Sunday, January 17, 2010

Poplars & Aspens

A genus of around 35 species of trees that are native over most temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. They are typically trees that colonize barren land and are short lived however provide shelter for trees of more permanent future forests. They are also very valuable for shelterbelts on the Great Plains for protect agricultural crops from the ravages of drying high winds and wind erosion. Such shelterbelts also shelter homes cutting utilities costs and also prevent snow from blowing away in winter thus increasing soil moisture in spring.
The timber is soft and white; it is mostly used in the production of particle board, wood chips, boxes, crates, plywood and pulpwood for the making of paper. Builders sometimes ignore building codes and use it for log cabin homes.
The wood splits easily but is weak and soft. Poplar makes a good coppice crop since if cut during the dormant season, regeneration occurs very quickly during the following growing season with the new tree often growing faster than the original.
Male and female flowers usually occur on separate trees both which need to be present to produce seed.
Poplars prefer full sun on a deep, moist, fertile, well drained soil though many can tolerate flooding. Most do have very vigorous root systems that can be invasive and should NOT be planted near drains, septic systems or paving.
Care should be taken when choosing a Poplar since you want a healthy tree with foliage that remains healthy green until autumn. Some are prone to leaf spot which can defoliate a tree by mid August leaving a massive eyesore in the landscape. Some cultivars and species may never get leafspot and will be a green oasis in the sky all summer long. Canker can affect some types of Poplars killing large branches and sometimes the entire tree. Canker is like a Cancer but it attacks the wood blocking sap flow. Cankers do NOT affect all kinds of Poplar so selection is important and I tried to help with this below by listing types such as the Lombardy that are prone.
Many Poplars are short lived and susceptible to rot and become hollow after 60 years.
Young trees should be pruned to a single leader and feathered.
Pruning is best done during late winter after the threat of severe cold has passed.
Propagation is easy from winter hardwood cuttings though the true species can be reproduced from seed which is again only produced if both sex trees are present however due to the Poplars ability to easily hybridize you may not get a pure bred tree. Cuttings are preferrably taken while the tree is dormant, making an angle cut at the bottom and a flat cut at the top. The cuttings should be about 1 foot long and around 0.5 inches thick and planted 6 inches deep. Rooting generally takes a few weeks.

* photos of unknown internet source



Populus adenopoda ( Chinese Aspen )
The Chinese equivalent of Populus tremula, it can grow quite large with the largest trees recorded reaching up to 133 feet in height with trunk diameters up to 6 feet. Fast growing, it reaches an average of 50 feet in 20 years. Chinese Aspen is native to upland and mountains woods of central and eastern China.
The shallowly-toothed, ovate leaves are up to 6 x 5 inches in size. The foliage is deep green above, grayish-green beneath.
The flower catkins, up to 4 inches in length, appear during early spring.
They are followed by fruiting catkins, up to 12 inches in length, during late spring.
The smooth grayish-white bark becomes furrowed and dark gray on older trees. The wood is used for pulp, furniture and construction.
Hardy zones 5 to 9.

Populus alba ( White Poplar )
A large vigorous tree to 80 fet or more, that is native from most of Europe to central Asia; south to northern Africa. It has naturalized in eastern North America to as far north as Thunder Bay, Sault Ste Marie and Mattawa, Ontario where it is found most often on sandy roadsides. Some records include: 20 years - 115 feet; 50 years - trunk diameter of 3 feet; largest on record - 165 x 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 feet; longest lived - 264 years.
This tree can sucker heavily from the root system and is sometimes invasive.
The leaves are palmate "Maple-like" in shape with coarsely toothed edges, 3 to 5 lobes and up to a maximum size of 6 x 4 inches. The foliage is downy white when young later becoming shiny deep green above and white below, later turning to golden-yellow or rarely fiery red late in autumn.
The drooping flower catkins are borne in spring before the foliage emerges. The female catkins are green and up to 4 inches in length; the male catkins are gray with red anthers and up to 3 inches in length.
The young stems are also downy white and the bark on older trees is chalky white however on very old trees is becomes roughened and dark gray.
Hardy zones 2 to 8. it prefers soil PH from 5 to 7 and is flood tolerant and will even grow on sand dunes. Also tolerates limey soils, salt spray and drought. Rust and powdery mildew may cause early defoliation during late summer.

* photo taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario


* photos taken on August 5 2010 in Clinton, Ontario


* photo of unknown internet source

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* historical archive photos

* photos taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON


'Nivea'
Chalky white bark and foliage even more whitened beneath. Very vigorous - some records include: 4 years - 12 x 12 feet; 6 years - 18 x 17.5 feet.

'Pendula'
Weeping

'Pyramidalis'
Narrow and upright in habit. Some records include: largest on record - 125 x 67 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet.

* photos taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Major's Hill Park, Ottawa, ON


'Rocket'
Upright and columnar; reaching up 73 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet in just 22 years and eventually to a maximum of 130 feet in height.

* historic archive photo


Populus angustifolia ( Narrowleaf Cottonwood )
Also called Idaho Poplar and is closely related to Populus balsamea. A rare tree reaching up to 70 feet or more that is narrowly conical when young, with more of a dome shaped canopy as it ages. It is native to the western North America ( from southern Alberta to southwest Saskatchewan, south to central Arizona to El Paso, TX ). It is also native to the Black Hills of western South Dakota and is considered endangered in that state. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10 feet; 20 years - 60 feet; largest on record - 120 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 8.5 feet; longest lived - 200 + years. The Narrowleaf Cottonwood is rare in Canada.
The leaves, up to 7 x 1.5 inches in size are narrow lance shape with toothed margins.
The foliage is shiny bright green above and whitish-rusty beneath.
It is a "Cottonwood" but does not bear seed as abundantly as many others such as Populus deltoides. The flower catkins are up to 4 inches in length.
The slender twigs are orange-brown and sticky.
The bark on young trees is yellowish-green becoming thick, furrowed and whitish-gray on older trees.
Hardy zones 3 to 8, it mostly grows in moist river valleys in its native range and is not drought tolerant. The Narrowleaf Cottonwood prefers sandy wet soil with a PH from 6 to 7.5. Unfortunately it is canker prone. It is rarely seen in eastern North America but it has been planted at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Ontario where it thrives.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* historical archive photos


Populus x assiniboine
Reaches up to 60 x 25 feet with a semi-upright habit. Foliage turns to golden yellow in autumn. Hardy north to zone 2 and is resistant to stem cankers and leaf rust.

Populus balsamifera ( Balsam Poplar )
A large ascending tree reaching up to 100 feet or more that is the eastern counterpart to Populus trichocarpa. It is a widespread native of northern North America ( from northern Alaska to far northwestern Northwest Territories to Great Bear Lake, N.W.T. to Great Slave Lake, N.W.T. to Churchill, Manitoba to far northern Ontario to most of Labrador & Newfoundland; south to Colorado to Iowa, Wisconsin to Ohio to Massachussetts ). In the Windsor/Essex County region; it occurred sporadically on Point Pelee as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It is along with the Quaking Aspen and Paper Birch, among the most important hardwood trees of the Boreal Forest ecosystem, often as a colonizer tree forming vast forests. Often found as a colonizer, however typically on wetter sites ( including riverbanks ) than the Quaking Aspen. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10 feet; 3 years - 10 feet; 7 years - 60 feet; 20 years - 100 x 33 feet; 135 years - trunk diameter of 7 feet; largest on record - 160 x 75 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet ( Marquette MI ); longest lived - 207 years. Unfortunately the Balsam Poplar can sucker heavily so it is not recommended as an urban tree. Balsam Poplar is sometimes planted for timber in northern Europe.
The taper-pointed, oval leaves are up to 10 x 5 inches in size though sometimes as much as 13 x 10 inches on sucker shoots. The foliage is bronze when very young turning to glossy deep green above and smooth, whitish and net-veined below.
The flowers catkins up to 6 inches in length ( less - only 3 inches for male catkins ) are borne in spring before the foliage emerges.
The Balsam Poplar sheds massive amounts of "Cotton" when in seed.
Fragrant resin coats young foliage, twigs and buds.
The twigs are orange. The bark on young trees is orangish-pink and smooth, later turning to beige or gray and fissured. The wood weighs around 25 pounds per square foot.
Hardy zones 1 to 8, preferring continental climates and tolerating as low as -80 F and as high as 110 F. The Balsam Poplar can also tolerate as much as 2 months submersion in water during the winter dormant season. A beautiful tree in cold climates, foliage Rust can easily turn foliage on trees in mild regions into an eyesore during summer.

* photo taken in Clarksville, MD

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Apr 26 2013 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on Oct 22 2013 in Towson, MD

* historical archive photos

* photos taken on July 24 2015 in Goderich, ON

* photos taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON


'Jackii'
Broadly oval in habit.
Hardy north to zone 2. Drought tolerant.

'Mohave'
Grayish white lighter colored bark

Populus berkarensis ( Kazakhstan White Poplar )
A large, deciduous tree native to a single mountainous locality in Karatau in Kazakhstan that is very similar to Populus alba. It is critically endangered and less than 50 trees remain in the wild.
The foliage somewhat resembles that of the Liriodendron being squarred and very shallowly-lobed.
The bark on younger trunks is very white.
Hardy zones 4 to 8, it is likely very drought tolerant. Of superior drought tolerance, this may make a good candidate for shelterbelt projects on the U.S. Great Plains.

* excellent photo link found on internet
http://www.fotomontaro.com/flora/salica/populus_berkarensis.shtml

Populus x berolinensis ( Berlin Poplar )
A narrowly-columnar tree reaching well over 100 feet, that is the hybrid between Populus laurifolia & Populus nigra 'Italica'. Some records include: 20 years - 73 x 20 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet; largest on record - 150 x 55 feet with a trunk diameter of 4.7 feet. Three trees planted at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada have all exceeded 75 feet.
The leaves, up to 5 x 2 inches in size, are rhomboidal and pointed with serrate edges.
The foliage is glossy deep green, pale gray-green beneath; turning bright yellow during autumn.
The leaves move constantly in the breeze making a sound every bit as relaxing and enjoyable in summer as a running water fountain.
The young stems are downy light brown. The bark on older trees is deeply furrowed up to about 15 feet, them smooth and pale grayish-white above that.
Hardy zones 2 to 8, thriving in continental climates with hot summers and cold winters such as the northern Great Plains. Drought tolerant. It may be prone to early leaf drop in many locations despite being otherwise drought tolerant for a Poplar.

* photos taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON


Populus 'Canam'
Rapid growing and narrow upright in habit reaching up to 60 x 15 feet. It rarely suckers and is highly recommended for use in shelterbelts in the Great Plains.
The leaves are small, up to 3 inches.
It is NOT prone to diseases or dieback and is drought resistant.

Populus x canadensis ( Hybrid Poplar )
A group of large trees exceeding 80 feet that are the hybrids between Populus deltoides & P. nigra. Some records include: 2 years - 33 x 7 feet; 10 years - 60 x 27 feet; 85 years - trunk diameter of 6.6 feet; largest on record - 180 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 13 feet. Some trees exceed 150 years in age. It has reached 100 feet at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.
The triangular leaves, up to 8 x 6 inches ( typically half that ) with sparsely toothed edges are borne in red stalks. The leaves move constantly in the breeze making a sound every bit as relaxing and enjoyable in summer as a running water fountain.
The flower catkins are up to 9 inches in length.
The bark is light gray with deep vertical fissures.
Hardy zones 2 to 7. Prefers cool light soil.

* photos taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

* historic archive photos


'Aurea'
Golden yellow new foliage ages to yellow-green.
Reaches a maximum size of 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet. Some records include: 80 years - 100 x 100 feet; 90 years - 112 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet.

* photos taken on July 26 2015 @ Niagara Falls Botanical Gardens, Niagara Falls, ON


'Eugenei'
Columnar in habit, reaching a maximum height of 123 feet. Some records include: 2 years - 33 x 6.6 feet; largest on record - 183 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet. Foliage is bronze at first in spring before turning to green. Resistant to canker.

* historic archive photo


'Gelrica'
Whitish bark and red shoots. Reaches up to 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet in 50 years, eventually more.

'Imperial'
Disease free

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.


'Marilandica'
Reaches up to 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet in 110 years. Tallest on record is 133 feet.
The pale gray bark is irregularly and deeply ridged and furrowed.

'Prairie Sky'
A very fast growing ( up to 26 x 12 feet in 5 years ), columnar form reaching up to 80 + x 12 feet that originated in Manitoba, Canada. This male clone does not produce "cotton" and the glossy green foliage turns to an attractive golden-yellow in autumn. Long lived and resistant to stem canker and leaf rust. Hardy north to zone 2b, extremely hardy, it thrives even in Alberta.

'Robusta'
Strongly upright, columnar and very vigorous in habit with dense foliage . Some records include: 10 years - 60 x 27 feet; largest on record - 160 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The foliage, up to 7 x 6 inches emerges red-bronze in mid spring later maturing glossy deep green.
The bark is gray and vertically ridged.

* photo taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON


'Serotina' ( Italian Poplar )
A male non fruiting clone that is very vigorous, open and conical in habit. Reaches up to 110 feet in height and 9.5 feet in trunk diameter. Growth rate: 200 years - 133 feet in height with trunk diameter of 8 feet. It has reached 70 feet at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.
Foliage is late to emerge in spring at which time it is orange to bronze, later turning to gray-green.
Though pollarding of trees usually does nothing but annoy me, this tree is better than most for that purpose.

'Serotina Aurea'
A male non-fruiting form wiht foliage that emerges striking bright yellow late in spring. Some records include: largest on record - 130 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 feet.

'Spike'
A male clone forming no "cotton" that is hardy north to zone 2 and is resistant to leaf spot and rust. It can reach up to 100 feet in height and is known to reach as large as 64 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 inches in just 7 years.

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.


Populus x candicans ( Ontario Poplar )
A very large fast growing tree that is the natural hybrid between Populus balsamifera & P. deltoides. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 17 feet; 2 years - 33 x 10 feet; 12 years - 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 21 inches ( ‘Beaupré’ - Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides ); largest on record - 200 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 8 feet. Suckering on some sites may limit its use.
The broadly oval to often heart shaped, taper pointed leaves are up to 8 x 5 inches in size ( rarely up to 11 x 10 inches in vigorous shoots ).
The foliage is deep blue green above, whitish and net veined beneath.
The buds and young twigs are red-brown and very resinous
The flowers are female only and are borne in drooping catkins up to 7 inches in length that appear before the emerging foliage in spring.
The bark on young trees is orange-brown and smooth, becoming ridged with age.
Hardy zones 2 to 6 and flood tolerant. Unfortunately it is very prone to canker disease typically limiting its life expectancy to 50 years.

* historical archive photos


'Aurea'
Foliage is heavily variegated creamy-white and pink. Foliage is best on trees that are pollarded. Maximum height of 70 feet.

'Gileadensis' ( Balm of Gilead )
Larger than usual foliage, up to 11 x 10 inches on vigorous shoots.
It has reached 100 feet at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada and will likely eventually exceed that.

'Imperial'
Insect and disease resistant.

Populus x canescens ( Gray Poplar )
A very fast growing, broadly-columnar large tree reaching up to 100 feet that is the natural hybrid between Populus alba & Populus tremula. It is found in floodplains in most of Europe except the far north and south. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 7 feet; 20 years - 60 feet ( avg ); largest on record - 170 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 10.1 feet; longest lived - 214 years. A tree of 166 feet has been reported to grow in Hungary. It has reached 60 x 40 feet at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada. This hybrid often grows much larger than either of its parents and develops a high rounded canopy.
The leaves up to 3 x 3 inches, are oval to triangular in shape and are toothed at the edge. The leaves are downy whitish at first turning to glossy deep green above and gray felted beneath turning to bronze during autumn.
The drooping flower catkins are up to 4 inches in length. The female catkins are green, the male catkins have red anthers.
The bark is pale yellow-gray and smooth in young trees turning to dark brown and deeply furrowed in older trees.
Hardy zones 2 to 7 and is very disease resistant.

* photo taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON

* photos taken on Sep 18 2016 @ Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, MD


'Macrophylla'
Much larger foliage ( sometimes to as much as 10 inches in length ) that turns reddish in autumn. Much more vigorous and is known to reach as large as 105 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet in just 24 years.

'Tower'
Very fast growing ( up to 15.5 x 6 feet in 5 years ), long lived, dense columnar in habit. The leaves are glossy gray-green above and furry, white beneath. Resistant to canker and makes an excellent narrow shelterbelt tree.
Extremely hardy, it thrives even in Alberta.

'WSISI'
Narrow in habit, it looks half like a columnar Populus alba and half Swedish Aspen.
Extremely vigorous, it can reach as much as 37 x 12 feet in 5 years.
Exceptionally hardy, it is valuable for use in shelterbelts in the northern Great Plains including Alberta.

Populus caspica ( Caspian Popular )
Also called Populus alba var caspica. A deciduous large tree, reaching up to 100 feet, that is very similar to Populus alba except native to central Asia ( from the Caucasus to central Asia; south to Iran to Afghanistan to Pakistan.

Populus cathayana
A fast growing, large tree reaching up to 100 feet or more, that is native to Korea and surrounding parts of China including Manchuria. Some records include: 20 years - 82 feet; largest on record - 136 x 40 + feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The leaves are narrowly oval to heart shaped, up to 10 x 3 inches in size though much smaller on older shoots.
The foliage is glossy green above and white felted beneath.
The flower catkins reach up to 8 inches in length.
The young stems are green at first then turning to orange then finally light gray.
Hardy zones 3 to 9, it is prone to canker in maritime climates such as in Europe.

Populus ciliata ( Himalayan Poplar )
A strong growing, broad-crowned, large, deciduous tree native to India and Pakistan at elevations less than 10 000 feet. Some records include: first year - 5 feet; largest on record - 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.2 feet.
The leaves are ovate, up to 7 x 5 inches, on stalks up to 5 inches in length.
The flower catkins are up to 9 ( rarely 12 ) inches in length.
The bark is greenish-gray and smooth at first, later becoming deep brown and deeply fissured.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 ( tolerating -4 F ) does grow well in cool summer climates with not too harsh winters, it thrives in England where it can reach up to 63 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.5 feet in just 22 years, eventually much more.

* excellent photo link
http://www.asianflora.com/Salicaceae/Populus-ciliata.htm

Populus deltoides ( Eastern Cottonwood )
A very large, massive, dome shaped tree often exceeding 100 feet that is native to a huge portion of eastern North America ( from eastern North Dakota to central Wisconsin to Manitoulin Island to Barrie, Ontario to Ottawa, Ontario to southeast Quebec to Massachusets; south to central Texas to far northern Florida...it is absent from the Appalachian Mountains ). in the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it was common throughout the region as well as the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It was also abundant at Detroit, Michigan during that time, it remains abundant there to this day. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 20 feet; 2 years - 40 x 10 feet with a trunk diameter of 7 inches; 3 years - 43 feet; 5 years - 60 feet; 9 years - 105 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet; 20 years - 115 feet; 30 years - 120 feet; 60 years - 190 feet; 70 years - trunk diameter of 6 feet; largest on record - 220 x 115 feet with a trunk diameter of 12 feet; longest lived - 400 years. The Eastern Cottonwood does not normally sucker from the roots.
The leaves are round to triangular in shape with coarsely toothed edges. They reach a maximum size of 10 x 10 inches though are more typically half that on older shoots.
The foliage is smooth and lustrous deep green above, light green below and turns to golden-yellow in autumn though many trees drop their leaves early due to drought or leaf rust fungus.
The leaves move constantly in the breeze making a sound every bit as relaxing and enjoyable in summer as a running water fountain.
The flower catkins are up to 8 inches in length. This tree often releases copious amounts of "cotton" as the seeds mature in early summer.
The new leaves, buds and young shoots are covered in a sticky resin that is balsam scented, eventually this wears away.
The bark on young trees and upper branches is greenish-yellow and smooth.
The bark on older trees is dark gray and roughly ridged and furrowed.
The wood weighs 24 pounds per square foot.
Hardy zones 2 to 9 tolerating as low as -50 F and as high as 115 F. It is very soil tolerant thriving with soil PH ranging from 4.5 to 8. Tolerant of both months of flooding flooding during dormant season as well as summer drought. On dry sites, the Eastern Cottonwood may drop its leaves early, even in August.

* photo from family photo album taken July 1969 in Amherstburg, Ontario

* photo from family photo album taken in the Canard River Valley near Amherstburg, Ontario - this tree was sadly turned to splinters during the July 1998 tornado


* photo of unknown internet source

* photo taken on August 2 2010 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photo taken on August 5 2010 in Clinton, Ontario


* large trees in Southern Ontario, Canada ( not incl. Canard Valley tree in above photo ) - Grand Ave. W., Chatham, ON - 120 feet w 9 ft. trunk diam.; Aylmer, ON - 140 feet w 7 ft. trunk diam.; Southwold, Elgin Co., ON - 100 feet w 9 ft. trunk diam.

* video found on Youtube - Ohio's largest tree

* photos taken on July 30 2013 in Grand Bend, Ontario

* photo taken on Aug 15 2014 @ Druid Hill Park, Baltimore, MD

* photos taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON

* photo taken on April 1971 in Amherstburg, Ontario

* photos taken on Apr 1973 in Amherstburg, Ontario
* photos taken on Jan 1978 in Amherstburg, Ontario

* photo taken on July 1989 in Amherstburg, Ontario

* photo taken on June 1 1991 in Amherstburg, Ontario

* photos taken on July 17 2016 in Blyth, ON

* photo taken on July 18 2016 in Grand Bend, ON

* photo taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Major's Hill Park, Ottawa, ON

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photos


'Colmar'
A male non-seeding clone that is resistant to leaf diseases. The foliage turns to golden-yellow in autumn.

'Noreaster'
Very fast growing and canker resistant.

'Purple Tower'
Similar to species, except for larger leaves ( avg 8 inches ) that are rich deep reddish-black at first, later turning to deep purplish-green with deep red stalks, midribs and veins. The intensely colored new foliage continues to be produced all season long. The foliage turns to deep golden-orange during autumn.

* photos taken by Milan Havlis, owner of central Europe's premier plant nursery


'Siouxland'
Resistant to leaf rust and is strong wooded resisting storms.

'Skyfest'
An upright, vigorous, male non-fruiting clone that reaches 80 + x 30 feet in size. It is very disease resistant and hardy north to zone 2.

Populus euphratica ( Euphrates Poplar )
Also called Mesopotamian Poplar. An attractive, large fast growing tree native to western Asia ( from northern Turkey to western Iran to the Caucasus to southern Mongolia; south Iraq into India ). It once formed vast floodplain forests in the Euphrates delta region but is now rare. Some records include: largest on record - 100 x 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet. The Euphrates Poplar resembled P. deltoides in appearance.
It is very useful for subtropical forestry and is only now becoming popular for that cause. It even withstands soil pollution and its roots remove toxins.
It coppices very well but doing this will cause it to sucker heavily however making it an excellent firewood source in developing regions.
The toothed, oval to triangular leaves are up to 6 x 5 inches in size. The luxuriant green foliage turns to golden-yellow during autumn.
The flower catkins, up to 6 inches in length, are borne during late spring.
The bark is grayish-brown.
Among the most hardy of all trees; it is hardy from zones 6 to 11 ( some seed source is less hardy...Mongolian seed source hardy to zone 3 ) and tolerates drought and temperatures as high as 124 F. It is very salt tolerant and even tolerates brackish water. Euphrates Poplar requires an average yearly rainfall exceeding 30 inches unless on a site with permanent high water table. It is disease resistant.

* excellent photo link found here
http://www.biolib.cz/en/taxonimage/id57462/

Populus fremontii ( Fremont Cottonwood )
A very fast growing, large, stocky, dome shaped tree reaching over 80 feet, that is native to the western U.S. from northern California to Colorado; south to the Baja Peninsula to western Texas and northern Mexico. Some records include: 4 days from seed - 2 inches; 10 years - 65 feet; largest on record - 155 x 97 feet with a trunk diameter of 14.8 feet; longest lived - 267 years. It have even been reports of growth rates as high as 30 feet on young trees. The Fremont Cottonwood grows surprisingly well in the much cooler summers of the British Isles and is known to have reaches 110 feet with a trunk diameter over 3 feet in Dublin, Ireland.
The broad-based, triangular leaves taper abruptly to a point, are coarsely-toothed and up to 6 x 4 inches in size. This Poplar does not form resin on its new foliage and twigs unlike related Populus deltoides. The foliage is shiny green with a yellow midrib above and turns to golden-yellow during autumn. The foliage often persists late in fall and may be nearly evergreen during mild winters.
The flower catkins reach up to 5 inches in length. The female trees often produce massive quantities of "cotton" as the seeds mature.
The bark on young trees is gray-brown, thin and smooth. On older trees the bark becomes thick, red-brown and deeply furrowed.
The root system on the Fremont Cottonwood is massive and roots as deep as 17 feet have been recorded.
Hardy zones 2 to 9 and is very heat tolerant.

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* photo taken by G.L. Clothier @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photos


Populus grandidentata ( Bigtooth Aspen )
A tall narrow rounded crowned tree reaching around 75 feet that is native to eastern North America ( from southeast Manitoba to Sioux Lookout to Lake Nipigon to Cochrane, Ontario to Gaspe and Cape Breton Island of Nova Scotia; south to Iowa to Tennessee to Virginia ). It is very common in the north. In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it occurred sporadically around Amherstburg, Point Pelee, the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s. It was abundant on the Ohio shore during that time. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10 feet; 2 years - 12 feet; 3 years - 15 feet; 20 years - 70 feet; 50 years - trunk diameter of 3 feet; largest on record - 140 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet; longest lived - 150 years. It has reached 75 feet at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada. The root system is generally very wide and shallow.
The leaves are rounded, to 7 x 7 inches ( less than half that on older growth ) and range from sharply toothed on younger shoots to wavy edged on older shoots.
The foliage emerges late and silky-white, turning to deep green with a yellow midrib above, paler green beneath and then turning golden-yellow to orange in autumn.
The flower catkins, up to 3 inches in length, are borne in early spring before the foliage emerges.
The bark is smooth and pale green on young trees and becomes furrowed and brown on old trees. The wood weighs around 29 pounds per square foot.
Hardy zones 2 to 9 in full sun and preferring moist sandy soil. It thrives in Edmonton, Alberta though not native there. The Bigtooth Aspen does not like clay however it is resistant to leaf spot.

* photo taken on Aug 3 2011 in Luzerne Co, PA

* photo of unknown internet source

* photos taken on Oct 17 2013 in Olney, MD

* photos taken on Sep 19 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, ON

* photos taken on July 16 2016 in Goderich, ON

* historical archive photos


'Sabre' ( Sabre Aspen )
A very fast growing ( up to 17 x 10.5 feet in 5 years ), narrow, round headed tree with nice smooth, gray-green bark and coarse, large leaves. The attractive, deep green foliage flutters in the wind and turns intense golden-yellow during autumn. It eventually becomes a large shade tree with a balanced branching structure that is sturdier than average. This clone does not produce seed or cotton.
Hardy zones 2a to 6. Recommended for the northern Great Plains, especially Edmonton.
It is drought tolerant and somewhat urban tolerant.

Populus heterophylla ( Swamp Cottonwood )
A rare, fast growing, narrow round canopied tree reaching up to 100 feet. It is native to riverbanks and swamps in the Mississippi Valley region where widespread north to Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and southern Michigan ( recently, a population was discovered on a clay plain near Lake St. Clair in Essex County, Ontario, Canada in 2007 ). It occurred sporadically along the Ohio shore during the 1800s. It also occurs naturally on the Gulfcoast and the eastern seaboard north to Connecticut. It is endangered in Michigan, Ontario, Ohio, Alabama, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware and New York State where it occurs north to Ulster County. Nearly all remaining trees of this species in Ontario are in Bickford Woods Conservation northwest of Chatham...the last remaining large track of swampy clay plain forest that use to be the Great Swamp that ran along Hwy 401 from east of Windsor to Chatham and north to Wallaceburg. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 6 + feet; 20 years - 50 + feet; largest on record - 140 x 110 feet with a trunk diameter of 9 feet.
The blunt tipped leaves are rounded with rounded teeth, up to 10 x 8 inches and generally hang down from the stems. The leaves are the same size on both vigorous and older shoots unlike most Poplar. The foliage is deep green with a yellow midrib above and paler green beneath. The young foliage and buds are coated in resin that eventually wears off. The luxuriant foliage of the Swamp Cottonwood is much more attractive than that of the much more abundant Populus deltoides.
Older female trees shed copious amounts of "cotton" as the seeds mature in early summer.
The red-brown bark on old trees is scaly and shaggy.
The wood weighs around 25 pounds per square foot.
The wood is valuable for paper pulp. Hardy zones 4 to 9 and requires hot summers and prefers acidic soil with a PH from 4.6 to 6. It is very clay tolerant and tolerates swampy sites.

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo of unknown internet source

* historical archive photos


Populus hyrcana ( Caspian Poplar )
A medium-sized, deciduous tree, that is native to the Caucasus; south to northern Turkey and western Iran.
The very attractive foliage is woolly silvery-white to pale green.
Hardy zones 6 to 8, it is very tolerant of heat and drought and also disease resistant.

Populus ilicifolia ( Tana River Poplar)
An evergreen tree reaching up to 100 feet in height with a trunk diameter of 5 feet that is native to Kenya and Tanzania. It is threatened by habitat loss in its natural range.

Populus koreana ( Korean Poplar )
A very attractive, fast growing, broadly-columnar, large tree to 80 feet or more that related to Populus maximowiczii and native from the Ussuri Region of Siberia to Korea. Some records include: largest on record - 100 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet. It has reached 35 feet in 10 years at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.
The large leaves are up to 9 x 4 inches in size. The leathery foliage is vivid green with red veins above; white beneath.
Hardy zones 3 to 6, unfortunately prone to canker disease. It is easily propagated by sticking long shoots into the soil immediately after the leaves fall during mid to late autumn.

Populus lasiocarpa ( Chinese Necklace Poplar )
A vigorous, broadly conical to rounded crowned tree reaching around 65 feet that is native to southwest China.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 5 feet; 10 years - 27 x 10 feet; 20 years - 60 feet; largest on record - 90 x 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 3.5 feet.
The very large, broadly ovate to heart shaped, leathery leaves are up to 15 x 10 inches in size. The minutely serrate edged leaves are borne on long red stalks up to 8 inches in length. They are downy on both sides at first turning to deep green with red veins above and downy beneath. The foliage does not color much before dropping during autumn. Hot dry winds can damage the foliage.
The yellow-green flower catkins are up to 12 inches in length. The male catkins have red anthers.
The young stems are very stout and have a woolly coating.
The bark is beige and vertically fissured.
Hardy zones 3 to 9.

* historic archive photo


Populus laurifolia ( Laurel Poplar )
A spreading to domed, large tree reaching up to 100 feet or more, that is native to riverbanks from Siberia; south to northern India to northwestern China to northern Mongolia. Some records include: 10 years - 36 feet with a trunk diameter of 1 foot; largest on record - 150 feet. It has reached 50 feet at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.
The toothed, lance-shaped leaves, up to 5 x 3 inches in size, are borne on long stalks. The foliage is glossy mid-green above and white hairy beneath.
Hardy zones 2 to 7, it thrives on the northern Great Plains and has been fully hardy in trials at Brandon, Manitoba.

Populus maximowiczii ( Japanese Poplar )
A very attractive, tall, massive, deciduous tree to 100 feet or more that is native to eastern Siberia ( Amur River basin ), Sakhalin, Japan, Korea and surrounding parts of China. Some records include: 12 years - 100 feet; largest on record - 165 x 70 feet with a trunk diameter of 6.5 feet. Long-lived for a Poplar, persisting as long as 300 years. One Populus maximowiczii x trichocarpa hybrid was reported to have a growth rate of 15 feet!
When young they are narrow and columnar, older trees become billowing, massive spreaders.
The somewhat wrinkled, broad-oblong to elliptical leaves are sharply pointed often with a twisted tip. The leathery leaves, up to 6 x 5 inches in size, are very deep green with red veins above, bright green beneath. The attractive foliage appears early in spring and turns intense glowing golden-yellow late in autumn.
The young twigs are hairy and red.
Hardy zones 3 to 7, this tough tree is very pollution tolerant. Unfortunately the Japanese Poplar can be prone to cankers as is the related Populus balsamifera.

Populus nigra ( Black Poplar )
A fast growing large massive tree reaching up to 100 feet or more, that is a widespread native from Europe to western Asia, south into northern Africa. It is extinct in its native Holland due to hybridization and loss of its floodplain forests natural habitat. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 8 feet; 10 years - 52 feet with a trunk diameter of 1.3 feet; 20 years - 100 x 33 feet; 28 years - 105 feet; 100 years - trunk diameter of 5.5 feet; largest on record - 160 x 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 12 feet ( Yugoslavia ). Rarely seen in North America, it has reached 60 feet at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada. It is moderately long-lived, up to 214 years.
The leaves are triangular, up to 8 x 8 inches though usually half that on older shoots.
The foliage is often maroon red at first turning to glossy deep green above and light green beneath, turning to brilliant yellow late in autumn.
The leaves move constantly in the breeze making a sound every bit as relaxing and enjoyable in summer as a running water fountain.
The flowers are borne in catkins up to 3 inches in length in early spring before the foliage emerges. The female flowers are green and the male flowers have red anthers.
The male trees release massive amounts of "cotton" as their seed ripen.
The often gnarled and knotted massive trunk has bark that is deeply fissured and brown to gray ( whitish in 'Elegans' ). The young twigs are downy.
Hardy zones 3 to 9 ( varies with seed source ). Very pollution tolerant. Black Poplar requires an average yearly rainfall exceeding 26 inches.

* photo taken on August 3 2010 @ University of Guelph Arboretum, Ontario

* photo taken on August 4 2010 near Stratford, Ontario

* photo of unknown internet source

* historical archive photos


'Afghanica'
Reaches up to 72 feet with a trunk diameter of 20 inches in 28 years, eventually reaches up to 85 feet or more.

* historical archive photo


'Betulifolia'
A natural subspecies in England where it is endangered. Grows equal size to species. The shoots and leaf stalks are downy unlike that of the species.
Hardy north to zone 2.

'Italica' ( Lombardy Poplar )
Very narrow and columnar in habit. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10 feet; 2 years - 12 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 inches; 10 years - 70 x 10 feet; largest on record - 160 x 65 feet with a trunk diameter of 12 feet. Unfortunately except for cold dry climates, it is very prone to canker which kills the crown, often on trees less than 20 years of age.
The foliage is often very intense golden-yellow in autumn. The young twigs are orange.

* photos of unknown internet source



* photo taken by E.S. Shipp @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photos


'Plantierensis'
Similar to 'Italica'

* photo of unknown internet source


Populus occidentalis ( Plains Cottonwood )
A large massive spreading tree reaching around 80 feet that is closely related to Populus deltoides but is found naturally further to the west in the Great Plains along stream banks ( from near Edmonton, Alberta to central Saskatchewan to central Manitoba to Kenora and Rainy River, Ontario; south to central Texas and southwest Oklahoma ). It is endangered in Ontario. Some records include: fastest growth rate - 12 feet; 10 years - 65 feet; 35 years - trunk diameter of 3 feet; largest on record - 120 x 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 12 feet. It does not sucker. Plains Cottonwood can be moderately long-lived on ideal sites, persisting as long as 370 years. Rarely cultivated in eastern North America, it has reached 60 x 50 feet at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.
The leaves, up to 5 x 4 inches are sharply pointed and have much fewer teeth than that of Populus deltoides. It also has downy buds unlike Populus deltoides.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 tolerating as low as -50 F yet also being very heat tolerant.

* photos of unknown internet source




* photos taken on Jul 18 2017 @ Dominion Arboretum, Ottawa, ON

* historical archive photos


Populus pilosa
A small tree, reaching a maximum height of 50 feet, that is native to river valleys of western and northern Mongolia as well as Xinjiang Province in northwestern China.
The minutely-toothed, broadly-ovate to nearly rounded leaves, up to 3.2 x 2.5 inches in size. The foliage is mid-green above, whitish beneath.
The flower catkins appear during late spring.
Hardy zones 2 to 6.

Populus pruinosa ( Chinese Aspen )
A very attractive, rounded, medium-size, deciduous tree reaching up to 50 feet that is native to river banks in the desert region of central Asia ( from Iran to Kazakhstan to far western China; south to Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan ) where it is endangered. The largest on record is 66 x 66 feet.
The leathery, smooth-edged, kindney-shaped leaves are small, up to 1.6 x 2 inches in size.
The bark is gray-white.
It is hardy zones 3 to 7, tolerant of temperatures from -40 to 110 F. Very drought tolerant but does not tolerate salt ( some reports do claim it tolerant of saline soils - more testing needed ).

Populus sieboldii ( Japanese Aspen )
Native to northern & central Japan and reaching a maximum height of 80 feet; the Japanese Aspen is much more often found as a much shorter clump of suckering trunks.
The toothed, ovate to triangular leaves are up to 3.3 x 3 inches in size. The foliage is glossy deep green above and downy white beneath. The bark is grayish-white.
Hardy zones 4 to 9

* excellent photo link found here
http://www.biolib.cz/en/taxonimage/id189193/

Populus simonii ( Simon Poplar )
A tall tree to 75 feet with a narrow crown and pendulous branch tips that is native to far eastern Mongolia, northwest & north-central China and Manchuria. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10 feet; 65 years - trunk diameter of 4.2 feet; largest on record - 100 x 66 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet. It has reached 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet at Dominion Arboretum in Ottawa, Canada.
The ovate to oval leaves are up to 5 x 3.2 inches in size. The foliage is luxuriant mid-green above, bright green beneath.
The young twigs are red tinted.
The bark is smooth and grayish-green, becoming flat furrowed and dark gray on old trees. Hardy zones 2 to 6 and is an excellent tree for use in the Canadian Prairie Provinces where it is not as disease prone.

* photos taken on July 25 2015 @ Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

* historic archive photos


'Fastigiata
Narrow and columnar in form; otherwise similar to species.

* photos taken on July 26 2015 @ Niagara Parks Bot. Gardens, Niagara Falls, ON

* excellent photo link found here
http://www.biolib.cz/en/taxonimage/id118511/

'Pendula'
A very attractive large tree with weeping branches. It is more canker resistant than the species.

Populus suaveolens ( Kamchatka Balsam Poplar )
Also called Populus balsamifera var. suaveolens. A large tree reaching up to 100 x 60 feet ( 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet has been recorded in 40 years ), that is native from eastern Siberia to Kamchatka; south to most of northern Mongolia, north-central China and Korea. It makes a great street tree for cold climates and is also used in forestry plantations for timber and pulp within its native range.
The leathery, oblong leaves are up to 7 x 2.5 inches in size.
The bark is smooth and grayish-green; becoming furrowed and gray on older trees. The twigs are grayish-brown. Hardy zones 3 to 6 ( likely 2 for Mongolian seed source ), it thrives on the northern Great Plains.

Populus szechuanica ( Tibetan Poplar )
A tall tree native to western China reaching 100 feet or more. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10 feet; 20 years - 82 x 33 feet; largest on record - 135 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet.
The toothed, ovate to heart shaped leaves reach up to 12 x 10 inches though usually much less on older shoots. The red leafstalks are long, up to 4 inches in length. The foliage is reddish at first turning smooth and deep green with reddish veins above, silvery white beneath. Fall color is not significant.
The young stems are reddish and sharply angled.
The bark is pinkish-gray; late becoming gray-white and cracking into larrge, flat flakes.
Hardy zones 4 to 9. Easy to grow but may not enjoy a site with excessive wind.

Populus tadshikistanica ( Tajikstan Cottonwood )
A slightly-weeping, medium-sized, decidous tree, that is native to Tajikstan in central Asia where it is endangered.
The crenate, ovate leaves are up to 2 x 1.6 inches in size.
The twigs are downy.
Hardy zones 5 to 8. It is heat and pollution tolerant.

Populus tomentosa ( Chinese White Poplar )
A vigorous large handsome tree reaching around 100 feet that is native to northern China where common. Some records include: largest on record - 135 x 55 feet with a trunk diameter of 3 feet.
The leaves are larger than Populus alba, up to 9 inches long and appear early in spring and persist very late in autumn.
Hardy north to zone 3, though very rare in North America it is also very disease resistant.

Populus tremula ( Swedish Aspen )
A common tree with a rounded spreading crown, reaching up to 70 feet or more. Swedish Aspen ranges widely through the Boreal Forests from northwest Europe east to Siberia, south into mountains of southern Europe to Kazakhstan to northwest China to most of Mongolia. It is found only in high mountains south of central Europe. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 10 feet; 20 years - 50 feet ( avg ); largest on record - 170 x 30 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet; longest lived - 180 years ( on 133 foot tree in Poland ).
The leaves are rounded with wavy edges, up to 5 x 4 inches in size. The foliage is finely hairy and bronze at first becoming smooth and gray-green above and lighter beneath. The foliage turns into a spectacular show of yellow, orange and red late in autumn. The leaves move constantly in the breeze making a sound every bit as relaxing and enjoyable in summer as a running water fountain.
The drooping flower catkins appear before the foliage very early in spring.
The females are green and the males have red anthers.
The bark on young trees is gray and smooth, later becoming darker and ridged on the lower portion of the trunk.
Hardy zones 1 to 5 and prefers light sandy soils in full sun. The Swedish Aspen is very prone to leaf spot in the Midwest and defoliates in July. It is not prone from Minnesota to Mass. and north.

* excellent videos found on youtube


'Erecta'
Columnar in habit like the Lombardy Poplar. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 9 feet; 3 years - 22 x 3 feet; 10 years - 40 feet; largest on record - 90 x 21 feet with a trunk diameter of 2.5 feet.

* photos taken on July 26 2015 @ Niagara Falls Botanical Gardens, Niagara Falls, ON


'Pendula' ( Weeping Aspen )
Pendulus in habit. Some records include: 10 years - 33 x 27 feet; largest on record - 66 feet.

* historic archive photos


'Purpurea'
Purple tinged foliage that turns to red in autumn.

'Tapiau'
Very vigorous with growth rates up to 7 feet or more!

Populus tremuloides ( Quaking Aspen )
The North American counterpart to Populus tremula reaching up to 70 feet or more and ranging widely through the Boreal Forests ( from northern Alaska to far northwest Northwest Territories to Great Bear Lake, N.W.T. to Great Slave Lake, N.W.T. to far northern Ontario to Labrador & Newfoundland, south to northern California to Colorado to Iowa to central Ohio to New Jersey ). In the Windsor/Essex County, Ontario region; it occurred sporadically around Amherstburg and Point Pelee and more abundantly on the Lake Erie islands during the 1800s. It was abundant at Detroit, Michigan during that time.
Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 9 feet; 10 years - 60 x 33 feet; largest on record - 144 x 50 feet with a trunk diameter of 6 feet; largest in North Dakota - 70 feet; longest lived - 460 ( very rarely over 200 ) years. The root system is typically very wide and shallow.
The leaves are rounded with serrated edges. The foliage is glossy deep green above and glaucous blue beneath, turning to golden-yellow in autumn.
The leaves move constantly in the breeze making a sound every bit as relaxing and enjoyable in summer as a running water fountain.
The flower catkins up to 3.5 inches in length are borne in early spring before the foliage emerges.
The bark is greenish gray on young trees later turing to white and smooth with dark scars. Very old trees are coarsely ridged and gray on the lower portion of the trunk.
The wood weighs around 25 pounds per square foot.
Hardy zones 0 to 6 tolerating as low as -314 F!!!

* photos of unknown internet source





* photo taken on July 30 2013 in Grand Bend, Ontario

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos taken on July 27 2015 in Bayfield, Ontario

* photos taken on July 14 2016 in Tobermory, ON

* photo taken on Jul 19 2017 @ Major's Hill Park, Ottawa, ON

* photo taken by E.S. Shipp @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* historical archive photos

* excellent videos found on youtube


'Mountain Sentinel'
Narrow columnar in habit, reaching up to 40 x 8 feet.
The foliage is intense golden-yellow during autumn.


'Pikes Bay'
Canker resistant with white bark

'Prairie Gold'
Originates in northeast Nebraska and thrives in heat and humidity as well as being resistant to the typical Aspen scourges of canker, leaf spot and borers in the Midwest.

Populus trichocarpa ( Black Cottonwood )
A massive spreading tree reaching up to 150 feet or more, that is native to the Pacific Northwest ( from coastal Alaska to central Alberta; south to central California, Idaho and southwest Montana ). It is sometimes used in forestry plantations in western Europe. Some records include: fastest recorded growth rate - 8 feet; first year - 6 feet; 9 years - 50 x 17 feet with a trunk diameter of 10 inches; 20 years - 115 feet; 30 years - 120 feet with a trunk diameter of 5 feet; largest on record - 275 x 60 feet with a trunk diameter of 12 feet; largest in Europe - 7.5 foot trunk diameter; longest lived - 400 years.
The oval to rounded, shallowly tooth-edged leaves are up to 16 x 10.5 inches on vigorous shoots but are usually closer to half that. The foliage is deep glossy green above and pale brown to almost white beneath, turning to golden-yellow in autumn. The Black Cottonwood is one of the first trees to leaf out in spring and one of the last to loose them in autumn.
Female trees produce copious amounts of "cotton" as the seeds ripen.
The branches are brittle. The bark is silvery-yellow on young trees, later becoming gray and furrowed.
Hardy zones 2 to 8 tolerating as low as -53 F. Can be prone to canker disease in mild climates.

* photo taken by Jean Pawek @ CalPhotos

* historical archive photos

* video found on youtube


'Fritz Pauley'
A male clone that does not produce "cotton".
Some records include: 13 years - trunk diameter of 1.3 feet; 28 years - 112 feet.
The foliage is glossy deep green above and very silvery beneath. Canker resistant.

A hybrid between P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides was reported to have a growth rate of 13 feet and leaves up to 12 x 10 inches.

Populus tristis ( Siberian Poplar )
A shrubby tree native to the Boreal Forest regions of Russia.
The rounded leaves, up to 5 x 2 inches in size, are black-green above and white beneath.
Hardy zones 1 to 5, tolerating as low as - 80 F

Populus violescens
Very similar to Populus lasiocarpa but with smaller, ovate leaves reaching a maximum length of 9 inches. The leafstalks, young foliage and veins on older foliage are violet-red. Some records include: 25 years - 71 feet with a trunk diameter of 17 inches; 40 years - 90 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 feet. This tree is unlikely to grow much taller however might reach up to 4 feet in trunk diameter with extreme age.
The furrowed bark is dark gray. The twigs are yellowish-brown bark.
Hardy zones 6 to 8

Populus wilsonii ( Wilson's Poplar )
A handsome, large tree native to western and central China reaching a maximum height of 85 feet with a trunk diameter up to 5 feet. Fast growing, it can reach 65 feet in only 20 years.
The very large leaves,broadly-ovate to nearly rounded leaves are up to 9 x 7 inches in size. The foliage is red at first turning to blue-green above and gray beneath.
The flower catkins, up to 6 inches in length, appear during mid to late spring.
The furrowed bark is dark grayish-brown.
Hardy north to zone 5

Populus yunnanensis ( Yunnan Balsam Poplar )
A large tree reaching 80 feet or more, that is native to southwest China.
Some records include: 5 years - 20 feet; 20 years - 66 feet; largest on record - 120 x 80 feet with a trunk diameter of 44 inches. It is short-lived, rarely exceeding 100 years.
The triangular leaves, up to 7 x 5 inches in size, are red tinted at first turning to glossy bright green with red veins above. The foliage is white beneath. The leaves are borne on red stalks.
This tree is also very colorful in winter due to its reddish young twigs.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 and tolerant of both heat and drought which along with its resistance to leaf rust makes this a much more valuable shelter tree in much of the eastern and central U.S. than Populus nigra.

1 comment:

  1. http://newztekmisk.blogspot.com/2014/07/please-identify-this-leafplant.html can you identify the plant pictured at the link on my blogspot at google?

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