Sunday, January 17, 2010

Spirea

A genus of approximately 70 species of shrubs that are distant relatives of the Roses and are native to cool to temperate regions of North America and Eurasia.
Spireas generally leaf out early in spring and can be either deciduous or semi-evergreen depending on species.
They generally prefer full sun on cool, moist soil. Most soil types are acceptable though some Spirea grow poorly on chalk soil. Spirea are deer resistant.
Spirea that bloom on current years growth in summer can be cut back hard in early spring for more vigor and better flowering.
Spring blooming Spirea that bloom on previous years growth need only older less vigorous canes to be removed immediately after blooming to make way for new growth.
Propagation can be either from half-hardened to soft tipped cuttings in summer.

Spiraea alba ( Meadowsweet )
An upright, slightly arching, rapid growing shrub reaching up to 6 x 5 ( rarely over 4 ) feet in size that is native to meadows, swamps and bogs in northern North America ( from central Alberta to central Manitoba to Sandy Lake, Ontario to Armstrong, Ontario to Fort Albany, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to Missouri to North Carolina ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was abundant around Point Pelee during the 1800s. It was also abundant around Detroit but uncommon on the Ohio shore during that time. It is an important host for Spring Azure Butterflies. It is closely related to Spiraea salicifolia which is sometimes found as an escape in North America.
The finely-toothed, pointed narrowly-oval leaves are up to 3 x 0.8 inches in size. The foliage is mid-green above, pale green beneath, turning to golden-yellow during autumn.
The white flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are born in conical panicles up to 12 inches in length during mid-summer, sometimes repeating into early autumn.
The young stems are covered in a fine red-brown down. The bark on older stems is attractive shaggy orangish-brown.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in sun to partial shade. Flood tolerant and rarely bothered by insect pests or disease.

* photo taken on Aug 3 2011 in Luzerne Co, PA

* photo taken on Aug 6 2013 in Windsor, Ontario

* photo taken by Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Spiraea 'Arguta' ( Garland Spirea )
The hybrid between Spirea thunbergii & S. multiflora. A dense, bushy, rounded, rapid growing shrub reaching up to 5 x 5 feet in 5 years, 6.6 x 6.6 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 10 x 13 feet.
The leaves are oval and can either have a smooth edge or a few teeth. They are up to 2 x 0.5 inches in size. The foliage is blue-green and turns to yellow and orange in autumn.
The white flowers are borne in clusters up to 2.5 inches across that are borne along the branches in early to mid spring.
The stems are slender and smooth.
Hardy zones 2 to 8, thriving even in Alberta and Saskatchewans harsh climate.

* photos taken on Apr 23 2015 in Howard Co., MD

* historical archive photos


Spiraea betulifolia ( Birchleaf Spirea )
A small, mounding shrub reaching a maximum size of 3.5 x 5 feet that is native to eastern Russia and Japan.
The toothed, rounded leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is reddish at first turning to light green. The autumn color is intense yellow to red over a long season lasting well into November.
The white flowers are borne in closely packed corymbs up to 4 inches across during late spring.
The stems are brown and smooth.
Hardy zones 2 to 6 in full sun to partial shade. Very tolerant of drought and clay. It is even hardy in interior Alaska.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historic archive photo


'Tor'
Vigorous, reaching up to 4.5 feet in 4 years; eventually reaching up to 4.5 x 9 feet.
The deep green foliage turns intense red to purple over a long period during autumn.

Spiraea x billardii
An upright to spreading, fast growing, suckering shrub that is the hybrid of Spirea douglasii & S. salicifolia. It reaches up to 8 x 8 feet in 10 years and an eventual maximum size of 8 x 10 feet.
The sharply-toothed, oblong leaves are up to 4 x 1.6 inches in size.
The foliage is mid-green above and downy gray beneath.
The red flowers are borne on dense panicles, up to 9 x 4 inches, during early to mid summer.
The branches are hairy.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 on acidic soil, it has proven hardy on the northern Great Plains. Can be invasive on some sites.

'Macrothyrsa'
Has bright pink flowers and wider leaves.

'Triumphans'
The leaves, up to 2.5 inches in length are only slightly downy beneath.
The flowers are deep pink.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


Spiraea blumei ( Blume Spirea )
A fast growing, spreading shrub, reaching a maximum height of 8 ( rarely over 6 ) feet, that is native to eastern China, Korea and Japan.
The heavily-toothed, obovate leaves, up to 1.7 x 1.8 inches in size, are blue-green, turning to yellow or orangish during autumn.
The white flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne on rounded clusters, up to 1 inch wide, during early summer.
The stems are deep reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 ( Inner Mongolia seed source should be tested in 2 ) in full sun to partial shade on just about any well drained soil.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Spiraea canescens ( Gray Stem Spirea )
A fast growing, upright, arching, large shrub reaching up to 10 feet that is native to the mountains in the Himalayas. The largest on record is 17 x 7 feet.
The oval to obovate leaves are toothed near the tip. They are up to 1 x 0.7 inches in size.
The foliage is dull deep green above and blue-gray beneath.
The white flowers are borne in dense clusters up to 2 inches across in early summer.
The branches are velvety and angular.
Hardy zones 4 to 9

* historic archive photo


Spiraea cantoniensis ( Reeve's Spirea )
A large, arching, spreading, very fast growing shrub reaching up to around 9 feet that is native to Japan and neighboring Jiangxi Province in China. Some records include: 10 years - 6.6 x 10 feet; largest on record - 16 x 10 feet.
The semi-evergreen, diamond-shaped leaves up to 4 x 0.8 ( rarely over 3 ) inches in size are heavily toothed or 3-lobed. The foliage is mid-green above and glaucous-blue beneath. The foliage turns to red in autumn though often falls very late and doesn't color at all. Foliage and flowers emerge very early in spring and may be damaged by late frost.
The white flowers are borne in rounded clusters, up to 2 inches across, during early spring.
The branches are smooth.
Hardy zones 4 to 9. Very heat tolerant and moderately drought tolerant.

* photo taken on Feb 8 2015 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on June 5 2016 in Elkridge, MD


'Floro Pleno'
Double flowers

Spiraea chamaedryoides ( Germander Spirea )
A fast growing, suckering, large, deciduous shrub native from eastern Europe to central Asia, reaching up to 8 x 7 feet. Some records include: 10 years - 7 x 7 feet.
The double-toothed, obovate or oblong leaves are up to 3 x 1 inches in size. The foliage is yellowish-green at first, turning to luxuriant mid-green in summer, then to wine-red in autumn. The clean, disease free foliage appears early in spring and lasts late in autumn.
The small white flowers are borne in clusters up to 2 inches across in spring.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 ( likely hardier ) and even thrives in harsh climates such as Minneapolis, MN; southern Saskatchewan and Fairbanks, AK.

Spiraea x cinerea
A fast growing, medium sized shrub reaching up to 6 x 6.5 feet, that is the hybrid between Spirea cana & Spirea hyperifolia.
The smooth-edged, oblong leaves are up to 1.7 x 0.4 inches in size. The foliage is bright green, turning to yellow or less often fiery orange-red during autumn.
The tiny white flowers are borne in small clusters appearig at the branch tips and to a lesser extent the leaf axils of lower branches in early spring ( around 10 days before Spirea x arguta ).
Hardy zones 3 to 8 and even thrives in Alberta's harsh climate.

'Grefsheim'
Reaching up to 6 x 10 feet with slightly weeping branches and narrower leaves. Some records include: 6 years - 4.5 x 6 feet; 10 years - 5 x 6 feet.
The very abundant flowers are borne during mid spring, a week or slightly more earlier than the species.
It is even hardy in Alberta, Canada and will regrow vigorously if winter dieback does occur.

* photo of unknown source on internet


Spiraea crenata ( Scalloped Spirea )
A vigorous, arching, rounded, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 5 x 6 feet in 5 years, to 6.5 feet in 9 years, that is native from central Europe to western Siberia, the Caucasus and central Asia.
The obovate leaves are up to 1.2 inches in length. The foliage is bright green.
The abundant, pure white flowers are borne in clusters during early summer.
The stems are reddish in color.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 ( possibly colder ).

Spiraea dahurica ( Dahurian Spirea )
A suckering shrub, reaching up to 5 feet, that is native to eastern Russia, northest Mongolia & Manchuria.
The lance-shaped to elliptical leaves are up to 1 x 0.4 inches in size.
The white flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne on racemes up to 0.8 inches long.
The twigs are reddish-brown, later turning to gray-brown.
Hardy zones 2 to 6.

Spirea decumbens ( Dwarf White Spirea )
A low spreading shrub reaching up to 2 x 5 feet, that is native to the European Alps. This very attractive Spirea can be used for groundcover.
The coarsely-toothed, elliptical or oblong leaves are up to 1.5 inches in length. The lush mid-green foliage can turn to yellow during autumn though often falls green.
The white flowers borne on clusters up to 2 inches across during early summer, through often also sporadically for the remainder of summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 7 and prefers cooler summers. Hates heavy clay.
An excellent rock garden plant.

Spirea densiflora ( Mountain Spirea )
A dense, broad-spreading, clumping, medium-size shrub reaching up to 8 feet in height, native to western North America from British Columbia to Alberta; south to California to Wyoming.
The serrate-edged, oval leaves, up to 1.7 inches in length, are glossy mid-green. The foliage turns to orange-red during autumn.
The flowers are pink-red and are borne in dense corymbs during mid-summer. A light shear after blooming will encourage repeat blooming. Attracts butterflies.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 in full sun to partial shade preferring cool moist sites in regions with over 40 inches of rainfall per year. The Mountain Spirea thrives far outside its native range in eastern North America and Europe. It does not grow well in climates with warm nights during summer. Older plants can be cut to ground during late winter for renovation.

* historical archive photo


Spiraea douglasii ( Western Spirea )
A fast growing, suckering, thicket-forming, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 10 x 8 feet that is native to western North America ( from Juneau, Alaska to Kitsault, British Columbia to Fort Nelson, B.C. to far southwest British Columbia; south to northern California to central Idaho to western Montana...a separate population is known from north-central Colorado ). It is also naturalized in parts of Europe and can be invasive on some sites. It is great as an informal hedge or screen. It is also useful for erosion control.
The toothed, oblong leaves, up to 4 x 1 inches in size, are glossy bright-green above and downy grayish-white beneath. The foliage often turns to intense orange during autumn.
The crimson-red flowers are borne in terminal panicles up to 8 inches in length are borne during mid-summer, often repeating sporadically during autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on moist, fertile soil. It is tolerant of flooding and is often found on floodplains in the wild. Older shrubs can be cut to ground for renovation.

* photos taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photo taken by http://www.nwplants.com

* photo taken by C. Kenneth Pearse @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photo


Spiraea flexuosa
A deciduous shrub, reaching up to 5 feet, that is native to eastern Russia; south to northwest China, much of northern Mongolia, Manchuria and Korea.
The deeply-cut, oblong leaves are up to 2.2 x 1 inches in size. The foliage is bright to mid green.
The pure white flowers are borne 4 to 10 in rounded clusters ( up to 1.2 x 1 inches in size ) during late spring after the foliage has emerged.
The twigs are purplish-brown.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 on alkaline soil. It is not pollution tolerant.

* excellent photo link
http://www.plantarium.ru/page/view/item/36488.html

Spiraea fritschiana ( Korean Spirea )
A fast growing ( up to 3 feet per year ), dense, mounding shrub native to central China and Korea that reaches up to 3 x 5 feet or very rarely 6.6 x 6 feet.
The attractive, toothed, elliptical leaves, up to 3.5 x 1.5 inches in size, are deep blue-green. The foliage turns to brilliant orange and red during autumn.
The white flowers are borne in clusters up to 5 inches across during late spring into early summer. Deadheading old blooms will extend bloom season.
The stems are glossy deep purple.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on just about any well drained soil.

'Pink Parasols
Similar except for pink flowers.
Reaches up to 6 x 8 feet in size.

Spiraea gemmata ( Mongolian Spirea )
Also called Spirea mongolica. An arching, deciduous, large shrub reaching up to 10 feet that is native to northwest China.
The narrowly-oblong leaves, up to 1 x 0.3 inches in size, are mid-green.
The small white flowers are borne in clusters, up to an inch across, during late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 6.

Spiraea henryi ( Henry Spirea )
A fast growing, large, deciduous shrub, up to 6.5 feet that is native to mountain woodlands in central and western China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 feet; largest on record - 10 x 12 feet.
The coarsely-toothed, oblong to obovate leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are glossy deep green above, silvery beneath. The foliage turns to golden-yellow during autumn.
The tiny white flowers are borne in clusters, up to 2 inches across, during late spring.
The stems are reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.

Spiraea hypericifolia ( Iberian Spirea )
A vigorous, upright, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 5 feet, that is native from southeast Europe to central Asia. It is also native from Siberia; south to northwest & north-central China, northern Mongolia and Manchuria. It makes a great low informal hedge.
The narrowly-oblong leaves are up to 0.8 x 0.3 inches in size. The foliage is mid-green.
The pure white flowers are borne 4 to 10 in dense, rounded clusters ( up to 1 inch wide ) during late spring after the foliage has emerged.
The twigs are grayish-brown.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 ( use northeast Asian seed source for 2 to 4 ) in full sun on very well drained soil. It is very heat and drought tolerant. It has proven hardy and thrived in trials at Brandon, Manitoba.

Spiraea japonica ( Japanese Spirea )
A upright to spreading, medium-size shrub native to central & eastern China, Korea and Japan, reaching a maximum size of 8 x 6.5 feet. The Japanese Spirea is fast growing, with a maximum growth rate of 4 feet.
The toothed, oval leaves, up to 4 x 2.5 ( rarely 6 x 4.3 ) inches in size. The foliage is mid to deep green above, pale or blue-green beneath; turning to orange, red or purple during late autumn.
The pink flowers are borne in terminal clusters, up to 6 inches across during early summer, often repeating during late summer if deadheaded.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in sun to partial shade on moist, fertile soil. The Japanese Spirea even grows in Alberta and southern Saskatchewans harsh climate though acting more like a perennial than a shrub. For vigor and better bloom, cut stems back hard in early spring to about 6 to 10 inches above the ground and remove the very old shoots at the base.
The flowering season last longer if old flower clusters are deadheaded. Propagation is from softwood cuttings taken in summer.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken on Oct 22 2013 in Towson, MD

* photos taken on June 20 2017 in Columbia, MD


var albiflora ( Japanese White Spirea )
An upright to arching, rounded, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 3 x 5 feet in 10 years with an eventual maximum size of 4.3 x 6.5 ( rarely over 2.5 x 4 ) feet. It is native to Japan.
The leaves, up to 3 x 1 inch in size, are rich green, turning to reddish-purple during autumn.
The showy, pure white flowers are borne on clusters, up to 4 inches wide, during early summer, sporadically the remainder of summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8. Prefers acidic soil and can be prone to chlorosis on alkaline soils. Pruning is the same as Spirea japonica.

* photo taken on Aug 29 2016 in Lebanon, PA


'Alpina'
Dwarf, dense and mounding, reaching up to 2 x 5 feet in 5 years and very rarely 3 x 6 feet with great age. The dense blue-green leaves are small ( up to an inch in length ) and the flowers are lilac-pink. Excellent for use cascading over walls.
Survives in Calgary, Alberta if sheltered.

'Anthony Waterer'
Compact and upright, up to 3 x 5 feet in 5 years; 5 x 5 feet in 10 years and very rarely to 6 x 5 feet with great age though often much less with less than ideal growing conditions.
The coarsely toothed, oval leaves up to 4 inches in length are reddish when young turning to deep green during summer. The leaves turn to purple during late autumn.
The reddish-pink flowers are borne in dense flower heads, up to 6 inches across, during early summer.

* photo taken @ Clarksville, MD on June 2011

* photo taken on June 10 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 7 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on June 18 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 12 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on June 9 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Dec 7 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 1 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON

* photo taken on Nov 4 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 4 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Bullata'
Slow growing dwarf reaching a maximum size of 3.3 x 6 ( rarely over 2 x 3 ) feet in 15 years, eventually slightly more.
The flowers are deep red-pink borne in terminal clusters, up to 3 inches across, from late spring through most of summer if deadheaded.
The coarsely-toothed, thick, leathery, small leaves are up to 1.3 inches in length. The foliage is deep blue-green above, gray-green beneath.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 it is less tolerant of extreme heat than other cultivars.

'Crispa'
Reaches 4 x 5.5 feet in 10 years.
Has deeply cut, crispy, puckered, deep green foliage and deep pink-red flowers all summer long. The flowers are sterile, making this a useful cultivar in regions where Spirea japonica is considered invasive.
Excellent choice for use in Alberta.

* photo taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


'Dakota Goldcharm'
Fast growing, reaching up to 3 x 5 ( usually half that ) feet, with foliage that is deep red at first, turning to lime-green during summer. The leaves turn to red during autumn.
The pink flowers are borne on clusters, up to 3 inches across, during late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 7, it thrives in Alberta, north to Edmonton.

'Darts Red'
Reaches up to 5 x 5 ( rarely over 3.5 ) feet with medium green foliage and reddish-pink flowers all summer long ( if deadheaded ). The flowers are sterile, making this a useful cultivar in regions where Spirea is considered invasive.

'Dolchica'
Heavily serrated purplish foliage and red flowers.
Reaches a maximum size of 6 x 8 feet, though averaging under 4 feet.

* photos taken on Aug 2 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos taken on June 12 2014 in Columbia, MD


'Fastigiata'
Upright and vase-shaped in habit, reaching up to 5 feet in height.
The white flowers are borne in very wide clusters.
Hardy zones 4 to 8, heat tolerant even thriving in all of North Carolina.

'Firelight'
Similar to 'Goldflame' but foliage is deeper red in spring and turns intense scarlet-red during autumn.
Reaches up to 3 x 3 feet in 5 years with a maximum size of 5 x 6 feet.
Hardy zones 4 to 8.

* photo taken on May 14 2012 in Columbia, MD


'Froebelii'
Vigorous, dense and rounded, reaching up to 4 x 5 feet in 5 years with a maximum size of 5 x 6 feet. The foliage is brownish-red at first turning to deep green during summer. The leaves turn to purple and red during autumn.
The flowers are similar to that of 'Anthony Waterer' but are lighter pink.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, it may be the most cold hardy of the cultivars and certainly does thrive in Minnesota. It is also very heat as well as drought tolerant.

* photos taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON

* photos taken on May 26 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Glabrata'
Similar to 'Anthony Waterer' but very fast growing with very large leaves, up to 5 x 3 inches and huge flower clusters up to 12 inches across.

'Gold Charm'
Dense and compact, reaching up to 1.5 x 4 feet.
The foliage is orangish at first turning to golden-yellow then finely green by mid-summer. The leaves turn to fiery orange and red during autumn.
Hardy north to zone 3

'Golden Elf'
A miniature groundcover form, to 1.3 x 4 feet with golden-yellow foliage. Some records include: 5 years - 1.2 x 2.5 feet.
Flowers are pink.

* photo taken on on Aug 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 22 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 28 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 9 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA

* photos taken on June 4 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Golden Princess'
Dense, compact and mounded in habit, reaching up to 3 x 4 feet in 5 years with an eventual maximum size of 4 x 4 feet.
The foliage is bronze at first during spring, turning to golden-yellow by summer.
The abundant flowers are pale pink.

'Goldflame'
Reaches up to 3 x 5 feet in 5 years, and eventually to 4 x 6 or very rarely 4.5 x 7 feet. The foliage is orange-red during spring turning to golden-yellow then to bright green during summer. The leaves turn to orange-red late in autumn ( very often in December ).
The mid-pink flowers are borne in terminal clusters during early to mid-summer.
Very heat tolerant even in the southeast however foliage may turn to regular plain green during summer.

* photos taken @ Clarksville, MD

* photos taken on June 9 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 9 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 8 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 27 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Goldmound'
Reaches up to 2.5 x 4 feet in 6 years with an eventual maximum size of 4 x 6.7 feet.
The foliage is golden-yellow during spring and summer. The leaves do not turn to green like that of 'Goldflame' during hot summers. The foliage does however turn to glowing orange-red during autumn.
The pale pink flowers appear all summer long.









* photo taken on August 2 2010 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on August 5 2010 in Clinton, Ontario

* photo taken on June 1 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on Aug 3 2012 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on Aug 2 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on June 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 9 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 25 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 28 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON

* photos taken on May 27 2017 @ Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, Vienna, VA


'Halward Silver'
Similar to species except for white flowers.
Hardy north to zone 3.

'Lemon Princess'
Similar to 'Goldmound' except with even brighter yellow foliage that retains its color better during summer. It can reach up to 3 x 3 feet in 5 years with an eventual maximum size of 4 x 6.7 feet.

* photos taken on July 16 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Lime Mound'
Reaches a maximum of 4 x 6 feet with bright lime-green foliage and pink flowers. The foliage turns to red and orange during autumn.
Hardy north to zone 3.

* photo taken on Oct 2 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 13 2015 in Pikesville, MD

* photo taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on May 8 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Little Princess'
A compact, mounding semi-dwarf form reaching up to 3 x 4 feet or very rarely as much as 4.8 x 7 feet.
The coarsely-toothed, oval leaves are smaller than average only reaching up to an inch. The foliage is deep green during summer turning to red during autumn.
The tiny pink flowers are borne on small but abundant dense terminal flower heads, up to 1.5 inches across, during early to mid summer.
Hardy zones 2 to 9

* photo taken in Laurel, MD in June 2009

* photo taken on May 1 2010 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 10 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 7 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on June 18 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Oct 25 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 1 2014 @ Maryland Horticulturalist Society garden tour, Columbia

* photos taken on June 2 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON

* photos taken on Nov 14 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Nov 28 2016 in Howard Co., MD


'Macrophylla' ( Bigleaf Japanese Spirea )
Similar to species except for larger leaves, up to 7 x 3 inches, that turn to deep red during autumn.

'Magic Carpet'
A fast growing, dense, compact shrub, reaching a maximum size of 3 x 4.5 ( rarely over 2 ) feet. Some records include: 4 years - 2 x 3.4 feet.
The foliage is vibrant orange-red at first, turning to brilliant yellow-green during summer. The leaves turn to orange or russet during late autumn.
The intense deep pink flowers appear early to mid-summer.

* photo taken on April 4 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on April 28 2010 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 10 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 26 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photo taken on July 27 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on June 15 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 24 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Sep 23 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 2 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 18 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Apr 27 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 4 2017 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 18 2017 in Columbia, MD


'Nana'
A dwarf form reaching up to 2 x 4 feet though has been recorded growing to 2.5 x 6 feet in 15 years.
The bright pink flowers and the deep green foliage resemble that of 'Little Princess'.

'Neon Flash'
Dense, compact and rounded in habit, reaching up to 4 x 5 feet in 10 years or very rarely as much as 5 x 6 feet. It originated at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, Maryland.
The foliage is rich purple-green during spring turning to deep green during summer. The leaves turn to deep burgundy-red during autumn.
The intense reddish-pink to scarlet-red flowers appear during early summer. The flowers are sterile, making this a useful cultivar in regions where Spirea japonica is considered invasive.

* photos taken on May 15 in Baltimore, MD


'Royal Knight'
Dense and domed in habit, reaching a maximum size of 5 x 5 feet.
The foliage is bronze at first, turning to green during summer then to deep red during autumn.
The deep pink-red flowers are borne on large clusters during late spring into early summer.

'Royal Prince'
Upright in habit, reaching up to 4 x 4 feet.
The foliage is coppery at first then turning to deep green.
The large flowers are red-pink.

'Shirobana'
A vigorous, domed shrub, reaching up to 4 x 6 feet in 10 years or very rarely 5 x 9 feet. The attractive foliage is glossy deep green.
The flowers appear both pink and white on the same plant abundantly during early summer then sporadically during the remainder of summer.

* photos taken on June 3 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 12 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Jun 24 2016 in Ellicott City, MD


Spiraea latifolia ( Meadowsweet )
A upright, suckering shrub, up to 6 feet in height that is native to woodlands, sandy shorelines, swamps and bogs in eastern North America ( from Kenora, Ontario to Sioux Lookout, Ontario to Lake Nipigon, Ontario to Chapleau, Ontario to Temagami, Ontario to Newfoundland; south to Kincardine, Ontario to Kitchener, Ontario to Niagara Falls, Ontario to western North Carolina to New Jersey ). It is common on the north shore of Lake Superior
The coarsely-toothed, obovate leaves are up to 3 x 1.2 inches in size. The deep green foliage turns to yellow during autumn
The white to pink flowers, up to 0.2 inches wide, are borne in clusters up to 8 inches in length at the tips of the new growth all summer long.
The stem are reddish. The very old stems have shaggy gray bark.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in full sun on moist, light soil.

* photos taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Spiraea lucida ( Shinyleaf Spirea )
Also called Spiraea betulifolia var lucida and Western White Spirea. It is a moderate growing, upright, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 3.3 x 3 feet, that is native to western North America ( from Bella Coola, British Columbia to Fort St. John, B.C. to Slave Lake, Alberta to Saskatchewan to Minnesota; south to southwest Oregon to Wyoming to central South Dakota ). In Saskatchewan; it is locally common in the Cypress Hills but is generally considered nearly endangered. It is found in open woods and streambanks in the wild.
The coarsely-toothed, oval leaves, up to 3.5 x 2 inches in size, are deep green above, pale green beneath. The foliage turns to intense deep red over a long period lasting mid to late autumn.
The white flowers are borne on dense flat clusters, up to 5 inches across, during early summer.
Hardy zones 2b to 8 in full sun to partial shade on well drained soil. It is very drought tolerant due to its deep taproot.

* photo taken by http://www.nwplants.com

* historic archive photo


Spirea media ( Russian Spirea )
A medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 6.5 x 6.5 feet, that is native from central Europe to the Kamchatka Peninsula; south to the Balkan Peninsula to western & northern Mongolia, Manchuria, Korea and Japan.
The smooth-edged, elliptical or oblong leaves, up to 1.6 x 0.6 inches, are blue-green, often turning to rich red during autumn.
The white flowers are borne on flat clusters from late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 ( 2 for var. sericea of northeast Asia and Mongolian seed source ) in full sun to partial shade.

'Double Play Blue Kazoo'
Similar to species, but much more compact, reaching only 3 x 3 feet, with exceptionally blue foliage.
The foliage is often deep red at first and turns back to red in the fall.

* photo taken on May 8 2016 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 5 2016 in Elkridge, MD


'Snowstorm'
Reaches up to 4 x 5 feet or very rarely 6 x 7 feet.
The leaves are up to 4 x 3.5 inches in size. The blue-green foliage turns brilliant orange and red in autumn.
The white flowers are borne on massive dome-shaped clusters, up to 8 inches across, during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 tolerating as low as -30 F and deer resistant.

* photos taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photos taken on May 7 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 26 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on May 20 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 18 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 9 2017 in Columbia, MD


Spiraea miyabei ( Miyabe Spirea )
A dense, rounded shrub reaching up to 6.5 x 5 ( rarely over 4 ) feet in size, that is native to eastern and southern China and Japan.
The double-toothed ovate leaves are up to 2.8 x 0.8 inches in size. The attractive, blue-green foliage turns orangish-red during autumn.
The small, pure white flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne in wide clusters, up to 4 inches across, during early summer.
The stems are reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 4 to 7, it is more drought tolerant than most spireas.

* photos taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photo taken on May 8 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photo taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Spirea mollifolia
A medium-size shrub, up to 8 x 7 feet, that is native to western China.
The oblong foliage, up to 1 x 0.2 inches in size, is covered in silky down. The foliage is blue-green.
Small white flowers are borne on small umbels on short side shoots in early summer.
The branches are reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 5 to 9.

Spiraea myrtilloides ( Myrtle Spirea )
A large shrub reaching up to 8 feet though the largest on record is much larger at 10 x 17 feet. It is native to western and central China.
The ovate or oblong leaves, up to 0.8 x 0.3 inches in size, are mid-green.
The tiny white flowers are borne on clusters, up to 1 inch wide, during early summer.
The branches are reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 4 to 8. Very heat tolerant and thrives in Mid Atlantic summers.

Spiraea nervosa
Also called Spiraea dasyantha. A medium-sized, erect shrub reaching a maximum height of 10 ( rarely over 6 ) feet that is native to eastern China and Japan.
The deeply-veined, toothed, broadly-ovate to rounded leaves, up to 1.7 inches in length, are dull deep green.
The small white flowers are borne in tight clusters along the branches late spring into summer.
The stem are red-brown and arching.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 ( seed source from Inner Mongolia may prove even hardier...hardiness varies depending upon seed source )

Spiraea nipponica ( Nippon Spirea )
A dense, bushy, arching, mounding, rapid growing shrub, reaching up to 5 feet or more, that is native to eastern China, Korea and Japan. Some records include: 10 years - 6.6 x 10 feet; largest on record - 10 x 13 feet.
The leaves, up to 1.5 x 0.5 inches are oblong with teeth towards the tip. The foliage is bright green at first, turning to deep blue-green. The leaves usually turn to yellowish-green during autumn.
The pure white flowers, up to 0.4 inches wide, are borne in dense rounded clusters, up to 1.5 inches wide, along the stems during late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, thrives even in Alberta. Propagation is from softwood cuttings in summer.

* photos taken on May 16 2010 @ Cylburn Arboretum, Baltimore, MD


* photo taken on July 24 2015 in Goderich, ON

* historic archive photo


'Halward's Silver'
More compact in habit, reaching up to 3 x 5 feet in 5 years, eventually 4 x 8 feet.
Deep blue-green foliage and abundant, pure white flowers during late spring.
It is even hardy in Alberta, Canada and will regrow vigorously if winter dieback does occur.

'Rotundifolia'
Broader leaves and slightly larger flowers.

'Snowmound'
Fast growing but smaller and more compact, reaching up to 5 x 5 feet in 5 years, with an eventual maximum size of 6 x 8 feet.
The foliage is blue-green, turning to yellow, orange and red during autumn.

* photo taken on May 14 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on May 19 2013 in Howard Co., MD

Spiraea prunifolia ( Bridal Wreath Spirea )
A fast growing, large, dense, rounded shrub up to 8 feet or more that is native to China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 4 feet; 10 years - 6.6 x 8 feet; largest on record - 12 x 13 feet.
The oval to obovate leaves are up to 2 x 0.8 inches in size. The foliage is bright green at first, turning to mid-green during summer then finally to fiery orange and red during autumn.
The white flowers are borne on abundant dense clusters, up to 2.5 inches across, during early spring.
The flowers can tolerate temperatures as low as 18 F without injury.
Hardy zones 3 to 8

'Plena'
double white flowers.

Spiraea pubescens ( Downy Spirea )
An arching, medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching up to 7 x 6 feet in size, that is native to eastern Russia, eastern Mongolia, much of northern China and Korea. It is fast growing with rates up to 4 feet reported.
The deeply-toothed, ovate or obovate leaves are up to 3.5 x 2 inches in size. The foliage is bright green above, downy gray beneath; turning to yellow, orange and red during autumn.
The pure white flowers are borne late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 6 ( likely 2 for Mongolian seed source ) and prefers partial shade.

* photo taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


Spiraea salicifolia ( Willowleaf Spirea )
A vigorous, upright, large, suckering shrub reaching up to 7 x 7 feet that is native from central Europe to northeast Asia ( including Russia, north & eastern Mongolia, far northern China. Korea and Japan ).
The double-toothed, oblong leaves are up to 4 x 1.6 inches in size. The foliage is bright green at first, turning to smooth, mid blue-green.
The pink flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne in upright, cylindrical panicles during mid-summer.
Hardy zones 2 to 8, it is tolerant of wet sites and flooding. The hardiest seed source has proven hardy on the northern Great Plains.

* historic archive photo


Spiraea sargentiana ( Sargent's Spirea )
A medium-sized, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum height of 6.5 feet, that is native to western and central China. It resembles Spirea japonica in habit.
The elliptical or obovate leaves, up to 1.2 x 0.5 inches in size, are deep green.
The creamy-white flowers are borne on clusters, up to 2 inches wide, during early summer.
The twigs are reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 4b to 8. It thrives at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada but is otherwise practically unknown in North America.

Spirea 'Snow White'
The hybrid between Spirea trichocarpa & S. trilobata.
A vigorous, dense, arching, medium-sized, deciduous shrub that can reach a maximum size of 7 x 9 ( rarely over 5 ) feet. This hybrid was raised by Dr. F. Skinner of Dropmore, Manitoba and is very valuable for screening and hedging on the northern Great Plains.
The leaves, up to 2 inches in length are bright green turning to attractive yellow during autumn.
White flowers smother the branches during late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 ( reports of 2b in Manitoba ).

Spiraea splendens ( Mountain Spirea )
A shrub, reaching up to 3.3 x 5 ( rarely over 2 ) feet, that is native to mountain meadows in western North America ( from British Columbia to Alberta to south-central Montana; south to central California to northwest Wyoming ).
The toothed, oval leaves, up to 1.6 x 1.2 inches in size, are bright green at first, turning to blue-green. The foliage turns to golden-yellow during autumn.
The mid-pink flowers are borne on flat-topped clusters during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( estimate...it may be hardier than that ) in full sun to partial shade on moist soil. Prune in the same way you would Spiraea japonica.

* photos taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos


Spiraea thunbergii ( Thunberg Spirea )
A fast growing, dense, twiggy, medium-size shrub native to northeast China and Japan. Some records include; 10 years - 6.6 x 8 feet; largest on record - 7.5 x 8 feet.
The toothed, lance-shape foliage, up to 2 x 0.3 inches in size. The bright green foliage turns to red very late in fall.
The white flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne on abundant clusters, up to 2 inches across, during early spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, thriving as far south as Savannah, GA.

* photo taken on March 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Mar 16 2012 in Columbia, MD


* photos taken on Apr 18 2015 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Nov 19 2016 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photos taken on Dec 3 2016 in Columbia, MD

* historical archive photos


'Fujino Pink'
Rapid growing, reaching up to 7.5 feet in just 3 years, eventually up to 7.5 x 8 feet.
The flowers are deep pink in bud opening up to light pink.
The bright green foliage turns to intense fiery orange in autumn.

'Mellow Yellow'
Also called 'Ogon'. Shorter growing ( 4 years - 5 x 6 feet; largest on record - 5 x 8 feet ) with golden foliage up to 2 x 0.25 inches in size.



* photo taken on April 11 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on May 6 2010 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD

* photos taken on Aug 8 2011 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Mar 15 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 11 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photo taken on May 7 2014 @ London Town Gardens, Edgewater, MD

* photo taken on June 12 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Apr 17 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC


'Mt. Fuji'
Smaller growing, to 4.3 x 7 feet ( rarely over 3 x 4 ) in 10 years; reaching an eventual maximum height of 5 feet.
The very narrow, willow-like, deep green foliage is splashed with white variegation. The foliage turns to fiery orange during autumn.
The flowers are white.

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD


Spiraea tomentosa ( Steeplebush )
A vigorous, dense, thicket forming upright shrub reaching up to 7 x 7 ( usually lower ) feet in size. It is native to marshes and swamps in eastern North America ( from southeast Manitoba to Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Chapleau, Ontario to Timmins, Ontario to Nova Scotia; south to Arkansas to far northern Georgia ). During the 1800s, it occurred sporadically at Detroit, Michigan. It was very rare on the Ohio shore during that time but there was a sizable population at Oxford Prairie.
The tooth-edged leaves, up to 3 x 0.8 inches in size, are dull mid-green above and downy yellow-gray beneath. The foliage turns to orange in autumn.
The pink, deep red or light purple flowers are borne in dense terminal panicles, up to 7 x 2.5 inches, during late summer. The flower clusters look like that of the Astilbe and are attractive to butterflies.
The younger stems are covered in a brown velvety coating. The older stems are smooth purplish-brown to reddish-brown.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 in sun or partial shade on moist to wet acidic soil, preferrably sandy. Flood tolerant and resistant to pests and disease. Some of the hardier seed source is hardy even in much of Alaska.

* photo taken by L. Scott Ranger @ USDA SCS. Southern wetland flora


Spiraea trichocarpa ( Korean Spirea )
A vigorous, stiff, spreading shrub native to Korea. Some records include: 10 years - 6.6 x 8 feet; largest on record - 7 x 10 feet.
The pointed, oblong leaves up to 2.7 x 1 inches are lightly toothed towards the tip. The foliage is vivid glossy fresh green, turning to yellow during autumn.
The white flowers are borne in dense clusters up to 2 inches across at the branch tips in early summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 9

Spiraea trilobata ( Three-Lobed Spirea )
A dense, twiggy spreading shrub, reaching around 4 feet though sometimes as much as 8 x 10 feet, that is native to Siberia, northern China and Korea; south to Kazahkstan.
The coarsely-toothed, rounded leaves are up to 2 x 1 inches in size. The foliage is deep blue-green with only some yellow autumn color.
The small white flowers are borne on abundant, dense umbels, up to 2 inches wide, during late spring.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 and very shade tolerant for a spirea. It has proven fully hardy at both Indian Head, Sask. and Brandon, Manitoba.

* photos taken on May 1 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photos taken on Dec 9 2015 in Columbia, MD

* historic archive photo


Spirea 'Tor'
intense red autumn color

Spiraea x vanhouttei ( Bridalwreath Spirea )
A rapid growing, robust, arching shrub reaching around 8 feet that is the hybrid between Spirea cantoniensis & S. trilobata. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 4 feet; 10 years - 8 x 10 ( avg ) feet; 15 years - 10 x 12 ( avg ) feet; largest on record - 10 x 23 feet.
The toothed, diamond-shaped leaves are up to 2 x 1.2 inches in size. The leaves sometimes have up to 5 lobes.
The deep blue-green foliage, turns to orange-red during autumn.
The small, white flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne in dense umbels up to 2 inches across, along the shoots during mid to late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade. It is known to survive even in Fairbanks, Alaska and thrive on the northern Great Plains. Tolerant of pollution but unfortunately prone to leaf mildew. Prune after flowering to remove old shoots that have lost their vigor.

* photos taken on May 6 2010 in Howard Co., Maryland



* photos taken on April 27 2012 in Columbia, MD
* photos taken by USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database. North Dakota tree handbook

* photo taken on Nov 6 2015 in Columbia, MD


'Renaissance'
Resistant to foliar diseases.

Spirea veitchii ( Veitch's Spirea )
A handsome, vigorous, arching, deciduous, large shrub reaching up to 10 feet, that is native to Gansu, Guizhou, Henan, Hubei, Shaanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan Provinces in China. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 8 feet; largest on record - 15 x 10 feet.
The toothed, oblong to obovate leaves, up to 2 x 0.3 inches in size, are glossy mid-green. The foliage turns to intense yellow, orange and red during autumn.
The white flowers, borne during late spring, resemble that of the Bridalwreath Spirea.
Hardy zones 4 to 8

Spiraea virginiana ( Virginia Meadowsweet )
A dense, arching, clumping, deciduous shrub, reaching a maximum size of 10 x 10 feet, that is native to the southern Appalachian Mountains ( from Ohio to Pennsylvania; south to northern Louisiana, northern Alabama and far northwestern Georgia ). Some records include: 2 years - 4 feet; 6 years - 6 + feet. It is endangered in its native range, now extinct from Pennsylvania and only remains in 24 known locations in the wild throughout its entire range. Though rare, it shouldn't be, it makes an excellent landscape plant over much of eastern North America. This plant is sold by one of Americas top native plant nurseries Woodlanders based in Aiken, South Carolina. It is not for sale outside South Carolina.
The very finely-toothed, oblong leaves, are up to 2.5 inches in length. The attractive, leathery, deep blue-green foliage turns yellowish during autumn.
The white flowers are borne on clusters up to 6 inches across, during early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade, preferring moist conditions. It is tolerant of heat, clay and flooding.

* photo of unknown internet source


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