Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Carex - Ornamental Sedge

A large genus of decorative or groundcover plants that are shade loving relatives of the Grasses. Many have extreme potential for landscaping and are very easy to grow.
Ornamental Sedges can be used alot more in landscaping than they currently are. Some can even be used to replace lawns in the shade. The Sedges listed below are NOT invasive. Deer do not like Sedges but I know you will. Sedges are rarely prone to insect pests or disease.









* photo taken on annual Horticultural Society of Maryland Garden Tour



* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


Carex albicans


* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Carex alburina

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014
Carex amphibola ( Creek Sedge )

* photos taken on June 18 2013 in Columbia, MD


Carex appalachica ( Appalatian Sedge )
A low groundcover similar to Carex pennsylvanica, that reaches up to 6 inches x 1.5 feet, that is native to mountain forests of eastern North America ( from Quebec to South Carolina ).
It has very fine, weeping, narrow hair-like foliage.
Excellent groundcover for dry shade and often grows under Hemlocks in the wild.
Hardy zones 4a to 7 in partial to full shade on well drained soil.

* photo taken on Aug 3 2011 in Luzerne Co, PA

* photos taken on Sep 14 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC


Carex bergerenii
Forming a loose tufty clump up to 2 feet x 9 inches in size. The blunt, blue-green to metallic gray ( reddish-brown in autumn and winter ) leaf blades are up to 2 feet in length. Looks great in the oriental theme landscape.
The flower spikes are small and brown.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in sun or partial shade on moist soil.

Carex buchananii ( Leatherleaf Sedge )
Forms a moderate growing, tufted, erect to arching clump, up to 3 x 3 feet, with pendulous, narrow, red-bronze, very narrow, hair-like leaf blades, up to 3 feet in length.
Looks great next to water or with conifers.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in partial to full shade on cool, moist, fertile soil.
It may be grown as far north as Michigan on a protected site.
Plants can be kept neat looking by occasionally combing out old foliage and debris.
Divide during spring.

'Bronze Mound'
Foliage is bronze-brown.

* photo taken on Aug 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario

* photo taken on Oct 17 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC


'Frosty Curls'
Lower growing, only reaching a foot in height, with whitish foliage that is sometimes curled at the tips.

Carex caryophylla ( Vernal Sedge )
A moderate growing, perennial Sedge, reaching up to 1 foot in height, that is native to northeastern North America ( New York State to New Brunswick; south to Maryland ). It is also native to northern Europe and parts of western Asia. It looks great used along walkways, as groundcover and in containers.
The finely textured, narrow leaves are up to 10 inches in length. The foliage is evergreen in mild climates.
It prefers partial shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. It is tolerant of wet soils.

'Beatlemania'
Forms a clump up to 10 inches x 2 feet, with narrow green leaves that are edged in golden-yellow. It is very attractive and makes a great substitute for Variegated Liriope in the north.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( tolerating -20 F ).

'The Beatles'
A miniature Sedge grass forming a domed clump, up to 8 inches x 1.5 feet, of solid deep green, thin textured, very narrow foliage.
Looks great used in the same way as Dwarf Mondo Grass, whether with bulbs, between paving stones or along deeply shaded walkways.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 prefering moist fertile soil in partial to full shade. It may be much hardier than listed, having been known to survive winters in Saskatchewan

Carex cherokeensis ( Cherokee Sedge )
A fast growing, clumping, evergreen perennial, reaching up to 2 x 4 foot, that is native to eastern North America ( Oklahoma and Missouri to Virginia; and south ). It is endangered in the wild. It makes a very attractive groundcover.
The very narrow leaves are rich glossy deep green.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( possibly 5 ) in partial to full shade preferring moist, well drained soil though it is moderately drought tolerant. The Cherokee Sedge is also very heat tolerant. Cut back to near groundlevel during late winter.

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Carex comans ( New Zealand Hair Sedge )
Forms an evergreen clump up to 3 x 6 feet with soft fine textured leaf blades that are silvery-green fading to near white towards the tips. The very narrow, arching, hairlike, evergreen leaf-blades are up to 2 feet in length.
Great in the landscape or patio planters / containers. Looks great in the rock garden and trailing over stone walls.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade. Drought tolerant.

* photo taken on July 30 2013 in Columbia, MD


'Amazon Mist'


* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Bronze'
Bronze color foliage.

'Frosted Curls'
Reaches up to 2 x 3 feet, with thin, silvery-green leaves that are ruffled at the tip.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis ( havlis.cz )


Carex conica 'Marginata'
Also called 'Snowline'. Forms a slow growing, mounded clump up to 1 x 1.5 feet, with white leaves with a thin deep green center band.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in partial to full shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil. Tolerates sun only if soil is consistantly moist. Propagate by dividing during early spring.

Carex dipsacea ( Autumn Sedge )
Forms a clump, up to 32 inches x 2 feet, with green-bronze foliage that turns orange-red during autumn.
Hardy zones 7 to 9

Carex divulsa
Forms an evergreen clump, up to 15 inches x 2.5 feet, with narrow, luxuriant mid-green foliage.
Hardy zones 4a to 9. Very tolerant of heat and humidity.

Carex dolichostachya var. glaberrima

* photo taken on Oct 17 2013 in Olney, MD


Carex dolichostachya 'Kaga Nishiki' ( Gold Fountain Sedge )
Forms a moderate growing, long-lived, handsome, semi-evergreen to evergreen clump, reaching up to 2 x 2 feet.
The cascading, narrow foliage, up to 0.25 inches wide, is deep green, variegated with golden-yellow margins.
Hardy zones 5 to 9, in partial shade to full shade and drought.

* photo taken on Oct 17 2013 in Olney, MD

* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Carex edurnea ( Bristle-Leaf Sedge )
A widespread but rare native in the U.S., that forms a clump up to 6 x 8 inches.
This Sedge looks similar in habit to Festuca glauca ( Blue Fescue ).
The very narrow, soft, fine-textured foliage is luxuriant mid-green.
hardy zones 2a to 8. Very soil tolerant.


Carex elata ( Tussock Sedge )
Also called Carex stricta. It is a moderate growing, widespread Europeam native, reaching up to 4 x 5 feet with luxuriant bright green, sword-shaped, evergreen leaf blades and star-shaped flowers.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun or partial shade. It loves fertile, moist to wet soil tolerant making it an excellent wetland plant.

'Aurea'
Foliage is glowing bright green with a yellow margin.

'Bowles Golden' ( Gold Sedge )
Reaches up to 4 x 4 feet with evergreen leaf blades that are bright golden-yellow with a narrow mid-green leaf margin. The foliage often fades to yellowish-green in the center by mid summer. Looks great when massed of used at waters edge.
Requires moist soil.


* photo taken on Sep 21 2013 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on May 3 2014 in Baltimore Co., MD


Carex flaccosperma ( Blue Wood Sedge )
A moderate growing, slowly rhizomatous, strong-clumping groundcover perennial, reaching up to 1 x 2 feet, that is native to rich woods and bottomland forests in North America ( Nebraska to Illinois to Maryland; south to Texas to Florida ). This amazingly tough and versitile plant is a great substitute for the overabundant Liriope.
The quilted leaves, up to 0.5 inches across, are bright blue in color. Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial shade to full shade on just about any soil. Moderately drought tolerant as well as thriving on wet sites. It is drought tolerant once established. Cut back to 3 inches in height during early spring before new growth begins. Deer resistant.

* photo taken on June 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Carex flagellifera ( Weeping Brown New Zealand Sedge )
A perennial reaching up to 3 x 2 ( rarely over 2 ) feet with orange to brown, arching, fine-textured, hair-like foliage.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( 6 on protected site ) in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil.

Carex fraseri ( Frasers Sedge )
A slow growing, evergreen clump forming grass reaching up to 2 x 2 feet, that is native to moist woodlands in the southeastern U.S. from Pennsylvania, south to Tennessee & Georgia, where it is endangered.
The broad, leathery, strap-shaped leaf blades, up to 24 x 2 inches, are glossy deep black-green.
The greenish-white flower, up to 0.5 inches across, is borne on a single stalk up to 6 inches in height.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, fertile soil.

Carex glauca ( Blue Sedge )
A dense, vigorous, long-lived, semi-evergreen to evergreen grass that is stoloniferous, forming large colonies in just 2 years. It generally reaches up to 16 inches x 28 inches though may sometimes reach as much as 2 feet in height.
The linear leaves are very narrow, up to 0.2 inches wide.
Blue Sedge is a cool season grass, starting into growth early in spring. Blue Sedge is native to sand dunes, moist prairies and marshes in Canada and the northeastern U.S., especially Michigan and New York.
It is very soil tolerant and can even be used for groundcover and erosion control.
It is not invasive and can even be clipped like a lawn, endures light foot traffic and even competition with tree roots.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 thriving in sun or shade on moist, fertile soil.
Tolerant of alkaline soils, flooding and salt, making it an excellent plant for parking lot and highway medians where most plants will not grow. Blue Sedge can also be grown in water as deep as 2 inches. It is NOT eaten by deer.
It performs much better in the Mid Atlantic region than does Blue Fescue which thins out in our hot humid summers. Carex glauca should always be cut back hard or mowed in early spring to make room for fresh new growth.


* photos taken on October 9 2010 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Aug 12 2011 in Columbia, MD




* photos taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore, PA


* photos taken on Sep 3 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 17 2012 in Columbia, MD


'Barton's Blue'
Wider and even more blue foliage.
* photos taken on May 10 2012 in Columbia, MD


'Blue Zinger'
Reaches up to 20 inches with attractive mounding blue-gray foliage.
It is more clumping than regular Blue Sedge, only reaching an average 2 feet in width in 5 years.

* photo taken on Aug 1 2013 in Stratford, Ontario ( color in photo washed out by reflected sun )

* photo taken on on July 18 in Columbia, MD


Carex glaucescens


* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Carex grayi ( Morning Star Sedge )
An eastern North American native, forming a deciduous clump, up to 4 x 3 feet, with bright to mid-green, leathery, narrow leaf blades, up to 40 x 0.5 inches.
The star-shaped flower heads borne during summer, are up to 1 inch across. They are green ripening to brown.
It is an excellent plant for use next to water.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in partial to full shade on moist fertile soil. Moderately drought tolerant. Easily propagated from seed.

Carex hachijoensis ( Variegated Japanese Sedge )

'Evergold'
Forms a moderate growing, evergreen clump reaching a maximum size of 2 x 3.5 feet, though typically not exceeding 1.5 feet in height.
The very showy foliage is typically bright yellow with a narrow green center stripe.
The fine-textured leaves, are up to 15 x 0.15 inches.
Looks great in planters. Is also an excellent plant for mixing with Crocus's.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 on moist shady sites.




* photos taken on June 19 2010 in Columbia, MD





* photos taken on Oct 30 2011 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on July 17 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photos taken on Mar 15 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* photos taken on Aug 29 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 22 2013 in Towson, MD


Carex laxiculmis
An evergreen groundcover perennial, reaching up to 1 foot x 16 inches, forming an attractive tuft of deep green leaf blades, up to 14 x 0.5 inches. It is native to eastern North America from Minnesota to Ontario & Quebec; south to Missouri to Alabama & Florida.
Hardy zones 5 to 10 in partial to full shade on moist to wet soil. Cut to ground near ground during very early spring to clean out old tired foliage, this is also a good time to divide the clumps.

* photos taken on Oct 19 2013 in Columbia, MD


'Bunny Blue'
Also called 'Hobb'. Similar, except with metallic silvery-blue leaf blades. It makes an excellent plant for the rock garden.

* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* photo taken on Oct 19 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Carex montana ( Mountain Sedge )
Reaches up to 10 inches.
Hardy zones 4 to 9

Carex morrowii ( Japanese Sedge )
A fast growing, Japanese native forming an evergreen turfed clump ( reaching maximum size of 32 x 44 inches ) with long, narrow, arching, sword-shaped foliage up to 32 inches in length. Makes a good groundcover for the woodland understory.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in partial to full shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil.
Somewhat drought tolerant. Cut back during early spring.

'Aureovariegata'
Foliage is bright whitish-yellow with a narrow deep green margin. Great for using with Blue Hosta's and Burgundy Heuchera to brighten up a dark shady gardens.

'Fisher's Form'
Reaches up to 1.5 feet, with deep green leaves that are edged in white.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial shade.

'Goldband'
Foliage is centered creamy-white with a green margin. Great for the rock garden.

'Ice Dance'
Very vigorous, reaching a maximum size of 2.5 x 4 feet, spreading to create an excellent low maintenance groundcover for shady sites.
The narrow, grassy, semi-evergreen foliage is glossy deep green and edged in pure white.
The leaf blades are wider than most other Carex morrowii cultivars.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in sun or shade. Drought tolerant once established.
Extremely tough, it even does well with dense tree root competition.

* photo taken on Aug 4 2012 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos taken on Mar 8 2013 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD
* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on Oct 22 2013 in Towson, MD

* photo taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, Washington, DC

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Silk Tassel'
Forms a silky clump, reaching up to 1 x 2 feet. It is among the most beautiful of all Sedges when used in mass plantings.
The very narrow, deep green leaves are margined in white. It is a cultivar of var temnolepis that was introduced by Barry Yinger.

'Silver Sceptre'
Also called Carex stricta 'Variegata'; is a beautiful rhizomatous-spreading clump forming plant with narrow, arching, evergreen leaves, up to 0.25 inches in width, with a bright white margin.
Though typically smaller, on ideal sites, a clump can reach up to 1.5 x 3.3 feet in size, spreading slowly by rhizomes. The plant appears silvery from a distance and is excellent for brightening up a dark corner.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in partial to full shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil. Long lived and easy to grow.

* photo taken on June 17 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on on July 18 in Columbia, MD


'Temnoleptis' ( Silk Tassle Sedge )
Fine-textured narrow leaves, otherwise similar to regular Carex morrowii.
Hardy zones 5 to 9


* photos taken on 4th of July 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum


* photos taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Variegata'
A rhizomatous moderate spreading, forming a deciduous to evergreen ( depending on climate ) clump up to 2 x 3 feet.
The broad sword-shaped leaves, up to 18 x 1 inches, are deep green with a bold broad creamy-white margin. The luxuriant bright green spring foliage is tinged with pink. It is very stable, rarely reverting.
Hardy zones 4 to 9, preferring partial shade on moist, fertile soil. Tolerant of full sun.


* photo taken on Feb 2009 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.




* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.



Carex muskingumensis ( Palm Sedge )
Forms a moderate growing, graceful, dense, rhizomatous, tropical appearing foliage clump reaching a maximum size of 3.5 x 5 ( usually under 2.5 ) feet, with attractive, luxuriant glossy bright green foliage that resembles Palm fronds. The foliage turns yellow during mid to late autumn after the first frost ( evergreen in very mild climates ). Palm Sedge looks great combined with the coarse foliage of Liqularia, Rodgersia and Hostas. It can even be used in containers on shaded patios as long as it is kept wet.
Palm Sedge is a native to the North American Great Lakes ( Minnesota to Ontario; south to e Kansas to Kentucky ) that looks great planted next to water due to its Papyrus-like appearance and can even be used for erosion control on river banks. It is native to flood plains and wooded swamps.
The flower stalks reach up to 44 inches in height.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in fertile, moist to wet soil in sun or shade. Palm Sedge can even be grown in shallow water up to 4 inches in depth.

'Ice Fountain's' ( Variegated Palm Branch Sedge )
Reaches up to 2.5 feet with green foliage that has variegation that is white at first then fading to bright green by the middle of summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist soil.

'Little Midge'
Similar to species but dwarf.

'Oehme'
Reaches up to 3 x 3.7 ( rarely over 2 ) feet in size, with foliage that is green and variegated with a yellow border.
Hardy zones 4 to 8

'Sentry'
Attractive weeping foliage.

'Wachtposten'
Upright in habit, reaching up to 3 feet in height.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 and drought tolerant.

Carex nigra ( Black Blooming Sedge Grass )
A perennial clumper, reaching up to 1.5 feet, that is native to marshes and bogs along the east coast of the U.S. Looks great in the rock garden.
The foliage is blue-green.
Hardy zones 4 to 8

Carex ornithopoda 'Variegata' ( Variegated Bird's-Foot Sedge )
A miniature Sedge, forming an evergreeen clump, only reaching up to 6 inches x 1 foot.
The green foliage is striped vertically with creamy-white.
Hardy zone 4 to 9 preferring light shade in moist, fertile, light soil.

Carex oshimensis

'Everest'

* photos taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Everillo'

* photo taken on May 4 2014 in Baltimore Co, MD


'Gold Strike'
Forms a dense clump, up to 20 inches x 2 feet, with golden variegated foliage.
Hardy zones 5 to 9, in sun or partial shade. 'Everest' is similar with deep green leaves that are boldly white margined.

Carex pansa ( California Meadow Sedge )
Also called Dune Sedge. An excellent, evergreen turfgrass substitute, reaching just 4 inches x 1.5 feet ( unmowed height ) and spreading but not aggressively by rhizomes. It is native to western North America ( from British Columbia to California ). It can be mowed however is rarely needed though mowing 2 or 3 times yearly does tend to make it grow thicker and neater. This deep-rooted, turf-like plant, thriving especially well in coastal parts of central California; makes an excellent base plant for a natural meadow. While it may eventually spread to 3 feet across from a single plug, it should be planted much closer together when used as groundcover.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 in full sun to partial shade on sand to very well drained soil. While it may go dormant during summer drought, it doesn't take any more than 2 or 3 deep waterings per month to keep it lush and deep green.

* interesting link on Carex pansa http://www.baynatives.com/plants/Carex-pansa/
http://drystonegarden.com/index.php/2011/10/carex-pansa/

Carex pendula ( Drooping Sedge )
Forms a slow growing, long-lived, arching clump reaching a maximum size of 4 x 6.5 feet, with broad, semi-evergreen ( evergreen in mild climates ) deep green foliage. A very graceful plant that looks great next to the waters edge. It is native to most of Europe south of the boreal forest region.
The unique, long arching flower spikes reach up to 7.6 ( rarely over 5 ) feet in height.
The interesting drooping seed heads can be used in flower arrangements.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 preferring partial to full shade on moist, fertile soil. Cut back during early spring before new growth begins.

* photos taken on Mar 8 2013 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD
* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Carex pennsylvanica ( Pennsylvania Sedge )
Also called Oak Sedge. Forms a fast-spreading clump up to 16 inches x 2 feet and can be used in mass plantings for groundcover where it will form dense mats on the shady sites that it prefers. It can spread up to 8 inches yearly on ideal sites
It is native to moist woods and oak savannah of eastern North America ( Quebec to Manitoba south to Arkansas to Mississippi and Georgia ) and is of high wildlife value.
The fine-textured, narrow ( up to 12 x 0.15 inches ), semi-evergreen foliage is glossy bright green later turning to deep green. Durign cold winter weather, the foliage may turn to tan-brown.
Pennsylvania Sedge is among the first Sedges to bloom during spring, bearing whitish plumes. Hardy zones 3 to 8 prefering acidic soils and shade ( even tolerating dense shade under Oaks ). It can be mowed to as low as 2.5 inches 1 to 3 times a year and makes an excellent lawn substitute in the shade. Plant 1 foot apart to create a "woodland lawn". Keep moist during the first season, they become very tough and drought tolerant after that ( however still looks best with a weekly or biweekly deep watering ). Clumps can be divided during early spring.
* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Oct 17 2013 in Olney, MD

* photos taken on Oct 19 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 11 2014 in Washington, DC

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Carex phyllocephala ( Japanese Palm Sedge )
A Japanese native, forming a rhizomatous spreading, dense clump, up to 2 x 2 feet in size. The straited, sword shaped, evergreen leaves, up to 10 x 0.5 inches in size, are green.
The stems are "Palm-like" with the foliage whorled towards the stem tips.
The flowers are not very conspicuous.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in partial to full shade on moist, fertile soil.

* photos taken on Aug 15 2014 at Maryland Zoo, Baltimore, MD


'Sparkler'
Reaches a maximum height of 3 feet, with foliage that is deep green with irregular vertical white stripes and a bold white border. Very exotic in appearance, looking almost like a miniature Bamboo.
Very shade tolerant. Propagation from seed usually results in all green plants.

Carex plantaginea ( Plantain Sedge )
A very ornamental, moderate growing, rhizomatous, dense clump ( maximum size 2 x 3 feet ) forming perennial plant native to eastern North America.
The straited lance-shaped, evergreen leaves, up to 24 x 1.5 inches in size, are glossy deep green.
If is an excellent evergreen groundcover for shady sites, even for climates colder than where the Japanese Sedges will grow.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 preferring partial shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil. Even tolerating dry shade. Propagate by means of division during early spring.

* photos taken on March 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum



* photos taken on Oct 17 2013 in Olney, MD

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Mountain Yodel'
Reaches up to 2 feet with broad, glossy, evergreen foliage.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

Carex platyphylla ( Broadleafed Silver Sedge )
Native to woodland understories from Maine to Alabama; it forms a clump, up to 8 inches x 1 foot, of powdery-blue leaves up to an inch across.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on moderately dry to moist soil.

* photos taken on Oct 19 2013 in Columbia, MD


Carex riparia ( Greater Pond Sedge )
A fast growing, perennial grass, reaching up to 4.3 x 6 feet, that is a widespread native across Eurasia. It may be invasive unless planted in a pot to contain it.
The narrow leaves are up to 5.3 feet x 0.3 inches.
The showy deep reddish-brown flowers are borne on stalks up to 3.3 feet high.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist or wet soil to up to 18 inches deep in fresh water.

'Variegata' ( Variegated Greater Pond Sedge )
Foliage reaches up to 2 feet in height and is boldly center striped white and bordered deep green. It makes a very attractive plant for garden ponds or the waters edge.

Carex siderosticha
Forming a fast rhizomatous spreading, long lived, dense clump, up to 1 x 2 feet , with straited, deep green, sword-shaped leaves, up to 24 x 1 inches. The foliage turns rich golden-yellow during autumn after frosts.
Rarely seen, this forms an excellent woodland groundcover ( mix with Hostas and Ferns ).
Hardy zones 4 to 9 ( zone 3 with reliable snowfall ) preferring partial to full shade on moist, fertile, well drained soil. This Sedge enjoys climates with hot humid summers and is native to woodlands of eastern Asia. Cut back during early winter. Propagation is from division during early spring.
* photos of unknown internet source


* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Banana Boat'
Forms a dense clump up to 1 x 2 feet, with very attractive, tropical-looking foliage that is intense golden-yellow with a narrow mid-green border and a narrow green longitudinal stripes. The leaves are up to 1 inch in width.
This is an excellent substitite for Japanese Forest Grass. It is great in containers and can be used in dry shade.

'Island Brocade'
A very attractive semi-evergreen to evergreen clump forming perennial, that is moderate growing ( spreading up to 1 foot per year ). It is an excellent plant to brighten up a dark corner and mixes well with Hostas, Helleboris and Epimedium.
The arching, wide leaf blades, up to 18 x 2 inches, are green with bold creamy-yellow stripes in the leaves.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in partial to full shade.

* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Lemon Zest'
Foliage is bright yellow.

* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Surf's Up'
The deep green foliage is boldly longitudinally striped white.

Carex stricta ( Tussock Sedge )
A moderate growing, rhizome spreading, clumping Sedge, reaching up to 3.5 ( rarely over 2.5 ) feet in height, that is native to wet boggy sites and tidal marshes but can tolerate temporary drought. It is native to eastern North America ( from Minnesota to Quebec to Nova Scotia; south to Iowa to Tennessee to North Carolina ).
The arching, bright green, fountain-like foliage is borne in dense tussocks.
The attractive foliage turns to light tan color during the winter.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on fertile, moist soil. Cut back in early spring to make room for new growth.

'Bowles Golden'
A short lived, clumping perennial, reaching a maximum size of 3 feet x 20 inches. The foliage is golden-yellow at first, turning to bright green late in the summer.

Carex sylvatica ( Wood Sedge )
An attractive, evergreen, woodland groundcover that is native to Eurasia.
It has deep green, V-shaped leaf blades, up to 40 x 0.5 inches in length ( usually much shorter ).
Hardy zones 3 to 8; it thrives in sun or shade and is tolerant of clay.

Carex testacea ( Orange New Zealand Sedge )
Forms a clump, up to 3 x 2.5 feet, with fine-textured, orange-tinted foliage.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( tolerating 0 F )

'Prairie Fire'
Reaches up to 2 x 2 feet.

* photo taken on Aug 15 2011 in Howard Co, MD

* photo taken on July 1 2014 in Columbia, MD


Carex texanensis ( Catlin Sedge )
A rhizomatous perennial grass, reaching up to 1 x 2.5 ( rarely over 0.5 in height ) feet, with fine textured, very narrow mid-green foliage. It is a widespread native over the eastern U.S. from Oklahoma to New York; south to Texas to Georgia. It is generally found on savannahs and open oak woodlands ( esp Post Oak ) in the wild. Catlin Sedge is very attractive and makes a great lawn substitute. It also looks great between large boulders, where its fine textured foliage provides great contrast. It can be moved occasionally on a high setting, especially during early spring before the new growth begins. It is evergreen in the south, semi-evergreen to deciduous north of zone 7.
Hardy zones 5 to 9, preferring partial shade though tolerating full sun or deeper shade. It prefers sandy, well drained soil. It can grow on moist or dry sites and is clay tolerant. It is deer resistant. Catlin Sedge is grown from seed or root division.

Carex tumulicola ( Berkeley Sedge )
A very tough yet decorative evergreen clumping grass, reaching up to 2 x 1.5 feet in height, that is native to northern California. It is great used as a specimen or for mass groundcover plantings. The foliage is deep green.
Hardy zones 8 to 10 in sun or shade, tolerating even dense tree roots.

Carex virgata
Forms a fast growing, upright, evergreen clump, up to 3 x 3 feet.
The narrow foliage is bright green.
Hardy zones 6a+, very tough and easy to grow.

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