early autumn.
This is among the best plants for attracting hummingbirds.
The flowers are followed by red berries, up to 0.25 inches across, during autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun to partial shade ( prefers roots in shade ) on fertile, well drained soil. Hot summer sun is needed to ripen the wood to survive winters in cold climates. Drought tolerant. Trumpet Honeysuckle may sometimes be attacked by aphids, though that occurs less often in shade. Propagation is from hardwood cuttings taken during autumn or semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer. Install small container grown plants...it does not enjoy transplanting. It is not generally eaten by deer.

* photo taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* photos taken on Apr 23 2015 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Sep 16 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photos taken on Apr 14 2017 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photo taken by Clarence A. Rechenthin @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


'Alabama Crimson'
Pure red flowers.

'Blanche Sandman'
More compact in habit, reaching about 20 x 12 feet if not pruned back.
The abundant, very showy, large flowers are orange-red with a yellow throat.

* photos taken on June 12 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 25 2013 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on May 20 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 24 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 2015 in Harford Co., MD

* photo taken on June 18 2016 in Harford Co., MD

* photo taken on Oct 2 2016 in Harford Co., MD


'Cedar Lane'
Abundant red flowers on this repeat bloomer; otherwise similar to species.
Hardy zones 4 +.

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'John Clayton'
Golden-yellow flowers on this repeat bloomer, otherwise identical.

* photos of unknown internet source


* photo taken on June 22 2014 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Major Wheeler'
The exceptionally abundant, orange-red, tubular flowers are borne late spring through early autumn on this repeat bloomer. There are few hardy vines better for attracting hummingbirds.
It looks great planted on a lattice fence with blue spirea or dwarf butterfly bush in front.
The luxuriant green, mildew resistant foliage remains healthy green all summer. Fast growing.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

* photos taken on July 30 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC


'Sulfurea'
Abundant, showy, golden-yellow flowers.

'Superba'
Larger brighter red flowers.

* photo of unknown internet source


Lonicera setifera
A rare, small to medium-sized, deciduous shrub. Some records include: 10 years - 7 x 5 feet.
The coarsely toothed, lance-shaped to ovate leaves, up to 3.2 inches in length, are bristly, luxuriant mid-green.
The fragrant, white flowers are borne in pairs during late winter to early spring before the foliage emerges.
The stems are bristly.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

Lonicera similis delavayi ( Delavay Honeysuckle )
A very fast growing, evergreen vine, reaching up to 26 feet, that is native to Yunnan Province in western China.
It is similar to Lonicera japonica for having larger flowers and leathery foliage. The oval leaves, up to 2 inches in length, are deep green.
The fragrant, white to pale yellow flowers are borne in pairs late summer into mid-autumn.
They are followed by black berries.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 in full sun to partial shade. It thrives in milder parts of the British Isles. It is moderately mildew resistant.

Lonicera standishii ( Standish Honeysuckle )
A large, semi-evergreen shrub, reaching around 10 feet, that is native to China. Some records include: 5 years - 7 feet; 10 years - 17 x 17 feet; largest on record - 17 x 17 feet. It may have invasive potential in parts of eastern North America.
The oblong leaves, up to 5 x 2 inches, are deep green and covered in fine hairs.
The strongly fragrant, creamy-white flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are borne in pairs during winter into spring.
They are followed by red berries.
The attractive bark is peeling.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil.

* photo taken on Nov 17 2012 in Columbia, MD


'Budapest'
Foliage bronze at first, otherwise identical to species.

Lonicera stenantha
A very attractive, dense, arching to spreading, medium-size, deciduous shrub, reaching around 6 feet, that is native from northern Iran to the central Asian mountains; south to Afghanistan to northern China. Some records include: largest on record - 8 x 12 feet.
The leathery, obovate or elliptical leaves, up to 3 x 1.3 inches in size, are luxuriant bright green.
The yellowish-white flowers, up to 0.3 inches long, are borne in pairs during spring.
They are followed by large, bluish-black berries.
Hardy zones 3 to 8. Pollution tolerant.

Lonicera subspicata ( Chaparral Honeysuckle )
A fast growing, arching, evergreen shrub, reaching up to 5 x 4 feet, that is native to oak forests in central and southern California. It will climb with support.
The oval leaves, up to 2 inches in length, are green.
The creamy-white to yellow flowers are borne during spring. The flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
They are followed by glossy red berries during late summer.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil. Very drought tolerant, it requires 12 + inches of yearly rainfall.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos


Lonicera syringantha ( Lilac Honeysuckle )
A graceful, dense, upright to arching, medium-sized shrub that is native frpm Tibet to central China. Some records include: 10 years - 8 x 10 feet; largest on record - 13 x 13 feet.
The oblong leaves, up to 1.3 inches, are blue-green.
The highly fragrant, small, soft-lilac flowers are borne in pairs during mid spring ( persisting sporadically into early summer ).
They are followed by red berries.
Hardy zones 3 to 9, hardiness seems to vary with seed source with some clones acting more like a perennial in zone 4b Ottawa Valley of Canada.

Lonicera tatarica ( Tatarian Honeysuckle )
A vigorous, dense, bushy, erect, large, deciduous shrub, reaching around 15 feet, that is native to southern Russia and central Asia. It has naturalized locally in eastern North America to as far north as Kapuskasing. Some records include: 10 years - 17 x 30 feet ( usually closer to 15 x 15 feet ); largest on record - 27 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 inches.
The oblong leaves, up to 3.5 x 1.6 inches in size, are deep green above, blue-gray beneath. The foliage appears very early in spring.
The strongly fragrant, white to pink, tubular flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are borne in pairs during spring into summer.
They are followed by small, bright orange to red berries borne mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 1 to 7 in full sun to partial shade, it is extremely hardy and will even thrive in interior central Alaska and the northern Great Plains. It blooms on second year wood, so hard pruning during summer and on will prevent following year blooms. The introduced Russian Aphid can ruin plants growing in eastern North America. Propagation is from seed sown during fall, also hardwood cuttings during autumn or semi-ripe cuttings in summer.

* photo of unknown internet source


'Alba'
White flowers

'Arnold's Red'
Fragrant deep red flowers.

'Grandiflora'
Large white flowers.

'Latifolia'
Pink flowers that are double in size.
The leaves are larger than that of the species.

'Sunstar'
Fast growing, reaching as much as 2 x 3.5 feet in 2 years and 7.5 x 8.5 feet in 5 years, eventually more.
The blue-green leaves turn to yellow during autumn.
The white flowers are later followed by red berries.
Extremely hardy, thriving even in Alberta's harsh climate. Resistant to aphids.

'Zabellii'
Bright pink flowers.

Lonicera x tellmanniana
The hybrids between Lonicera sempervirens & Lonicera tragophylla, it is a vigorous, woody twining vine requiring climbing support. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10 feet; largest on record - 25 feet ( climbing ).
The large, oval to oblong, deciduous leaves, up to 4 x 2 inches, are deep green above, white beneath.
The abundant, fragrant, large, bright orange, slender tubular flowers, up to 2 x 1 inches, are borne in clusters of 8 to 12 during late spring into early summer. The flowers are reddish-orange in bud.
Hardy zones 4b to 9 ( thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada ). It is easy to grow in full sun or shade ( prefers roots in shade ) on fertile, well drained soil. Propagation is from hardwood cuttings taken during autumn or semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

Lonicera thibetica ( Tibetan Honeysuckle )
A very attractive, deciduous, spreading to upright shrub that is native to Tibet and China. Some records include: largest on record - 6.5 x 11 feet.
The oblong leaves, up to 1.5 inches in length, are glossy deep green above, white hairy beneath.
The pale purple flowers are borne in pairs during summer.
They are followed by red berries.
Hardy zones 4 to 9

Lonicera tomentella ( Tufted Honeysuckle )
A medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum height of 13 ( rarely over 6 ) feet, that is native to the Himalayas ( northeast India to southwest China, south to Burma ).
The lance-shaped to ovate leaves, up to 1.6 x 0.6 inches in size, are gray-green to blue-green.
The white ( with red tips ) flowers are borne in clusters during early summer.
They are followed by small, bluish-black fruits, up to 0.2 inches wide.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in sun or shade.

Lonicera tragophylla ( Chinese Woodbine )
A very fast growing, woody twining vine requiring climbing support, that is native to China. Some records include: largest on record - 50 feet ( climbing ).
The oval, deciduous leaves, up to 5 inches, are blue-green.
The profuse, showy, large, yellow, tubular flowers, up to 3.5 inches in length, are borne in large clusters during late spring.
They are followed by red berries.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun to partial shade ( prefers roots in shade ) on fertile, well drained soil. Propagation is from hardwood cuttings taken during autumn or semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* historic archive photo


Lonicera trichosantha
Also called L. deflexicalyx. A graceful, arching to weeping, deciduous, large shrub, reaching a maximum height of 17 ( rarely over 10 ) feet, that is native from southern Tibet to central China.
The oblong or obovate leaves are up to 4 x 1.5 inches in size.
The abundant, pale yellow flowers appear during early summer.
They are followed by orangish-red berries, up to 0.3 inches wide, during late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 4 to 7, it thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada but is generally unknown in North America.

Lonicera utahensis ( Utah Honeysuckle )
A small shrub, very similar to Lonicera canadensis, reaching a maximum height of 5 feet, that is native to western North America ( from Bella Coola, British Columbia to Golden, British Columbia to Lloydminster, Alberta to central Montana & central Wyoming; south to Oregon to southern Utah ). It is critically endangered in Alberta.
The oblong leaves, up to 2.5 inches in length, are bright green.
The strongly fragrant flowers are borne in pairs during spring.
They are followed by edible, orange-red berries.
Hardy zones 3 to 8

Lonicera webbiana ( Webb's Honeysuckle )
Also called Lonicera heterophylla. A rounded, large, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum height of 13 feet, that is native to southeast Europe as well as the Himalayas from Kashmir and Afghanistan to western China. It is a common forest understory shrub over a wide range in the Himalayan Mountains.
The elliptical leaves are up to 7 x 2 ( rarely over 5 x 1 ) inches. The foliage is deep green.
The deep reddish-purple flowers are borne during late spring.
They are followed by red fruits up to 0.25 inches wide.
Hardy zones 4 to 8, it thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada but is generally unknown in North America.

Lonicera x xylosteoides ( Vienna Honeysuckle )
The hybrid between Lonicera tatarica & L. xylosteum; forming a moderate growing, twiggy, upright, medium-sized, deciduous shrub. Some records include: largest on record - 10 x 12 ( rarely over 7 x 9 ) feet.
The oblong leaves, up to 2.5 inches in length, are fine hairy, blue-green.
The light red flowers are borne in pairs during spring into summer.
They are followed by yellow to red berries.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 ( tolerating as low as -40 F ) preferring deep, humus-rich soil. It is very alkaline tolerant and thrives even in south-central and southeastern Alaska. Very urban tolerant.

'Clavey's Dwarf'
A fast growing, dense, rounded, medium-sized shrub that makes an excellent hedge.
Some records include: 10 years - 3.3 x 3.3 feet; largest on record - 10 x 10 feet.
The foliage is blue-green.
The flowers are creamy-white.
Hardier, north to zone 2.

'Miniglobe'
A dwarf globular form, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 4 feet, with luxuriant emerald green foliage. Hardy zones 3 to 8

Lonicera xylosteum ( Fly Honeysuckle )
A fast growing, erect, dense, bushy, large, deciduous shrub that is native to woodlands from Europe to eastern Siberia. Some records include: 10 years - 10 x 13 feet; largest on record - 10 x 13 feet. It is highly recommended for the northern Great Plains and Midwest. It is locally naturalized in Ontario to as far north as Lion's Head.
The oblong leaves, up to 3 x 2 inches, are finely hairy and green.
The foliage appears early in spring.
The strongly fragrant, small, creamy-yellow flowers, up to 0.6 inches, are borne in pairs during late spring.
The Fly Honeysuckle typically flowers on older wood, most profusely on the lower part of the plant. This Honeysuckle is pollinated by flies ( most Honeysuckles are pollinated by Bumblebees ).
They are followed by scarlet-red ( rarely yellowish-orange ) berries during late summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 2 to 6 in full sun to partial shade on any fertile soil. Drought and lime tolerant. It has thrived in trials at Indian Head, Saskatchewan and Brandon, Manitoba on the northern Great Plains. Propagation is from seed sown in autumn or spring; also from hardwood cuttings taken during autumn or semi-ripe cuttings taken during summer.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken on Apr 24 2015 in Clarksville, MD


'Emerald Mound'
A dense, low growing, mounded groundcover form, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 8 ( rarely over 3 ) feet.
The luxuriant blue-green foliage is honeysuckle Aphid resistant.

'Miniglobe'
Dense and globular in habit, reaching up to 4 x 4 feet. It can be used as a Boxwood substitute in extremely cold climates though non-evergreen. The foliage is deep green.

2 comments:

  1. I need help with setting up a chain link fences in Guelph. To put around my flowers.

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  2. I haft da drop more one I've never seen da utahnensis one might haft to look into getting one

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