Sunday, January 17, 2010

Chinese Fig Hazel

Sycopsis sinensis

The Chinese Fig Hazel is a fast growing, very dense, small evergreen tree that is native to western and central China. Some records include: largest on record - 50 x 30 x 1.5 feet; 20 years - 20 x 13 + feet; fastest growth rate - 4 feet. Long lived, it can live well over 100 years. It can be used as both an ornamental tree and for screening.
The thick, leathery, non-toothed leaves are up to 6 x 3 inches in size. The luxuriant, very attractive foliage is glossy, deep green. The leaves usually maintain their color all winter unless conditions are unusually severe.
The small, yellow ( with red anthers ) flowers are borne during late winter.
The smooth bark is gray.
Hardy zones 6 to 10 ( tolerating -10 F ), in sun or partial shade on acidic, well drained soil. This tree is heat tolerant and thrives in the Mid Atlantic and southeastern U.S. Protection from deer may be required where they are abundant.

* photos taken @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C. on Feb 2009




* photos taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


* photo taken on Mar 8 2013 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD
* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

* photos taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Apr 23 2017 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD
* photo taken on Sep 3 2017 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.


Sycoparrotia semidecidua
The hybrid between Sycopsis sinensis and Parrotia persica. It is fast growing, very dense, small to medium-sized, evergreen tree. Some records include: largest on record - 50 x 30 x 1.5 feet; 20 years - 20 x 13 + feet; fastest growth rate - 4 feet.
The thick, leathery leaves are up to 6 x 3 ( rarely over 4 ) inches in size. The luxuriant, very attractive foliage is glossy deep green. The leaves usually maintain their color all winter unless conditions are unusually severe. The foliage may turn yellow before dropping.
Its bark is smooth and gray.
Hardy zone 6 to 10 ( tolerating down to - 10 F ), thriving in sun or part shade. This tree is heat / drought tolerant and does well in the Mid Atlantic and southeastern U.S..

* photos taken @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C. on Feb 2009




* photos taken on March 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on October 17 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

* photo taken on Mar 8 2013 @ Brookside Gardens, Wheaton, MD
* photos taken on Apr 24 2016 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on Sep 3 2017 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.

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