Sunday, January 17, 2010

Junipers for all Landscapes

A genus of close to 60 evergreen trees and shrubs that are part of the larger Cupressacae family. Junipers are very long lived and while the larger ones have valuable lumber, nearly all Junipers are valued for their ability to grow well in climates. In fact Junipers are the most drought tolerant genus of Conifers.
Most have aromatic foliage and plants are typically either male or female flowering.
Junipers have 2 types of foliage ( sometimes both on the same tree ). The "juvenile foliage" type is prickly and needle like; the "adult foliage" is scale-like resembling that of the Cypress.
Most Junipers require full sun and well drained soil! Junipers are very lime tolerant. Plants planted on sites that are not open and airy may suffer fungal attack. Very often fungal attack can be prevented by pruning out inner dead wood to encourage air flow.
Columnar and pyramidal tree forms should always be pruned to a single main leader to prevent splitting in ice and heavy snowstorms.
Juniper can be pruned lightly to shape however shearing usually destroys the natural shape and shortens the life of the plant. Cutting in to old and bare inner wood should be prevented since it often does not regrow. Junipers come in all shapes and sizes, it is better to buy one that stays small rather than plant one that grows huge and hack the hell out of it. I see this all the time and it is among the most annoying of all landscape (mis)practices. If you plant a Prifzer Juniper as a foundation shrub - you will not be able to see out the front of your house in 20 years period!!! That being said Junipers are an extremely variable group of plants and many extremely beautiful examples abound, especially in the wilds of the west.
Propagation can be from late fall or winter cuttings with a heel of older wood or from terminal growth cuttings during the summer for the cultivars. The species can be grown from fresh seed after a soaking in sulfuric acid.
Junipers can be prone to scale, spider mites and bagworm. Juniperus virginiana is prone to Cedar Apple Rust which causes gall like growths to infest the younger branch stems.
The foliage of Juniper can be used to make a Tea which is rich in Vitamin C. The berries can also be used fresh to make Tea which may taste inferior to Tea made from the foliage. Juniper Berries are also the main ingredient in Gin.
Juniper wood is excellent for firewood and being highly rot resistant, it also makes excellent fenceposts lasting for 50 years or more.

* photo of unknown internet source

* historical archive photos



Juniperus ashei ( Ashe Juniper )
A fast growing medium size tree native from northern Texas to southern Missouri; south to southwest Texas to central Texas. Ashe Juniper is the most common Juniper in Texas. It reaches around 50 feet and has large scaffold branches that form a wide spreading crown. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; largest on record - 90 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet. It is similar to Juniperus occidentalis but occurs naturally further east.
The scale-like foliage is deep green.
The shaggy warm brown bark is in long strips. The timber is valuable for fenceposts.
Hardy zones 6 to 9, it is very drought tolerant. Unfortunately rare in cultivation.
Very lime tolerant and is typically occurs on limestone bluffs in the wild in its native range.

Juniperus barbadensis ( Caribbean Juniper )
Similar to Juniperus bermudiana but is native to Cuba, Jamaica, Hispanolia, St Lucia, the Barbados and the Bahamas. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 70 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet. This Juniperus virginiana relative is critically endangered. It is now extinct in the Barbados, it was once common on St Lucia but due to overharvesting and forest clearing, is now reduced to just 50 trees. The wood is highly valued however too few of these trees remain for harvesting.
The foliage is deep green.
Hardy zones 10 to 12.

Juniperus bermudiana ( Bermuda Cedar )
A sturdy trunked medium size tree native to Bermuda where it was once common.
It is similar to but wider and stockier than Juniperus virginiana in appearance.
The only native tree of the island of Bermuda it is now endangered with extinction in its native range. From 1944 to 1952 96% of Juniper on Bermuda died from the introduced Juniper Oyster Shell Scale, by 1978 99% had died. The remaining 1 % has moderate to good resistance to Juniper Oyster Shell Scale and is being used to repopulate the species. The original Bermudian Forests of Bermuda Cedar were extremely beautiful and the timber was highly valuable for many purposes. The wood even repels moths and mildew, making it even more valuable for using to line closets and drawers. The wood is also very rot resistant making it even more valuable. Restoring this tree is of very high importance to Bermuda's natural heritage, wildlife habitat and also economy due to its timber products.
A tree of moderate growth rate; Some records include: 22 years - 45 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 inches; 31 years - 56 feet; largest on record - 72 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet. It has almost reached that height in less than a century in Cork Ireland far outside its native range.
The overlapping scale like leaves are arranged in 4 ranks on 4-sided branchlets.
The branches are much divided and the bark is deep red.
Hardy zones 8 to 10. It is easy to grow from seed and is very drought tolerant as well as being tolerant of wet and alkaline soil. It is also moderately salt tolerant.

* photos of unknown internet source

* historical archive photos



* video found on youtube


Juniperus blancoi
A very rare tree native to mountains of northwestern Mexico that is similar to Juniperus scopulorum but only reaches a maximum size of 50 feet. It has become critically endangered and continues to decline in its now highly fragmented natural range in Sonora, Chihuahua and Durango States. It typically forms an attractive rounded, small tree.
The attractive gray-green foliage is borne on drooping branchlets.
The deep blue-black berries are up to 0.3 x 0.4 inches in size.
The reddish-brown bark turns gray and also rough and exfoliating on older trees.
Hardy zones 8 to 9 in full sun on just about any well drained soil. It is extremely heat and drought tolerant.

Juniperus brevifolia ( Azores Juniper )
A sturdy trunked small tree native to the Azores Islands ( where endangered ) that is very similar to Juniperus oxycedrus but having prickly blue-green foliage that is shorter. Some records include: largest on record - 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 inches
The dark reddish-brown cones are also smaller.
Hardy zones 8 to 10

* photo of unknown internet source


Juniperus californica ( California Juniper )
A small tree reaching around 40 feet that is native to Oregon and California; east to southern Nevada and western Arizona. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 46 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.2 feet.
The scale-like foliage is light-green and arranged in 3s.
The reddish-brown berries have a whitish bloom.
The bark is red-brown.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 it is very drought tolerant and tolerates annual precip as low as 12 inches. The California Juniper is very alkaline soil tolerant and actually prefers a soil PH of 7 to 8. California Juniper is becoming a popular for bonsai; it is also valued for its heat and drought tolerance as a garden plant for dry areas.

* photo taken by VTM Project and the Marian Koshland Bioscience and Natural Resources Library




Juniperus cedrus ( Canary Island Juniper )
A very beautiful, graceful, fast growing, medium size tree with slender drooping branchlets. It is native to the Canary Islands where it is now endangered with extinction. Some records include: 10 years - 12 x 6 feet; 40 years - 50 feet; largest on record - 150 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The dense, sharp pointed awl-shaped juvenile foliage nearly an inch long is arranged in whorls of 3. The foliage is blue-green.
The small, rounded fruits are reddish-brown with a whitish bloom.
Hardy zones 7 to 10b. An excellent landscape tree in New Zealand and parts of central California and the far southern British Isles.

* excellent link
http://conifersociety.org/conifers/conifer/juniperus/cedrus/

Juniperus chinensis ( Chinese Juniper )
A native of Mongolia, most of China, Korea and Japan; this very large columnar to pyramidal arboreal Juniper can reach 60 feet or more. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 4 years - 10 feet; 20 years - 36 x 10 feet; 700 years - trunk diameter of 11 feet; largest on record - 117 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 22.5 ( very rare over 9 ) feet; largest in Maryland - 70 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet in Calvert Co. Extremely long-lived, it is known to survive for as long as 1500 years.
It has dark green foliage typically adult scale like however often with pricky juvenile foliage mixed in on some of the lower branches.
The small rounded berries are blue-green.
The attractive red-brown bark peels in strips.
The Chinese Junipers grows best on light well drained loamy soil and grows well in hot summers.
Hardy zones 3 to 9, it thrives at least as far north as the Ottawa River in Ontario. It is recommended to prune to a single leader when young since multiple leaders often split with age. As the tree ages branches killed off by low light levels ( often the lower ones ) should be removed to show off the bark. Drought tolerant.

* photo taken on Feb 2009 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


* excellent photo link
https://www.flickr.com/photos/leighadactyl/2257436817/

* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD

* photos taken Aug 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario

* photo taken on Aug 14 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken by J.G. Jack @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* video found on youtube


'Ames'
A dense, broadly-pyramidal small tree reaching up to 10 x 4 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 25 x 15 feet. It makes a great windbreak or screen.
The needle-like foliage is bluish-green.
The abundant berries make it a great choice for attracting wildlife.
Hardy zones 4 to 9, it has proven fully hardy at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.

'Aurea' ( Golden Chinese Juniper )
Slow growing ( 20 x 4 feet in 20 years; largest on record - 70 x 17 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet ). This dense, columnar to pyramidal Juniper has bright gold foliage.


* photo taken on Sep 3 2017 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


'Blue Point'
Fast growing and densely broad-pyramidal in habit, reaching a maximum size of 33 x 16 feet. Some records include: 5 years - 12 x 4 feet; 10 years - 15 x 5 feet; 20 years - 30 x 10 feet. It is great for screening.
The prickly foliage is bright blue-green.
Hardy zones 4 to 9, it is exceptionally drought and wind tolerant.

* photo taken on Sep 23 2013 in Burtonsville, MD

* photo taken on Sep 9 2014 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


* photo taken on Oct 3 2015 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken on Sep 1 2017 in Howard Co., MD


'Columnaris Glauca'
Nearly identical to 'Hetzii Columnaris', except for having blue-green foliage.

'Hetzii Columnaris'
Also called Juniperus chinensis 'Fairview'. A fast growing, dense, columnar tree, reaching an eventually maximum size of 66 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 23 x 3.3 feet; 25 years - 33 x 11 feet. It makes a great windbreak or screen.
The attractive, fine-textured, scaly adult foliage is luxuriant mid-green.
This female clone produces abundant berry-cones.
Hardy zones 3 to 9.

* photo taken on Aug 15 2014 @ Rawlings Conservatory, Baltimore, MD

* photo taken on Jan 2009 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC



'Hetzi Glauca'
An extremely hardy, very fast growing, upright-rounded to eventually spreading form, reaching a maximum size of 17 x 33 ( averaging half ) feet. Recommended for the northern Great Plains esp. Alberta where selection of hardy evergreen landscape shrubs is limited. Some records include: 3 years - 2 feet x 50 inches; 10 years - 6.5 x 6.5 feet. The attractive, fine-textured, scale-like adult foliage is bright blue to blue-green.
This is a female clone that produces berries.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

'Hooks'
A fast growing, pyramidal to eventually broadly-pyramidal tree, reaching 20 + feet in 20 years, eventually much more. Its twisted branches give it great character. This tree is great for screening.
The soft-textured, scale-like, adult foliage is luxuriant deep green.
The berries are great for attracting birds to the garden.
Hardy zones 4 to 9.

'Iowa'
An attractive, moderate growing, dense, upright-pyramidal in habit, eventually becoming a small tree, reaching a maximum size of 33 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 inches. Some records include: 10 years - 10 x 4 feet; 20 years - 15 x 10 feet.
The attractive, fine-textured, adult foliage is blue-green, eventually turning to gray-green.
It bears abundant, large blue berries.
Hardy zones 4 to 9, it has proven fully hardy at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.

* photo taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.


'Kaizuka' ( Hollywood Juniper )
The Hollywood Juniper grows as a large architectural shrub or can be trained as a tree. It has a moderate growth rate to 2 ( rarely 3 ) feet per year and can reach up to 20 x 7 feet in 10 years. With extreme age it can grow quite large and is known up to 66 x 52 feet with a trunk diameter up to 4 feet across. They become very massive in habit with spreading twisted branches densely clustered with scale-like, lush mid green leaves.
This is a female clone abundantly bearing silvery berry-cones.
The reddish cypress-like bark is also an ornamental feature.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun. Very salt tolerant.














* photos taken on Mar 7 2013 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on Sep 30 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC



* photos taken on Mar 18 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD



'Kaizuka Variegata'
Very similar to 'Kaizuka' except slower growing, more erect and having foliage with cream blotches.

* photo taken on Aug 14 2014 in Columbia, MD


'Keteleeri'
A vigorous, dense, broadly-pyramidal tree, reaching a maximum size of 60 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 20 years - 20 x 6 feet. This tree is highly valuable for screening and windbreaks. The often naturally twisted branchlets on older trees gives it extra visual appeal. The attractive, fine-textured, scale-like adult foliage is luxuriant deep green. It abundantly bears blue-green fruits giving it excellent wildlife value.
Hardy zones 4 to 9. This blight and cedar-apple rust resistant juniper is a great replacement for Juniperus virginiana in areas where this can be a problem.


* photo taken on Dec 15 2012 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on Feb 5 2013 in Columbia, MD


'Mac's Golden'
A moderate growing, dense-pyramidal form, reaching up to 15 x 6 feet in 10 years with an eventual maximum size of 60 x 20 feet. This Juniper is highly valuable for screening.
The fine-textured foliage is golden-yellow at first, later turning to blue-green. The colorful new growth continues throughout the summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 9. Resistant to cedar-apple rust.

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Maney'
A moderate growing, multi-stemmed, bushy, upright, arching large shrub, reaching a maximum size of 17 x 17 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 6.6 x 13 feet. It makes a great barrier plant or low windbreak.
The attractive, fine-textured, scale-like foliage is powdery-blue to blue-green. The foliage keeps it's color well during winter.
It's abundant berry production makes it valuable to wildlife.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, it is exceptionally salt and wind tolerant.

* photo taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario


'Mountbatten'
A fast growing, dense, upright-pyramidal tree, reaching up to 13 x 10 feet in 10 years and a maximum size of 20 x 15 feet. It makes a great screen or windbreak.
The needle-like foliage is bright green at first, turning to gray-green, then finally to purplish-bronze during winter.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

'Obelisk' ( Obelisk Juniper )
A slow growing, irregularly branched, upright columnar tree, that eventually becomes more wide-spreading and broad-pyramidal. It can reach up to 10 x 6.6 feet in 10 years with an eventual maximum size of 30 x 23 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet ).
The dense, prickly foliage is deep blue-green. The needles are up to 0.6 inches in length.
Its berries give it added wildlife value.
Hardy zones 3 to 9, it is exceptionally salt, wind and drought tolerant.

* photo taken on Jan 2009 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON


'Olympia'
A moderate growing, upright, pyramidal, small tree, reaching up to 12 x 8 feet in 10 years, eventually to 30 x 15 feet in size. The branchlets are often twisted and curved giving it added ornamental value. It makes a great screen or windbreak.
The finely-textured, adult foliage is blue-green.
The abundant berries make this a great tree for attracting birds.

'Pyramidalis'
A dense, upright, pyramidal, small tree reaching up to 10 x 4 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 17 x 6.6 feet. Unlike most other tree form Juniperus chinensis cultivars; this one is not very sturdy and often breaks apart during heavy snow / ice storms long before it ever reaches maturity. For this reason, it is no longer commonly used in landscaping.
The sharp prickly foliage is very bright blue-green.

'Robusta Green'
An attractive, moderate growing, dense, upright, broad-columnar form with artistically twisted branches. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 16 x 8 feet; largest on record - 25 x 15 x 1 feet. It can be used as both bonsai and screen, looks great against white stucco walls and compliments Spanish and Italian architecture well, esp. along gated entrances.
The foliage is gray-green. This form bears both juvenile ( needle-like ) and adult ( scale-like ) foliage.
This female clone bears very abundant, grayish-white berry-cones.
Hardy zones 4 to 9.

* photo taken on August 4 2010 in Clinton, Ontario

* photo taken on Apr 11 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON


'Rosefield's Perfect'
Also called 'Perfecta'. A moderate growing, very dense, narrowly-upright form, reaching up to 15 x 4 feet in size. It makes a great formal plant with very little pruning required.
The finely-textured, scale-like foliage is luxuriant deep green.
The abundant berry production makes this a valuable plant for attracting birds.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'San Jose'
A dense, prostrate, groundcover shrub, reaching a maximum size of 2 x 10 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 2 x 6.6 feet.
The mostly-juvenile, spiny, awl-shaped foliage is gray-green to blue-green.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

'Sheppardii' ( Sheppard Chinese Juniper )
A very attractive, moderate growing, upright, broadly-pyramidal to eventually rounded, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 43 x 29 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet. Extremely rare in cultivation, it deserves much wider use. Some places it can be seen include the Morton Arboretum in Illinois and the U.S. National Arboretum in Washington, DC.
The fine-textured, scale-like foliage is luxuriant mid-green.



'Shimpaku'
A moderate growing, dwarf, vase-shaped to spreading form, reaching up to 4 x 6 feet in 10 years, eventually up to 5 x 8 feet in size. The layering effect of its branching habit makes it a popular choice for bonsais. The soft, gray-green to dull green foliage is borne in bunches, resembling that of the much larger Juniperus chinensis 'Torulosa'.
Hardy zones 3 to 9.

'Shoosmith'
Moderate growing, irregular branched, broad-conical in habit, reaching up to 8 x 4 feet in 10 years and eventually up to 15 x 6 feet.
The sharp, needle-like juvenile foliage is bright green. The scale-like adult foliage is deep green. The 2-toned foliage gives this small tree and interesting effect.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

'Spartan'
A fast growing, dense, columnar, medium-sized tree. It can reach a maximum size of 50 x 8 feet through after a century much larger, even up to 82 feet is possible. Some records include: 10 years - 20 x 5 feet; 20 years - 27 x 6 feet.
The soft-textured, scale-like, adult foliage is rich green.
The abundant blue berries are of value for attracting wildlife.
Hardy zones 4 to 9, it is very salt as well as heat, drought and wind tolerant making it a great screen for along roadways. It has proven fully hardy at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.

* photo taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario


'Stricta'
A slow growing, compact, columnar to conical ( eventually broad upright-oval ), small tree. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 20 years - 20 x 4 feet; largest on record - 33 x 15 feet.
The prickly, needle-like, juvenile foliage is silvery-blue, turning to steel-blue during winter.
Hardy zones 3 to 9

'Stricta Variegata'
A slow growing conical shrub with blue-green foliage on long branches that is splashed cream. Foliage is prickly on young trees later becoming scale-like. It can reach up to 5 x 3.3 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 13 x 5 feet.

* photo taken on Apr 18 2017 in Pikesville, MD

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


Juniperus communis ( Common Juniper )
A very variable, moderate growing shrub or small tree that is native to Eurasia including central & northern Europe, the mountains of the Mediterranean and the British Isles. It is also native to North America ( from northern Alaska to northern Yukon to southern Nunavut to far northern Ontario to all of Labrador and Newfoundland; south into the U.S. Rockies to South Dakota to Michigan to Massachussetts ). It is also found very locally in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina and is considered endangered in those states. It was locally common on the west shore of Point Pelee and the southern tip of Pelee Island before 1900; however otherwise has always been rare in the Windsor/Essex County region. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 13 x 6.6 feet; largest on record - 80 x 15 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet; largest in U.S. - a tree of 60 x 15 x 1 foot is recorded to have grown in Washtenaw Co, MI; longest lived - 1013 years. It is typically shorter and more spreading in cold climates and more columnar in warm climates.
The aromatic, always juvenile prickly needle-like foliage up to 0.7 inches is silver backed.
The foliage is arranged in whorls of 3, is deep green above and whitish beneath.
The fruits up to 0.2 inches ripen to shiny blue to black with a whitish bloom and are processed to make Gin.
The red-brown bark peels in thin vertical strips.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 ( likely 1 for northeast Alberta seed source ) and is extremely adaptable. Very drought, pollution, clay and alkaline soil tolerant. It is also moderately salt tolerant. The Common Juniper prefers cool summers and is unfortunately prone to Juniper Blight in regions with hot humid summers. Deer resistant, there are few better plants for inviting birds to the winter landscape, for both shelter and the tasty berry-cones.

* photo taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario

* photo taken on July 30 2013 @ Grand Bend, Ontario

* photos taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON

* photos taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* historical archive photos





USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


* video found on youtube


'Blueberry Delight'
A moderate growing, dense, low-spreading form, reaching up to 4 x 8 feet. Some records include: 10 years - 1 x 5 feet.
The needle-like foliage is deep green above, silvery-blue beneath. It retains its color very well during the winter.
This is a female form that produces abundant blue berry-cones.
Hardy zones 2 to 7. It is recommended on the Great Plains and Midwestern North America.

'Compressa'
A slow growing, very dense, dwarf column. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 inches; 20 years - 5.5 feet x 8 inches; largest on record - 8 feet.
The juvenile foliage is tiny and deep green.

* historic archive photo


'Depressa Aurea'
A fast growing, dense, wide-spreading, groundcover shrub, reaching up to 2 x 8.5 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 4 x 20 feet.
The bright yellow young foliage later turns to green then to bronze during winter.

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Depressed Star'
A spreading to rounded shrub, reaching up to 2 x 5 feet in 10 years, with an eventual maximum size of 5 x 17 feet.
The feathery foliage is bright green, turning to bronze during winter.

'Effusa'
Reaches up to 15 inches x 6 feet in 10 years, eventually up to 10 feet wide.
The soft foliage is mid-green, turning to yellowish-green during winter.

'Gold Cone'
A columnar, upright form reaching up to 6 x 3 feet in 10 years, with an eventual maximum size of 16 x 4 feet. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 8 inches.
The golden-yellow new growth deepens to blue-green by winter.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


* photos taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC



'Golden Schnapps'
Upright and conical, reaching up to 6 x 3 feet in 10 years, eventually up to 8 x 6 feet.
The foliage is golden-yellow at first, before aging to bright green. The tough foliage rarely burns in the sun.

'Green Carpet'
A spreading, low growing groundcover shrub. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 1 x 4.3 feet; largest on record - 1 x 16 feet.
The needle-like foliage is bright green at first, turning to deep green.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


'Hibernica ( Irish Juniper )
Also called Juniperus communis 'Stricta'. A dense columnar tree. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10 inches; 8 years - 7.7 x 2 feet ( avg ); 20 years - 37 x 3.3 feet; largest on record - 60 x 5.5 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet.
The aromatic, needle-like foliage is deep blue-green.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery

* photos taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


* historical archive photo


'Hornibrookii'
A mat forming shrub, reaching up to 1 x 6 feet in 10 years with an eventual maximum size of 2.8 x 13 feet.
The foliage is silvery-green.

'Horstmann'
A spectacular weeping form, that can reach up to 10 x 10 feet in 10 years if it is staked for height.
The foliage is blue-green.

var 'Montana' ( Siberian Juniper )
May be same as Juniperus sibirica & J. communis var saxatilis. It is a spreading, low-growing shrub, reaching a maximum height of 2.2 feet; that is native from Siberia to Kamchatka; south to Mongolia, Xizang Province in China to far northeast China, Korea and Japan. It is also found in parts of Europe including high elevations in the Balkans.

* photos taken on Apr 11 2015 in Elkridge, MD



'Nana'
Slow growing ( up to 2 inches x 3 feet in 10 years ) speading groundcover shrub forming a mat of deep green foliage. Excellent for covering coastal cliffs and embankments.

'Oblonga Pendula'
Gracefully drooping in habit, reaching up to 8 x 4 feet in 10 years, eventually reaching up to 20 x 25 feet or more.
The sharp needle-like foliage is blue-green, turning to orangish-bronze during winter.
Hardy zones 2 to 6, tolerating as low as -45 F.

* photos taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore, PA



'Pendula'
A wide spreading shrub with graceful weeping branches. may be similar in habit to Weeping Atlas Cedar. If staked, it can reach up to 6.2 feet in height in 10 years.

'Prostrata'
Very vigorous, attractive groundcover with bright green foliage, reaching a maximum size of 1 x 20 feet. Some records include: 10 years - 1 x 7 feet.

'Repanda'
A dense mounding shrub, reaching up to 1 x 8 feet in 10 years. Some records include: largest on record - 2.3 x 10 feet.
The foliage is deep green.

'Sentinel'
Dense and narrow-columnar in habit, reaching up to 6 x 1 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 10 feet x 28 inches.
The needle-like foliage is silvery-green.

'Suecica' ( Swedish Juniper )
Similar to 'Hibernica' but the branches droop at the tips and the foliage is bluish-green.

'Suecica Nana'
Faster growing and rounder headed than the similar 'Compressa', reaching up to 5 x 1 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 10 x 2 feet.

Juniperus conferta ( Shore Juniper )
A fast growing low wide spreading groundcover Juniper that is native to sandy shoreline areas in Japan and Sakhalin. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 6 years - x 10 feet; 10 years - 1 x 14 feet; largest on record - 2 x 27 feet. It is excellent for use along the sea coast as well as on embankments.
The dense, very prickly needle-like foliage is light green to blue-green.
The needles are up to 0.6 inches in length.
The abundant berries up to 0.5 inches are silvery-green ripening to black.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 ( 3 & 4 possible on clones originating from Sakhalin ) on soil that is very well drained to sandy. It is very tolerant of heat as well as salt laden sea winds.
In the Mid Atlantic I have seen many plantings of these die from Juniper Blight and therefore only use them sporadically ( either diversify or use blight resistant Junipers instead ). It is better loosing one plant than a hundred since mass plantings usually increase the spread of blight.
Propagation is from cuttings taken after the first fall frost ( rooted under mist at 8000 ppm IBA in perlite ). The cuttings should include current years growth with just a little bit of second year wood.

* photo taken on 4th of July 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on July 10 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 3 2013 in Ellicott City, MD

* historic archive photo

* historic archive photo


'Blue Lagoon'
Low growing, dense and more compact than species, reaching up to 6 inches in height and spreading at a rate of up to 10 inches per year.
The blue-green foliage turns plum purple during winter.
Hardy zones 6 to 8
Extremely tolerant of drought and salt.

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Blue Pacific'
Blue-green foliage. Similar to the species, except for shorter denser foliage that keeps its color better during winter.

* photos taken on Dec 8 2011 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on July 5 2016 in Elkridge, MD



'Emerald Seashore'
Foliage is emerald green turning to yellow-green in winter.
Very salt tolerant and considered to be the most cold hardy form.

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.

* photo taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD


'Silver Mist'
Similar to 'Blue Mist' except for having foliage that is intensely silvery-blue at first, later turning to blue-green. The foliage turns purplish during winter.

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC


'Sunsplash'
Foliage is green variegated with golden-yellow.

Juniperus convallium ( Mekong Juniper )
Also called Juniperus mekongensis. An extremely rare, very attractive, dense, narrow tree that reaches a maximum size of 65 ( rarely over 40 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches. It is native to steppe and coniferous forest in high mountains in eastern Tibet and southwestern China.
The foliage is dull green to intense silvery-green. The foliage on young trees in needle-like, up to 0.3 inches in length. The scale-like adult foliage, up to 0.1 inch long, is borne on branchlets that can be either erect or drooping.
The purplish-black fruits are up to 0.3 x 0.2 inches in size.
The pale gray bark peels in vertical strips.
Hardy zones 7 to 8 in cool maritime climates such as British Columbia or Ireland. It has not been tested in North America.

Juniperus davurica ( Dahurian Juniper )
A very variable shrub that is native to mountains and sand dunes from eastern Russia; south to northeast Mongolia, Manchuria and northern Korea..
It has scale-like foliage ( up to 0.3 inches long ) and gray flaking bark The purplish-blue to deep brown berries are up to 0.3 inches wide..
Hardy zones 4 to 8 ( 2 for seed source from northeast Mongolia ) and is very heat tolerant.

'Expansa'
A moderate growing domed groundcover shrub with sturdy wide spreading branches that eventually mound. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 10 years - 2 x 10 feet; largest on record - 3.5 x 13 feet.
The scale-like sage green foliage is held in dense clustered sprays.

* photo taken on Mar 15 2013 in Columbia, MD


'Expansa Variegata'
A moderate growing groundcover shrub with sturdy wide spreading branches that eventually mound. Some records include: 10 years - 2 x 10 feet; largest on record - 4 x 16 feet.
The scale-like foliage held in dense clustered sprays is rich green and splashed with creamy white.


* photos taken on Mar 8 2013 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC





* photo taken on Mar 18 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


'Parsons'
A fast growing, spreading groundcover shrub, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 10 feet. Some records include: 2 years - x 3 feet; 10 years - 2 x 8 feet.
The light blue foliage is usually scale-like and adult in form, though twigs of needle-like foliage usually occurs scattered throughout the plant.
This is a female form, producing berries; unlike the similar looking J. chinensis 'San Jose'.
It is very heat tolerant, even thriving in most of the southeastern U.S.

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* photo taken on on Aug 23 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 23 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Wash, DC

* photos taken on Apr 26 2015 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Oct 26 2015 in Columbia, MD



Juniperus deppeana ( Alligator Juniper )
A very coarse textured, very dense handsome fast growing medium sized tree reaching around 60 feet that is native from northern Arizona to northern New Mexico and western Texas; south into oak woodlands in the mountains of northern Mexico. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 20 years - 33 x 6.6 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 inches; largest on record - 100 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 feet; longest lived - 1000 years.
The scaly adult foliage ( up to 0.12 inches in length ) is blue-green to silvery-gray.
The berries are up to 0.5 inches across.
The red-brown bark is deeply fissured into small 2 inch long square plates.
The bark on old trees is up to 4 inches thick.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 and prefers cool dry winters and hot dry summers.
Very heat tolerant and also tolerant of drought. It hates humidity.

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database



* historical archive photo

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014





* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.

* historical archive photo


'Amarillo'
Grows straighter and faster ( to 4 feet per year )

'Davis Mt. Weeping'
Semi-weeping and upright oval in habit, reaching up to 50 x 25 feet.
The attractive foliage is powdery bright blue.
Hardy zones 7a to 9.



'McFetter'
A fast growing, columnar tree, reaching up to 10 x 3 feet in 10 years, eventually 20 feet or more. This Leyland Cypress substitute makes an excellent screen.
The very attractive foliage is very intensely powdery bright-blue.
Hardy zones 7a to 9 ( may prove hardy into zone 6 with further testing ).

* photos taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC



'Silver Spires'
A rapid growing narrow columnar tree reaching a maximum size of 70 x 25 feet that is an excellent Leyland Cypress substitute in dry climates. The foliage is bright silver.

'Sperryi'
Branchlets more weeping; otherwise similar to species. This subspecies is native to the Davis Mountains in western Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and northeast Sonora State in Mexico. It is critically endangered in the wild.

Juniperus drupacea ( Syrian Juniper )
A very handsome narrow columnar to pyramidal tree reaching over 50 feet that is similar in appearance to the Italian Cypress and is native to mountain forests in Syria, Greece and southwest Asia. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2.5 feet; 4 years - 10 feet; 20 years - 36 x 10 feet; largest on record - 141 x 10 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.6 feet; largest in England - 63 feet.
The broad, prickly, awl-shaped leaves, up to an inch in length are shiny bright green above and whitish below.
The large rounded berries up to an inch across are green ripening to black-purple with a whitish bloom. The berries are edible.
The orange-brown bark peels in long, thin vertical strips.
Hardy zones 5 to 9

Juniperus excelsa ( Greek Juniper )
A rapid growing, large columnar to conical tree reaching over 50 feet that is native to Caucasus to Iran, the Balkans and Turkey. It is endangered in Russia. Some records include: 4 years - 10 feet; 20 years - 23 x 3.3 feet; largest on record - 100 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 feet; longest lived - 2814 years.
The fine branchlets bear long threadlike sprays of tiny blue-green foliage.
The rounded berries, up to 0.5 inches wide, are green ripening to purple-brown with a white bloom covering.
The brown bark peels off in long strips. The timber is of great value.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( tolerating - 22 F ); large trees do grow in England where it thrives in cultivation. Very drought tolerant, it is known to survive in climates with as little as 8 inches of yearly rainfall.

* photos taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC



'Perkinsii'
Very blue foliage

'Stricta'
Rapid growing and columnar. Retains semi-juvenile foliage.

Juniperus flaccida ( Mexican Weeping Juniper )
Also called Drooping Juniper. A long lived, medium-sized tree native to Brewster County in extreme southwest Texas south into the mountains of northern and central Mexico. Some records include: 10 years - 17 x 10 feet; largest on record - 60 x 55 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet. The broad spreading canopy of weeping branchlets give it a Weeping Willow-like appearance.
The scaly, luxuriant mid-green leaves are up to 0.5 inches in length.
The wax covered berries up to 0.8 inches wide are red-brown.
The red-brown bark is in thin narrow scales.
Hardy north to zone 7 in sun to partial shade. It is both very tolerant of heat and drought. Very rare in cultuvation but makes an excellent landscape tree in the west.

* photo taken by G.B. Sudworth @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photos


Juniperus foetidissima ( Albanian Juniper )
A rare round-topped tree reaching around 66 feet that is native to Turkey, Albania, Macedonia, Caucasus Mountains and the coasts of the Black and Caspian Seas. It is endangered in Russia and Armenia. Young trees are conical, older trees are more spreading. Some records include: 4 years - 10 feet; 20 years - 36 x 10 feet; largest on record - 140 x 10 feet with a trunk diameter of 15.5 feet; longest lived - 1700 years.
The foliage is bright green and the berries are purple. The foliage is needle-like to 0.3 inches on young plants and scale-like on older plants.
The 0.5 inch berries are blue-black with a whitish bloom.
The stringy bark is pale gray.
The shoots are much thicker and the foliage greener than Juniperus excelsa which it often occurs with in the wild.
Hardy zones 8 and 9

Juniperus formosana ( Taiwan Juniper )
A graceful, very pendulous, pyramidal, medium-sized tree native to southern China with branchlets weeping at the tips. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 20 inches; 12 years - 8 feet; 30 years - 31 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; largest on record - 82 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet.
The needle-like leaves, up to 1 inch in length, are borne in whorls of 3. The foliage is very luxuriant deep green.
The fruits are orange to red-brown.
The fibrous, dark brown peels in long strips.
Hardy zones 5 to 10 ( interior Chinese seed source being the hardiest ) in full sun on just about any well drained soil. It becomes drought tolerant once fully established. It enjoys hot humid summers and thrives in the southeastern U.S.

Juniperus gamboana ( Gambo Juniper )
A rounded, small tree, reaching a maximum size of 40 feet, that is native to Chiapas State in southern Mexico and neighboring parts of Guatemala. It is found in juniper-pine-oak mountain woodland in it's natural range where it is critically endangered and continues to decline due to deforestation.
The foliage is yellow-green.
The gray bark is divided into small sqarred plates.
Zones 10 ( estimate...it has not been tested in the U.S. or Europe ).

* excellent photo link
http://www.arkive.org/gambo-juniper/juniperus-gamboana/

Juniperus horizontalis ( Creeping Juniper )
A fast growing, low mat forming shrub native to northern North America ( from Fairbanks, Alaska to far northern Yukon to to southwest Nunavut to far northern Ontario to all of Labrador and Newfoundland; south to Wyoming to Iowa to Massachussetts ). It is endangered in South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois, New York State, New Hampshire and Vermont. Some records include: 10 years - 1 ( rarely 2 ) 2 x 13 feet; largest on record - 2 x 27 feet. It is found on rocky shores, sand dunes or mostly sandy hills where found on the Great Plains.
The needle-like mostly juvenile foliage varies from blue to gray-green often turning purplish in winter.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 ( likely 1 for northeast Alberta seed source ). Tolerant of hot dry sites though can be stressed at over 110 F. Very salt and alkaline soil tolerant and an excellent plant for covering banks.

* historic archive photo

* photos taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Bar Harbor'
A low, mat-forming groundcover shrub. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 10 years - 6 inches x 13 feet; largest on record - 1 x 26 feet.
The blue-green foliage turns purplish during winter.
This is a male clone that does not produce berries.
Very salt tolerant, making it a great choice for commercial sites and parking lot islands.

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Blue Chip'
A low, mat-forming, groundcover shrub. Some record include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 10 years - 1 x 13 feet; largest on record - 1 x 26 feet.
The silvery-blue foliage turns purplish during winter.
It is prone to phormopsis blight on some regions.

* photos taken on May 4 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 12 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* photos taken on Sep 3 2013 in Columbia, MD




* photo taken on July 18 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 14 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 9 2014 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on June 20 2015 in Columbia, MD




'Douglasii' ( Waukeegan Creeping Juniper )
A low spreading form reaching a maximum of 2 feet in height with foliage that is both adult and juvenile on the same plant.
The foliage is blue-green in summer and reddish-purple in fall and winter.

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Icee Blue'
Moderate growing, and dense, low, spreading; reaching just 4 inches x 8 feet in 10 years, eventually slightly more.
The foliage is intense bright silvery-blue.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

* photos taken on Apr 27 2015 in Elkridge, MD



* photo taken on Sep 1 2016 in Glen Burnie, MD

* photo taken on Sep 1 2016 in Glen Burnie, MD




'Lime Glow'
A low, spreading, groundcover shrub, reaching up to 2 x 4 feet in 10 years, eventually to 2 x 7 feet.
The foliage is bright yellow to lime-green at first, later turning to bright green. The foliage turns to pinkish-violet during winter.

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Plumosa' ( Andorrea Juniper )
A flat topped low spreading form with soft plumes of foliage that is blue-green in summer turning purplish during winter. Some records include: 10 years - 2 x 6.6 feet; largest on record - 2 x 16 feet.
Unfortunately it is prone to blight.

'Prince of Wales'
A moderate growing, very low, mat-forming shrub, reaching up to 6 inches x 6 feet in 10 years, eventually up to 8 inches x 10 feet in size.
The feathery juvenile foliage is intense blue-green, turning to plum-purple during winter.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, it is very heat and drought tolerant. It originated in Alberta, Canada.

'Torquoise Spreader'
A vigorous, dense, mat-forming shrub that reaches a maximum size of 1 x 17 feet.
The sharp needle-like foliage is intense blue-green.
Hardy zones 2 to 9, very tolerant of heat and drought

'Wiltonii' ( Blue Rug Juniper )
A dense, extremely low, spreading, groundcover shrub. Some record include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 10 years - 6 inches x 13 feet; largest on record - 1 x 26 feet. Can easily be kept smaller by selectively pruning out long streamers and overlapping branches.
The bright blue foliage that turns plum purple in winter.

* photo taken on Oct 5 2011 in Ellicott City, MD


* photo taken on Feb 16 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Aug 1 2013 in Goderich, Ontario


* photo taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Juniperus komarovii ( Komarov Juniper )
A medium-sized tree reaching up to 66 ( rarely over 40 ) feet that is native to the high mountains in the semi-desert region of southern Gansu, southern Qinghai and northwest Sichuan in north central China. It typically grows with a straight single trunk and has an open irregular canopy with drooping branches. This very beautiful tree resembles some of the best Juniperus virginiana glauca in habit.
The scale-like foliage, up to 0.2 inches in length, is blue-green.
The purplish-black berries are up to 0.5 inches wide.
The bark is light gray to brownish-gray.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 ( very likely much hardier to zone 4 though it has only recently been introduced into horticulture and has not been fully tested ).

* excellent photo links
http://www.conifers.org/cu/ju/komarovii1.jpg
http://www.arkive.org/juniperus/juniperus-komarovii/image-G137670.html
http://www.arkive.org/juniperus/juniperus-komarovii/image-G137671.html
http://www.arkive.org/juniperus/juniperus-komarovii/image-G137672.html
http://www.arkive.org/juniperus/juniperus-komarovii/image-G137673.html
http://www.arkive.org/juniperus/juniperus-komarovii/image-G137669.html


Juniperus x media
The hybrids between Juniperus chinensis & J. sabina.
Foliage is aromatic though not necissarily attractively.
Hardy zones 3 to 10.

* photos taken on June 22 2013 in Columbia, MD



'Angelica Blue'
Similar to 'Pfitzeriana' except lower in habit and with finer-textured bright blue foliage. It is fast growing, reaching up to 4 x 10 feet in 10 years, eventually up to 6 x 20 feet.
Hardy zones 3 to 9.

* photos taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore, PA

* photos taken on Aug 3 2012 in Bayfield, Ontario


* photo taken on Oct 20 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on May 18 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 3 2015 in Catonsville, MD


'Armstrongii'
A compact, spreading to domed shrub, reaching up to up to 3.3 x 4 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 6.6 x 20 feet.
The fine-textured, soft, scale-like foliage is bright gray-green all year.
Hardy zones 3 to 9.

'Blaauw'
A vigorous, dense, vase-shaped shrub, reaching a maximum size of 17 x 10 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 6 x 4 feet.
The feathery sprays of scale-like foliage are grayish-blue.
Hardy zones 4 to 9.

'Blue and Gold'
A vigorous, compact spreading to vase-shaped shrub similar to 'Pfiteriana' in habit but only reaching a maximum of 10 x 10 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 1.5 feet; 20 years - 5 x 10 feet.
The scale-like foliage is soft gray-blue heavily variegated with creamy-yellow.
Hardy zones 3 to 9, heat tolerant, even thriving in all North Carolina.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


'Daub's Frosted'
A very attractive, fast growing, dense, low, spreading form, reaching up to 2 x 5 feet in 10 years, eventually up to 2 x 7 feet.
The foliage is borne on feathery sprays. The brilliant golden-yellow prickly juvenile foliage does not burn in full sun. This new growth contrasts nicely with the blue-green inner foliage.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

'Gold Coast'
A moderate growing, graceful, dense and semi-prostrate, reaching up to 4 x 6.6 feet in 10 years with an eventual maximum size of 6 x 17 feet.
The foliage is borne on feathery sprays. The soft, scale-like, adult foliage is tipped golden-yellow.
Hardy zones 3 to 9.

* photos taken on May 7 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 11 2015 in Elkridge, MD


'Gold Lace'
A fast growing, vase-shaped to spreading shrub, reaching up to 4 x 6 feet in 10 years with an eventual maximum size of 5 x 8 feet.
The soft, scale-like new growth is bright yellow, later deepening to golden-yellow. The new growth contrasts nicely with the deep green inner foliage.
Hardy zones 3 to 9.

'Gold Star'
A spreading, flat-topped shrub, reaching up to 4 x 6 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 6 x 12 feet.
The prickly but feathery foliage is bright golden-yellow at first, contrasting nicely with the blue-green inner foliage.
Hardy zones 4 to 9.

* photo taken on Apr 24 2015 in Elkridge, MD


'Mint Julep'
Very fast growing and spreading in habit, though eventually it tends to increase in height and become more upright and domed in habit. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 6.5 x 8 feet; largest on record - 17 x 17 feet.
The soft-textured, scale-like, adult foliage is rich deep green.
Hardy zones 3 to 9.


* photo taken on Aug 1 2013 in Goderich, Ontario

* photos taken on Aug 15 2014 at Maryland Zoo, Baltimore, MD



* photos taken on Mar 21 2015 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on Apr 1 2016 in Howard Co., MD


'Old Gold'
Dense and spreading to almost vase-shaped in habit, it is a smaller form of 'Pfitzeriana Aurea'. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 3 x 6 feet; largest on record - 7 x 12 ( rarely over 4 x 8 ) feet with a trunk diameter of 10.5 inches.
The soft-textured, scale-like foliage is bright golden-yellow at first, later turning to bright green interior branches.
Hardy zones 4 to 9.

* photo taken on July 18 2012 in Baltimore, MD

* photo taken on Aug 1 2013 in Goderich, Ontario

* photo taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on July 11 2014

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on Nov 27 2015 in Harrisburg, PA

* photo taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Major's Hill Park, Ottawa, ON


'Paul's Gold'
A dense, vase-shaped to spreading shrub that is similar to Juniperus x media 'Pfitzeriana' but smaller. It can reach up to 1.5 x 4 feet in 5 years, with a likely eventual size of 2 x 6 feet or smaller if pruned.
The soft-textured, scale-like foliage is bright golden-yellow.
Extremely hardy, this attractive conifer is great as a foundation plant in the northern Great Plains ( esp. the Canadian Prairies ) where desirable landscape plant choices are limited.

* photo taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario


'Pfitzeriana' ( Pfitzer Juniper )
Fast growing, dense, spreading, massive shrubs with sturdily ascending branches and pendulous tips. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 5 years - 4 x 6 feet; 10 years - 10 x 13 feet; largest on record - 17 x 34 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot.
The leaves are scale-like to awl-shaped and blue-green ( other colors on certain clones ).
Hardy zones 2 to 9.

* photo taken on April 27 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 4 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 9 2015 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Aug 27 2015 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on Sep 2 2015 in Catonsville, MD

* photos taken on Jan 10 2016 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Oct 16 2016 in Columbia, MD




* historical archive photo

* photos of unknown internet source



'Golden Pfitzer' ( Golden Pfitzer Juniper )
Similar to 'Pfitzeriana' except for golden-yellow new foliage that later turns to deep yellow-green. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 5 x 8 feet; largest on record - 12 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot ( 6 x 13 feet is about average ).

* photos taken on Aug 15 2014 at Maryland Zoo, Baltimore, MD



* photo taken on Apr 23 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Pfitzeriana Glauca'
The same as 'Pfitzeriana' with bright blue foliage.

* photo taken on Dec 4 2011 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on April 27 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 4 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 18 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 9 2015 in Columbia, MD











* photo taken on Oct 16 2016 in Columbia, MD


'Plumosa Aurea' ( Golden Plume Pfitzer )
This Juniper is spreading with ascending branches that arch at the tips. It reaches up to 3.3 x 8 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 13 x 21 feet. The plum-like sprays of soft needle-like foliage are golden green ( turns to golden-bronze in winter in colder climates ).
Hardy zones 3 to 9.


* photos taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


* photo taken on Sep 3 2017 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


'Saybrook Gold'
Similar to 'Pfitzeriana Aurea' except for having much brighter golden-yellow, soft new growth ( in fact the brightest yellow of any Juniper ).
It is fast growing, reaching up to 5 x 8 feet in 10 years, eventually up to 7 x 22 feet.
Hardy zones 4 to 9.

* photo taken on Apr 24 2015 in Elkridge, MD



'Sea Green'
Similar to 'Mint Julep' but slightly smaller, reaching up to 4 x 5 feet in 5 years with an eventual maximum size of 7 x 8 feet.
The soft-textured, scale-like, adult foliage is rich deep green.
Hardy zones 4 to 9.

* photos taken on Feb 5 2014 in Columbia, MD



* photo taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Major's Hill Park, Ottawa, ON


'Sea Spray'
Dense and prostrate; reaching up to 8 inches x 6.6 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 2 x 13 feet.
The very fine-textured, soft, scale-like foliage is blue-green.
Hardy zones 4 to 9.

Juniperus monosperma ( Cherrystone Juniper )
Also called One-Seed Juniper. A dense rounded medium-size tree native reaching around 30 feet that is native to western North America ( from southwest Utah to north-central Colorado to western Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle; south to the Mexican border from Arizona to western Texas ). Cherrystone Juniper is the most common Juniper in northern New Mexico. It is endangered in Oklahoma. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 20 years - 13 feet ( average ); largest on record - 70 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet; longest lived - 600 years. It typically has a short twisted trunk and a open canopy of thick branches giving it a natural bonsai-like appearance.
The mostly adult, scale-like foliage is gray-green.
The small rounded fruit are gray-green and contain a single seed.
The bark is red-brown and fibrous.
Hardy zones 3 to 9. Moderately heat tolerant and extremely drought tolerant, roots have been found over 200 feet below ground. Prefers soil PH of 7 to 8. Rare in cultivation but makes an excellent landscape plant in the west.

* photo taken by F. H. Miller @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photo


Juniperus morrisonicola ( Taiwan Alpine Juniper )
A very stocky, gnarled, small to medium-sized tree, native to high mountains of Taiwan that reaches a maximum size of 40 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.3 feet. Some records include; 26 years - 17 feet.
The awl-like foliage is silvery blue-green.
The red-brown bark is flaky.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( estimate..may be hardier ) in full sun on just about any well drained soil. It prefers a maritime climate.

* excellent photo link
http://www.conifersaroundtheworld.com/content/juniperus_morrisonicola_and_juniperus_tsukusiensis

Juniperus occidentalis ( Western Juniper )
Also called Sierra Juniper. A moderate growing, medium-size tree reaching around 50 feet with a horizontal branching habit with drooping tips, that is native to the high mountains from Washington to Idaho; south to California to Nevada. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2.5 feet; 20 years - 25 feet; largest on record - 100 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 14 feet; longest lived - 4000 years ( possibly even as much as 6000 years qualifying it as one of the longest lived trees on earth! ). The often twisted trunk and wide canopy of thick spreading to ascending branches give it a natural bonsai-like appearance. Rarely cultivated but makes an excellent landscape tree in the west.
The scale-like adult foliage is blue-green. Vigorous shoots may bear some spiny juvenile foliage.
The small cones are blue-green with a dusty pale blue-gray covering.
The red-brown bark is furrowed and flaking eventually dividing into large scaly plates.
Hardy zone 4 to 9 ( tolerating -33 F ), it prefers a soil PH of 6 to 8.5 and hates shallow clay. The Western Juniper does not grow well in humid climates.

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos of unknown internet source



* historical archive photos






* photos taken by Albert Everett Wieslander and the Marian Koshland Bioscience and Natural Resources Library, University of California






Juniperus osteosperma ( Utah Juniper )
A conical to rounded medium size tree reaching around 35 feet that is native to the southwest U.S ( from northern California to central Idaho to south-central Montana; south to southern California to central New Mexico ). Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 20 years - 25 feet; largest on record - 50 x 53 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet; longest lived - 650 years. It has a short and twisted trunk topped by a broad open canopy of ascending branches giving it a natural bonsai-like appearance.
The scale-like adult foliage is green.
The oblong to rounded berries up to 0.8 inches ripen to red-brown with a whitish bloom.
The fibrous bark is gray.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 preferring full sun on a soil with PH 6.5 to 8.2. Rare in cultivation, it has great potential for harsh climates and is even reported to grow in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photo taken by F. H. Miller @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by W.H. Shaffer @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by Richard C.P. Wilson and the Marian Koshland Bioscience and Natural Resources Library



Juniperus oxycedrus ( Prickly Juniper )
Also called Serbian Juniper. A dense, broadly conical tree of pendulous habit, that reaches around 40 feet. It is native to dry hillside woods of southern Europe and southwest Asia, also found in far northern Africa. Some records include: 6 years - 15 feet; 29 years - 27 feet; 100 years - 53 x 47 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet; largest on record: 66 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.2 feet; longest lived - 600 years.
The sharp pointed, needle-like foliage up to an inch in length are arranged in whorls of 3s. The foliage is deep green.
The round berries up to 0.5 inches wide ripen from green to purple-red with a whitish bloom.
The purple-brown bark flakes in vertical strips.
Hardy zones 5 to 10; it hates cool summers and humidity.

* excellent photo link
http://www.biodiversidadvirtual.org/etno/Juniperus-oxycedrus.-img6204.html
* video found on youtube


Juniperus phoenicaea ( Phoenician Juniper )
A slow growing, small dense conical to eventually rounded tree reaching up to 50 feet that is native throughout the Mediterranean Region from the Canary Islands and Portugal to the mountains of Saudi Arabia, north to Croatia.
Some records include: 20 years - 10 feet; 80 years - trunk diameter of 2 feet; largest on record - 52 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.3 feet ( trees as large as 140 feet with a trunk diameter of 14 feet may have existed over a thousand years ago before massive deforestation occured over the Mediterranean ); longest lived - 1000 + years.
The dark to blue green foliage is needle-like, up to 0.5 inches long, and in 3s on young plants. The foliage is scale-like on older plants.
The berries ripen to red-brown.
The bark is dark brown.

* excellent photo link found on internet
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Juniperus_phoenicea

Juniperus pinchotii ( Pinchot Juniper )
A rare small tree with a canopy of thick widespreading branches that is native to the southwest from northern Arizona to Oklahoma; south to the Mexican border from Arizona to central Texas.
Some records include: 30 years - 17 feet with a trunk diameter of 7.5 inches; largest on record - 40 x 25 feet with a trunk diameter of 4 feet. It is among the few Junipers that can resprout after fire.
The scale-like foliage, up to 0.1 inches long is yellow-green and arranged in 3s.
The sweet juicy red berries, up to 0.2 inches wide mature in one season.
The red-brown bark is divided into long narrow thin scales.
Hardy north to zone 6b, heat and drought tolerant. Rare in cultivation.

Juniperus pingii
An extremely beautiful, small to medium-sized tree, reaching up to 20 feet on average, that is native to Sichuan and Yunnan Provinces in China where it is endangered with extinction. Some records include: 10 years - 10 x 6 feet; largest on record - 100 feet.
It is dense and upright with weeping branch tips.
The foliage is bright to mid-green.
The exfoliating tan-color bark is very attractive.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( with hardiest clones tolerating -20 F or colder, even on exposed sites ).

* photo from unknown internet source


Juniperus polycarpos ( Persian Juniper )
Considered by some to be a subspecies of Juniperus excelsa, it is also called Juniperus macropoda. A small to medium-sized tree, native to mountains of the southern Caucasus; south to northern Iran to northwestern Pakistan. It also has a separate relic range in Oman on the Arabian Peninsula. In ideal conditions, it forms a beautiful, broadly-pyramidal to rounded tree, up to 82 feet in height with a trunk diameter up to 6.5 feet. Some records include: 5 years - 5 feet. In the wild it is often also commonly found to be much smaller and shrubbier in appearance on the harsh semi-desert conditions it is often found growing in. In some of the more arid portions of its range, it is the only tree forming coniferous forest at high elevations.
The foliage on younger trees is needle-like, up to 0.4 inches in length. The leaves on adult trees are scale-like, up to 0.1 inch in length. The foliage is blue-green.
The blue-black berries are up to 0.4 inches wide.
The bark is reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun on just about any very well drained soil. It is extremely heat and drought tolerant though may also thrive in the much more humid southeastern U.S..

* excellent photo links
http://www.yuthog.org/?Tibetan_Medicine/Medicinal_Plants&ID=12
http://www.birdsoman.com/Flowers/13-Gymnospermae/PersianJuniper/PersianJuniper.htm
http://www.forestryimages.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=3948050
http://www.forestryimages.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=3948048

var seravschanica
A subspecies found in mountains of central Asia ( from southern Kazakhstan; south to eastern Turkmenistan to northern Afghanistan to far northern Pakistan ). A moderate growing, upright, pyramidal ( eventually rounded ), small tree, native to the mountains of central Asia and Afghanistan. Some records include: 7 years - 7.1 feet.
The foliage is blue-green.
The bright blue berries are up to 0.6 inches long and wide.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 ( estimate, may prove hardier with testing )

* excellent photo link found on internet
http://www.fotomontaro.com/flora/cupressa/juniperus_seravschanica.shtml

Juniperus procera ( African Juniper )
A fairly fast growing large tree reaching around 100 feet that is native to high mountains in eastern Africa. Some records include: 5 years - 10 x 5 feet; largest on record - 170 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 12 feet.
The green foliage is awl-shaped on younger plants becoming scale-like on mature plants.
The glaucous green berries are tiny and round.
The bark is red-brown.
Hardy zones 8 to 11, grows in climates with between 16 & 48 inches of rainfall per year. Propagation is from seed which should be soaked in acid for 10 minutes before sowing.

Juniperus procumbens ( Japanese Garden Juniper )
A sturdy spreading groundcover shrub native to western China & Japan that can spread considerably. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 1 foot; 10 years - 32 inches x 10 feet; largest on record - 3 x 27 feet.
The stiff branches are curving and contorted giving it an exotic oriental look in the landscape.
The needles are prickly and blue-green. The foliage is always juvenile.
The brown-green berry-like cones contain 2 or 3 seeds.
Hardy zones 3 to 9, it is excellent for covering embankments and is very seaside tolerant.


* photos taken on July 15 2015 in Columbia, MD



* photos taken on Sep 19 2015 in Columbia, MD



'Nana'
Smaller in all its parts ( fastest recorded growth rate - 1 foot; 4 years - 0.8 x 3 feet; 6 years - x 6 feet; 10 years - 1 x 6.6 feet; largest on record - 32 inches x 13 feet ) with softer textured smaller leaves. Denser and slower growing, forming a low mat.

* photo taken on Oct 14 2012 in Crownsville, MD

* photos taken on Aug 14 2015 in Columbia, MD




* photo taken on Oct 5 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 15 2015 in Columbia, MD





* photo taken on Mar 18 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


Juniperus przewalskii ( Przewalskii's Juniper )
A medium-sized tree, reaching a maximum height of 66 ( rarely over 40 ) feet, that is native to mountains in western China.
The foliage is gray-green to blue-green. The leaves on younger trees are needle-like, up to 0.3 inches in length, and borne in whorls of 3. The leaves on older trees are scale-like, up to 0.1 inches in length.
The bluish-black, ovoid berries are up to 0.6 x 0.3 inches in size.
Hardy zone 5 to 7 ( estimate, may be much hardier ) in full sun on just about any well drained soil. It prefers a continental climate with a long cold winter.

* excellent photo link
http://www.arkive.org/przewalskiis-juniper/juniperus-przewalskii/

Juniperus pseudosabina ( Turkestan Juniper )
A Juniper native to the mountains of central Asia ( from Kasakhstan through most of Mongolia; south to Pakistan and Afghanistan and Xinjiang Province of China ). that becomes a small tree reaching a maximum height of 40 feet. Among the worlds oldest trees, the Turkestan Juniper can exceed 2000 years in age. It has become very rare in some parts of its range due to environmental destruction and over harvesting however remains abundant in other parts of its wide natural range.
The leaves are juvenile and needle-like, up to 0.3 inches in length, on younger plants. Tiny and scale-like, up to 0.1 inch long on adult plants. The foliage is gray-green.
The black, ovate berries, up to 0.6 inches long, are large for a Juniper.
The attractive, bright red-brown bark is fibrous and peeling.
Hardy zones 4 to 6 in full sun on just about any well drained soil. It requires a continental climate with long cold winters and short hot summers. Among the hardiest of all conifers, it even thrives on one of the driest ridges in central Asia ( Bolshoy Balkhan ). This very attractive Juniper has much potential in alpine regions of western North America including Denver, Colorado

* excellent photo link
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/image/id/3724.html

var turkestanica ( Turkmen Juniper )
A larger growing form from the western portion of Juniperus pseudosabina's range, forming a small to medium-sized tree that is native to Komarov, northern Pakistan and central Russia. It reaches a maximum height of 60 feet.

Juniperus recurva ( Drooping Juniper )
Also called Himalayan Juniper. It is a very attractive, graceful, broadly-conical tree with drooping branchlets that is native from the Himalayas, Burma to southwest China. Clones have been found as high as 10 000 feet in elevation where summers are wet and sunless and winters are cold. Some records include: 20 years - 17 x 10 feet; largest on record - 82 x 25 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.6 feet; largest in England - 51 feet.
The needle-like aromatic foliage up to 0.3 inches in length are arranged in whorls of 3 and are deep green.
Flowers of both sexes are borne on the same tree.
The glossy blue-black fruits are small ( up to 0.3 inches ) and round.
The orangish to red-brown bark peels in strips.
The timber is used for making coffins in China.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 ( hardiest clones from Kashmir ) preferring wet climates and humidity.

* historical archive photo


'Castlewellan'
Long pendulous branchlets similar to that of the Weeping Nootka Cypress. Largest on record - 47 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.

subsp 'Coxii' ( Coffin Juniper )
Graceful, dense and larger growing ( records include: 10 years - 20 feet; largest on record - 100 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 feet ). The slender branchlets are very weeping like that of the Weeping Willow.
The needles are shorter and sage green.

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC



'Densa'
A low spreading groundcover shrub reaching up to 1 x 3 feet with nodding branchlets bearing sprays of awl-shaped deep green foliage.

'Embley Park'
A fast growing, low spreading form with rich green foliage. Some records include: 10 years - 2 x 3.3 feet; largest on record - 3.3 x 10 feet.
Prefers partial shade.

Juniperus rigida ( Temple Juniper )
Also called Needle Juniper. A graceful, moderate-growing tree with spreading branches drooping at the ends, though it can be upright in habit when young. It reaches around 40 feet and is native to north-central China, Manchuria, Korea and Japan. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 20 years - 27 x 10 feet; largest on record - 60 x 25 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet; largest in England - 52 feet; largest in Pennsylvania - 52 x 25 feet @ Morris Arboretum. A large tree also grows at Taylor Arboretum in Wallingford, PA. A well grown Temple Juniper is a most spectacular tree when mature. Long-lived, they are known to survive up to 1400 years.
The stiff, linear, needle-like leaves, up to 1 inch in length, are borne in whorls of 3. The deep green foliage turns to bronze during the winter.
The bluish-black berries are up to 0.4 inches wide.
The attractive, shallowly-fissured and peeling bark is yellowish-brown to reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 ( Heilongjiang Provinceseed source should be tested in 2 b ) and very tough though it does grow best when sheltered from sweeping winter winds. It is hardy over much of eastern North America including Ottawa, Canada.

* photos taken @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C. on Feb 2009


* photos taken on Aug 25 2011 @ Scott Arboretum, Swarthmore, PA




* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON

* photos taken on Sep 3 2017 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* historic archive photo


Juniperus sabina ( Savin Juniper )
A spreading, self-layering groundcover shrub native from south and eastern Europe to southwest Russia, Siberia, and most of Mongolia.
The aromatic foliage, up to 0.3 inches long, is awl-shaped on young plants and scale-like on adult plants ( often adult and juvenile foliage appears on the same plant ). The foliage is deep green. The foliage contains savin, a medicinal compound.
The blue-black berries ( up to 0.3 inches wide ). are small and ovoid.The bark is grayish-brown.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 tolerating as low as -40 F, it grows even in Alberta and Saskatchewan's harsh climate. Thrives in sun or partial shade. Some varieties are prone to Juniper Blight, especially in the American Midwest.

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* historic archive photo


'Arcadia'
A ground cover shrub with lacy rich bright green blight resistant foliage. Some records include: largest on record - 3.3 x 23 feet ( typically half that ).

'Blue Danube'
A low groundcover shrub with ascending branches and gray-blue foliage that becomes purple tinted in winter. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 1 foot; 6 years - 1.7 x 6 feet; largest on record - 40 inches x 17 feet.

'Broadmoor'
A groundcover shrub with medium-green, blight-resistant foliage. Some records include: 10 years - 2 x 5 feet; 20 years - 3 x 10 feet; largest on record - 3 x 23 feet. This male clone does not produce berries.

* photos taken on Oct 19 2013 in Columbia, MD



'Buffalo'
A groundcover shrub with rich bright green feathery foliage. The foliage remains luxuriant green through the winter. The foliage keeps its color all year. Some records include: 5 years - 1 x 6.5 feet; 10 years - 16 inches x 8 feet; largest on record - 20 inches x 20 feet.
Unfortunately prone to blight however not as bad as 'Tamariscifolia'.
Hardy north to zone 2. Salt tolerant.

'Calgary Carpet' ( Calgary Carpet Juniper )
A low groundcover shrub with soft foliage that is bright green during summer, turning to bronze-green during winter. Some records include: 4 years - x 5 feet; 5 years - 1 x 6 feet; 10 years - 1.5 x 11 feet; largest on record - 1.5 x 13 feet.
Hardy north to zone 2.



* photos taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park



'Cupressifolia'
A spreading shrub with spreading to horizontal branches that reaches a maximum size of 7 x 13 feet.
The scale-like foliage, mostly in pairs, is deep blue-green.
Hardy zones 3 to 7

'Fastigiata'
A rare fast growing wild form that becomes a narrow columnar tree. Some records include: 10 years - 17 x 8 feet; 30 years - 39 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 inches largest on record - 50 x 17 feet.
The scale-like foliage is deep green.

'Hicksii'
A dense, bushy, semi-erect shrub, reaching up to 5 x 5 feet in 10 years, eventually up to 6.6 x 17 feet.
The needle-like foliage is bright gray-blue.

'New Blue Tamarisk'
Similar to 'Tamariscifolia' except this form is resistant to blight.

'Skandia'
A moderate growing, gracefully spreading, groundcover shrub, reaching up to 1.7 x 10 feet in 14 years, eventually slightly more. The feathery, gray-green foliage is borne in dense layers. Hardy zones 3 to 7. Blight resistant.

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Tamariscifolia'
A fast growing, dense spreading groundcover shrub with horizontal branches. Some records include; fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 10 years - 20 inches x 10 feet; 15 years - 1.8 x 15 feet; largest on record - 3 x 20 feet.
The needle-like foliage is deep blue-green.
Hardy zones 2 to 7. It is unfortunately very prone to blight even though it is still commonly used.

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON

* historic archive photo


Juniperus saltuaria ( Kansu Juniper )
An extremely rare to endangered tree native to high mountain coniferous forests in western China. It is dense and pyramidal in habit reaching a maximum size of 80 feet with a trunk diameter up to 2.5 feet though usually much smaller as it often grows on harsh sites in the wild. It is virtually unknown in cultivation outside it's natural range. The deep green foliage is borne on curved branchlets. The sharp, needle-like leaves, up to 0.3 inches in length, are borne in whorls of 3 on young trees. The foliage on older trees is scale-like, up to 0.1 inch in length, on older trees. The bluish-black berries are up to 0.4 inches in length.
Hardy zones 6 to 7 ( estimate, likely much hardier through more testing is needed ). This alpine tree prefers cool moist summers and snowy winters. It is not tolerant of drought.

Juniperus sargentii ( Sargent Juniper )
A fast growing, wide-spreading groundcover Juniper that is native to far northest China, Primoryi province in southeast Russia, Sakhalin and Kamchatka. It is found in mountain meadows and scrubland in the wild. Some records include: Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 16 inches x 6.6 feet; largest on record - 3.3 x 13 feet.
The mostly adult, scale-like foliage is deep green.
Hardy zones 3 to 8. It is very salt and heat tolerant. It is also resistant to twig blight that affects many groundcover Junipers.

* photo taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park

* historical archive photo


'Glauca'
Similar with bluish foliage.

* photo taken on Sep 5 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Sep 13 2015 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Oct 14 2015 in Baltimore Co., MD


Juniperus scopulorum ( Colorado Juniper )
Also called Rocky Mountain Juniper. A medium-size often multi-trunked tree reaching up to around 50 feet with sturdy spreading branches that is native to western North America ( from Iskut, British Columbia to Toad River in north-central British Columbia to Banff National Park, Alberta to southern Saskatchewan to northeast North Dakota; south to Nevada to El Paso to western Oklahoma...there is an additional separate population in northwest British Columbia ). It is critically endangered in Saskatchewan. Pyramidal when young it eventually becomes rounded and "cypress-like". Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 20 years - 23 x 6.6 feet; largest on record - 150 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 feet; longest lived - 3000 years.
The scale-like foliage is blue-green to light green.
The small rounded fruits up to 0.5 inches wide are glaucous-blue.
The bark is reddish-brown and peels in thin stripes.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 preferring dry hot summers and cold winters. It requires full sun on just about any well drained soil and is very drought tolerant. An excellent windbreak for the Great Plains. It is not well adapted to extremely humid summers and may become stressed and disease prone in the southeastern U.S.

* photos of unknown internet source


* photo taken by Ray M. Filloon @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by K.D. Swan @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by Charles A. Wellner @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook


* historic archive photo


'Blue Heaven'
A rapid growing, pyramidal tree reaching around 20 x 6 feet in 20 years, eventually up to 50 x 8 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet. It is frequently used for screening and looks especially good contrasting with reddish brick.
The foliage is intensely bright blue.
A female clone, it produces abundant berry-cones.
Very drought tolerant and grows well even in the harsh climate of North Dakota.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON


'Globe'
Also called 'Hillborne Silver Globe'. Moderate growing, dense, upright, rounded; reaching up to 5 x 5 feet in 10 years, eventually up to 9 x 12 feet. The feathery, juvenile foliage is silvery-blue.

'Gray Owl'
A vigorous, dense, spreading, large shrub with ascending branches. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 3 x 10 feet; largest on record - 10 x 27 feet.
and bright silvery-blue foliage that becomes purple flushed in winter.
Hardy zones 2 to 8

* photos taken on Aug 25 2013 @ University of Maryland, College Park



* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on July 11 2014

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


'Moonglow'
A moderate growing, dense, broadly-pyramidal tree, reaching up to 10 x 3 feet in 10 years, eventually up to 20 x 8 feet.
The foliage is intense bright silvery-blue.

* photo taken on July 26 2015 @ Niagara Parks Bot. Gardens, Niagara Falls, ON

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON

* photo of unknown internet source


'Silver King'
A dense, spreading, groundcover shrub, reaching up to 2 x 10 feet in 10 years.
The foliage is silvery-blue.

'Table Top Blue'
A moderate growing, flat-topped, spreading shrub, reaching up to 6.6 x 10 feet in 10 years, and an eventual maximum size of 10 x 23 feet.
The foliage is intense silvery--blue.

'Tollesons Blue Weeping'
A large very beautiful tree with pendulous branches and blue-green foliage. It has a very graceful shape and resembles the Weeping Willow in habit. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 3 feet; 10 years - 20 x 12 feet; largest on record - 50 x 40 feet.

* photo taken on October 2001 in Kingsville, Ontario



'Wichita Blue'
A moderate growing, columnar to pyramidal, small tree reaching a maximum size of 30 x 10 feet with drooping branch tips. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 2 feet; 5 years - 6 x 5 feet; 10 years - 12 x 6 feet.
The aromatic foliage is scale-like and intense silvery-blue.
Hardy zones 3 to 9

* photo taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on Sep 9 2014 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON



Juniperus semiglobosa ( Russian Juniper )
A moderate growing, pyramidal, medium-sized tree native to high mountains of central Asia ( from Shymkent in southern Kazakhstan to Kyrgystan to extreme western China; south to northeast Afghanistan to far northern India ). Some records include: largest on record - 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.6 feet. On ideal sites, it resembles Juniperus virginiana in habit, on more exposed mountainous terrain it is often stunted or even shrubby. Branchlets are often pendulous on older trees. Due to its large natural range it is not considered to be endangered, however environmental destruction has caused severe declines in parts of its range.
The leaves are needle-like, up to 0.3 inches in length, and borne in 2s or 3s on younger trees. The foliage is scale-like, up to 0.1 inch in length, on older trees.
The bluish-black berries are up to 0.3 x 0.4 inches in size.
The attractive, reddish-brown bark peels in long strips on older trees.
Hardy zones 4 to 7, it is extremely heat and drought tolerant but also tolerates and is native to regions with very short frost-free growing seasons. If prefers alpine continental climates where winters are cold with abundant snowfall and summers often hot and dry. In North America, parts of the Rocky Mountains, especially in Colorado resemble these conditions.

* excellent photo link
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/view/item/21275.html

Juniperus silicola ( Southern Redcedar )
A fast growing, very attractive, pyramidal, large tree with drooping branches, reaching around 50 feet. Some records include: 5 years - 10 feet; 20 years - 30 feet ( average ); largest on record - 120 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet. It is native to the coastal plain of the southeast U.S. ( from eastern Texas to North Carolina; south to central Florida ). It makes an excellent windbreak or also a street tree with the lower branches removed.
The attractive, fine-textured foliage is bright green.
The cones, up to 0.5 inches across, are smaller than the closely related Juniperus virginiana. They are great for attractive feeding birds.
The bark is cinnamon color.
Hardy zones 7 to 10 ( tolerating -8 F ) in sun or partial shade. Very tolerant of drought, sand and salt. Do not overwater.

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photos taken by W.D. Brush @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on July 11 2014

* photo taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.



'Brodie'
An attractive, fast growing, dense, upright pyramidal tree, reaching up to 30 x 15 feet. It makes an excellent screening tree for the southeastern U.S. and is a great replacement for the Leyland Cypress.
The feathery, scale-like foliage is bright green, turning to gray-green or purplish during winter.
It is a female clone bearing silvery "berry-cones".
Hardy zones 6 to 9.

* photos taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.





Juniperus squamata ( Singleseed Juniper )
Also called Flaky Juniper. A very variable shrub or small tree native from Afghanistan to western China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; largest on record - 100 x 25 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet ( subsp 'Fargesii' which averages around 45 feet with pendulous branchlets ).
The sharp, needle-like leaves are up to 0.4 inches in length. The dense foliage varies from silvery blue-green to gray-green.
The shiny black berries are up to 0.4 x 0.3 inches in size.
The red-brown bark is flaky.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 in full sun on very well drained soil. Very drought tolerant, it dislikes climates with hot humid summers.

* photo taken on Jan 2009 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Blue Carpet'
An attractive, dense, low, spreading, groundcover shrub, reaching a maximum size of 2.5 x 23 feet. Some records include: Fastest recorded growth rate - 20 inches; 10 years - 2 x 8 feet.
The attractive, needle-like foliage is bright silvery-blue.

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario



* photo taken on May 18 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara Falls Botanical Gardens, Ontario



'Blue Star'
A slow growing, very dense, rounded, small shrub, reaching a maximum size of 4 x 5 ( rarely over 2.5 x 4 ) feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 inches; 10 years - 2 x 3 feet.
The needle-like foliage is intense bright silvery-blue.
Tolerant of drought and wind.

* photo of unknown internet source



* photo taken on Oct 5 2011 in Ellicott City, MD




* photos taken on April 13 2012 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Oct 17 2014 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Apr 16 2015 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on Apr 22 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 23 2016 in Columbia, MD


'Chinese Silver'
A dense, bushy, multi-stemmed, upright large shrub to small tree with nodding branch tips, that can reach a maximum size of 13 x 13 feet if staked when young. Some records include: 10 years - 10 feet.
The awl-shaped foliage is intense silvery-blue.
Hardy zone 4 to 8

'Holger'
A low wide spreading shrub with nooding branchlets. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 inches; 10 years - 2 x 8 feet; largest on record - 7 x 26 feet.
The aromatic needle-like foliage is yellowish in spring turning to steel-blue the remainder of the year.
Hardy zones 4 to 8

'Meyeri'
A very handsome, semi erect open vase-shaped, very large multi-stemmed shrub that can be trained as a small tree. Some records are: 11 years - 9 x 9 feet; largest on record - 40 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 22 inches. The branches have short branchlets that nod at the tips.
The very dense awl-shaped foliage is intense blue at first later turning to deep green.

Juniperus taxifolia ( Ryukyu Juniper )
Also called Yew Juniper. A variable shrub or small tree native to Ryukyu Islands and a single location on Honshu Island in Japan. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 32 inches; largest on record - 40 feet. It often grows on coastal rocks exposed to fierce salt laden coastal winds, and thrives however develops a stunted, flattened form. It is critically endangered in the wild and continues to decline. Its wood was once used for posts and house building, trees large enough to harvest practically no longer exist.
The needle-like leaves, up to 0.6 inches in length, are bright green. The leaves are borne in whorls of 3.
The purplish-brown fruits are up to 0.4 inches wide.
Hardy zone 5 to 9

subsp 'Lutchuensis'
A prostrate flat groundcover resembling Juniperus conferta reaching up to 1 x 10 feet in 10 years. Excellent for use on embankments and to trail over walls. It is native to tiny Bonin Islands chain southeast of Japan and is critically endangered in the wild.
The awl-shaped foliage up to 0.4 inches in length is rich mid-green. The leaves are borne in whorls of 3.
The reddish-brown berries are up to 0.4 inches wide.
The stems are light brown.
Hardy zones 5 to 9.

Juniperus thurifera ( Hispanic Juniper )
A rare moderate growing, dense columnar tree reaching around 40 feet that is native to the mountains of Spain, France and northwest Africa. Some records include: largest on record - 70 x 40 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 feet ( likely none remaining over 6.6 feet ); ; longest lived - 1014 years; largest in England - 45 feet.
The branches are threadlike bearing gray-green scale like foliage up to 0.5 inches in length.
The fruits are round and glaucous blue-black.
Hardy zones 6b to 9 ( Tolerating - 13 F )


* video found on youtube


Juniperus tibetica ( Tibetan Juniper )
Also called Juniperus potanini. A slow growing, upright, pyramidal, medium-sized tree native to high mountain forests in Tibet and western China. Tibetan Juniper usually reaches around 45 feet though rarely to as much as 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.6 feet. It somewhat resembles Juniperus scopulorum in appearance. It is the only woody plant on some of the harsh Tibetan Plateaus where it occurs in the wild. Tibetan Juniper sets the record for the highest elevation ( 16,076 feet elevation in southeast Tibet ) any tree has ever been found growing wild north of the equator. It is becoming endangered in the wild, it continues to decline in its now highly fragmented natural range due to environmental destruction especially through overharvesting and overgrazing.
The foliage on young trees is needle-like, up to 0.3 inches long, and borne in whorls. The leaves on older trees are scale-like, up to 0.1 inches in length.
The attractive, very dense foliage is bright gray-green to deep green. The reddish-brown, rounded fruits, up to 0.6 inches wide, are large for a juniper.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 ( extreme high elevation seed source may be much hardier ). It is adaptable to cultivation thought largely untested. It survives in the British Isles though really prefers an alpine continental climate with cold snowy winters and hot often dry summers. In North America, its ideal climate zone is the southern Rockies, especially in Colorado.

* excellent photo links
http://www.exploretibet.com/blog/tall-and-straight-juniperus-tibetica/
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=89039&flora_id=800
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=105141&flora_id=800
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=105142&flora_id=800

Juniperus virginiana ( Virginia Red Juniper )
A native of central and eastern North America ( from southwest North Dakota to the northern shore of Georgian Bay in Ontario to Ottawa, Ontario to southern Maine; south to central Texas to central Florida ) this tree is commonly seen at 60 feet and under but can sometimes grow very large on ideal sites. It has been and still is abundant locally in the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region in the southern portion of Essex County, Point Pelee, the Lake Erie Islands as well as the Ohio lakeshore. Very large trees once formed pure stands on Point Pelee, the Lake Erie islands as well as Cedar Point near Sandusky, Ohio. The origional settlers found some up to 860 years old and 180 x 40 x 6.5 feet however these are long gone. The Red Juniper has extremely valuable lumber and most trees seen today are secondary growth. It is sometimes planted for lumber in central Europe. Generally growing at a moderate rate to 33 x 17 feet x 10 inches in 20 years, it is known to grow up to 4 feet per year and add up to 0.5 inches in diameter annually ( very rare ). One of the largest Red Junipers growing today has a trunk diameter of 6.5 feet and grows at Lone Hill Church, in Coffee Co., GA. Very large trees in Canada are reported to grow at 300 parkside, Waterdown, ON & in town in Ancaster, Ontario.
It is often planted for shelterbelts on the Great Plains.
The foliage borne on slender branchlets is scale like or short needle like ( to 0.5 inches arranged in pairs ) and blue-green to deep green. During winter the foliage often turns purplish in color.
The berry-like cones up to 0.3 inches wide are green at first ripening to blue with a glaucous bloom.
The bark is red-brown peeling in long vertical strips.
The timber weighs about 30 pounds per square foot, is fragrant and is used in the making of pencils.
Hardy zones 2 to 9 and thrives with soil PH anywhere from 4.6 to 8. Trial results on the northern Great Plains at Indian Head, Sask. and Brandon, Manitoba were varied; only the hardiest seed source with protection from wind for the first few years developed into fully hardy trees. It grows best in deep soil but is not fussy and likes limestone. It is also very drought & salt, pure sand, heat, storm and pollution tolerant. Young trees should be protected since they often have their bark girdled by mice. This Juniper performs better than other arboreal North American Junipers when planted in western Europe.
It is prone to Cedar Apple Rust and should not be planted near orchards.




* photo taken on July 17 2010 @ Morris Arboretum, Philly, PA

* photo taken on Aug 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario

* photos taken on May 8 2011 in Bel Air, MD



* photo taken on Aug 20 2011 @ Audubon Sanctuary, Montgomery Co, MD



* photos taken on Mar 7 2013 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on June 12 2013 in Columbia, MD


* photo taken on Oct 17 2013 in Olney, MD

* photos taken on Oct 31 2013 @ Hampton Ntl. Historic Site, Towson, MD



* photos taken on Apr 11 2015 @ Belmont Mansion, Elkridge, MD


* photo taken by W.H. Shaffer @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photos




* photos taken on Apr 28 2015 in Howard Co., MD






* photos taken Aug 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD

* photos taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD




* photo taken on Dec 12 2016 in Howard Co., MD

* photos taken on Mar 1 2017 in Howard Co., MD





* photos taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.


* photo of unknown internet source


'Bergs'
A rust resistant clone that is otherwise nearly identical to the species.

* photos taken on Sep 27 2013 in Laurel, MD













* photos taken on Oct 1 2013 in Howard Co., MD




* photos taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD




* photo taken on Apr 23 2015 in Howard Co., MD

* photo taken on Oct 19 2015 in Howard Co., MD


'Blue Arrow'
A moderate growing, dense, upright, narrow-columnar tree, reaching up to 15 x 2 feet in 20 years, with an eventual maximum size of 20 x 4 feet.
The fine-textured, scale-like adult foliage is intensely bright blue throughout the year.
Hardy zones 3 to 9.

* photo taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Rideau Hall, Ottawa, ON


'Blue Cloud'
A very attractive, dense, spreading shrub with twisting branches, reaching up to 1.7 x 5 feet in 10 years, with an eventual maximum size of 4 x 6.6 feet.
The fine-textured, scale-like adult foliage is silvery-gray.

'Burkii'
A fast growing, dense, upright, broad-pyramidal tree, reaching a maximum size of 40 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet.
The juvenile needle-like foliage is silvery-blue turning to purplish during winter. Scaly adult foliage may appear on older trees.

* excellent photo link
http://www.flickr.com/photos/37738527@N06/3476909174/

* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on July 11 2014

* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ U.S. Botanical Gardens, Washington, DC


* photos taken on July 26 2015 @ Niagara Parks Bot. Gardens, Niagara Falls, ON


* photo taken on Aug 5 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.





'Canaertii'
Rapid growing, dense and broad-pyramidal, reaching a maximum size of 62 x 36 feet. The slightly-twisted branchlets give it an artistic habit. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet.
The scale-like foliage is glossy rich deep green though may turn bronze during severe winters.
It bears abundant crops of fruit.

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario


* photos taken on Oct 21 2014 @ Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC



* photo taken on Aug 24 2017 @ U.S. Botanic Garden, Wash. DC.


'Emerald Sentinel'
A fast growing, upright-conical clone, reaching on good sites around 40 x 14 feet in 20 years, eventually much larger. Some additional records include: 5 years - 9 feet; 10 years - 20 x 7 feet. It makes an excellent screen, replacing Leyland Cypress from zone 3 to 5. The foliage is deep green throughout the year. This is a female clone that produces abundant, silvery berry-cones.

* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on July 11 2014

* photo taken on Aug 27 2017 in Elkridge, MD


'Glauca'
Dense and pyramidal with gray-green foliage in summer that turns silvery-gray in fall and winter. It is similar in growth and size to the species.



* photos taken on July 17 2010 @ Morris Arboretum, Philly, PA




* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Globosa'
A very attractive, dense, neatly rounded, dense shrub, reaching up to 3.3 x 3.3 feet in 10 years with an eventual maximum size of 17 x 17 feet.
The finely-textured, scale-like adult foliage is bright green.

'Henryi Blue'
Fast growing ( up to 3 feet per year ) with very attractive intense light blue wispy fragrant foliage.

* photos taken on Aug 3 2012 in London, Ontario



'High Shoals'
A faat growing, broad-pyramidal, medium-sized tree, reaching up to 40 x 15 feet or possibly larger with great age. This exceptional tree was discovered in Georgia by nurseryman Ray Tate.
The wispy, scale-like adult foliage remains mostly luxuriant bright green even during winter. It produces abundant bright blue-berries.
Hardy zone 3 to 8.

'Hillspire'
Also called 'Cupressifolia'. A moderate growing, dense, upright, broad-columnar, small tree reaching up to 25 x 4 feet in 15 years, and an eventual maximum size of 30 x 15 feet.
The foliage is blue-green to deep green throughout the year.
It produces abundant bright blue berries.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

'Hydrogreen'
Fast growing with foliage that is deep green even in mid-winter.
It is otherwise nearly identical to the species.

'Manhattan Blue'
A fast growing, dense, broad-pyramidal tree, reaching up to 37 x 16 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 inches in 30 years, eventually more. The twisted branchlets give this tree added character.
The bright blue to blue-green, scale-like foliage turns to purple during winter.
It is a female form that produces berries.

'Nova'
A fast growing, dense, upright, narrow-columnar small tree, reaching up to 18 x 5 feet. It makes a great screen for narrow lots. It makes a great Italian Cypress substitute for cold climates.
The foliage is blue-green.

'Pendula'
Graceful and elegant with spreading branches and drooping branchlets; reaching a maximum size of 50 x 40 feet. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 22 years - 37 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 inches.
The foliage is bright green.
It produces abundant berries.

* photo taken in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on 4th of July 2010 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 21 2016 in Annapolis, MD

* photos taken on Dec 12 2016 in Howard Co., MD




* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA




'Schottii'
A fast growing,small tree, that is columnar at first, later becoming broadly-pyramidal to nearly rounded. It can reach up to 30 feet in 22 years and an eventual maximum size of 37 x 30 feet. With age, it develops a gnarled appearance with twisted branchlets.
The foliage is blue-green.
It produced abundant berries.
Hardy zones 3b to 8.

'Skyrocket'
A fast growing very narrow columnar form, reaching a maximum size of 50 x 8 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 2 feet; 10 years - 15 x 2 feet; 20 years - 23 x 2.3 feet.
The fine-textured, scale-like foliage is silvery-blue.
Hardy zones 3 to 7. Similar looking 'Blue Arrow' has replaced it in many areas where Cedar Apple Rust is a problem.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis ( havlis.cz )


'Taylor'
A moderate growing, very dense, upright, narrow-columnar tree, reaching up to 20 x 4 feet in 20 years and a maximum size of 30 x 5 feet. It is a great Italian Cypress substitute for cold climates and also makes a great screen for narrow sites. It is a Nebraska Statewide Arboretum introduction that originated as a chance seedling in Taylor, Nebraska.
The attractive foliage is blue-green all year, even in North Dakota.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, this is among the best cultivars for the Great Plains.

* photo taken on Sep 8 2017 in Columbia, MD


Juniperus wallichiana ( Himalayan Black Juniper )
Also called Juniperus indica. A small tree reaching around 40 feet that is native to the Himalayas. It is ascending, narrow and columnar in its youth later becoming more spreading.
Some records include; fastest recorded growth rate - 1.5 feet; largest on record - 70 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 10.7 feet; largest in England - 47 feet.
The leaves are needle-like and up to 0.3 inches long on young trees; scale-like, up to 0.1 inches in length, on older trees. The foliage is deep gray-green.
The shiny black, oval fruits are up to 0.4 inches in length.
The bark is orangish.
Hardy zones 6 to 8, thrives in England.

4 comments:

  1. Thanks for all the information - I am in Texas and have recently planted 3 Hollywood junipers in a bed. I planted them 10 feet apart to allow for growth (I found very conflicting info on size when I researched). I see several of your pics show them close together, under eaves, etc. What is your recommendation for spacing? Thanks!

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  2. So beautiful Calgary
    What a great collection of photo es u have collected. the Landscaping in Calgary that you have in really appreciable..

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  3. Thank you! Very much appreciated. I will be doing some additional landscape touring in Canada this summer and hope to add many more photos upon returning.

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  4. Katherine: Hollywood Juniper spacing is complicated. My experience is that they are fast growing and can grow much larger than many people would expect.
    They can also be easily trained and pruned to much smaller sizes however trying to keep one under 9 feet in height of 5 feet in width is unrealistic. 10 feet apart is perfect if they are allowed to grow freely and assume their natural habit.

    ReplyDelete